Skip to main content

Full text of "Historic Furnishings Report/HFC: The Wayside--Minute Man National Historical Park"

See other formats


Xa3.r$b-a:*fH 


Clemson  Universi 


3  1604  019  700  980 


^^\\C  DOCUMENTS 

DEO    1     * 

CLEMSON 
UBRARt 


Historic  Furnishings  Report/HFC 

MINUTE  MAN 
NATIONAL 
HISTORICAL  PARK 

THE  WAYSIDE 


0. 


Recommended:       <^- 

UepUty  Manager,    Harpers   Ferry-*€enter 


Recommended-: 


JUN  1  0  1983 


Date 


8-3-83 
onal     listorical   Park         Date 


Recommended 


A'fe%  U    (Mi 


Dek?iA"tvi    Regional   Director,    North  Atlantic  Region 


"Da 


)ate 


Prepared   and   published   by  the   Denver  Service  Center 


HISTORIC  FURNISHINGS  PLAN 

THE  WAYSIDE 

MINUTE  MAN  NATIONAL  HISTORICAL  PARK 

CONCORD,  MASSACHUSETTS 


Prepared  under  contract  by 

Doris  Fanelli 

Harpers  Ferry  Center 

1983 


U.S.  Department  of  the  Interior  /  National  Park  Service  /  Harpers  Ferry  Center 


Digitized  by  the  Internet  Archive 

in  2012  with  funding  from 

LYRASIS  Members  and  Sloan  Foundation 


http://archive.org/details/historicfurnishiOOfane 


CONTENTS 

ABBREVIATIONS  USED  IN  TEXT  /iv 

PREFACE  /l 

DEFINITION  OF  INTERPRETIVE  OBJECTIVES  /3 

OPERATING  PLAN  /9 

ANALYSIS  OF  HISTORICAL  OCCUPANCY  /13 

Biographical  Sketches  of  Wayside  Occupants  /13 

Room-By-Room  Use  and  Activities  /53 

BAY  WINDOW  ROOM  /53 

DINING  ROOM  /54 

KITCHEN  /56 

MRS.    HAWTHORNE'S   PARLOR   OR   LIBRARY  OR   DRAWING  ROOM     /58 

OLD  ROOM     /58 

LOWER  FRONT  HALL  OR  MAIN  HALLWAY  /60 

PIAZZA  ROOM  /60 

PIAZZA  (WEST)  /64 

SITTING  ROOM  /65 

EAST  CHAMBER  /67 

GUEST  ROOM  OR  TERRACE  ROOM  /68 

LARGE  BATHROOM  /69 

MAID'S  ROOM  AND  DRESSING  ROOM  /70 

NORTHEAST  CORRIDOR  /70 

NORTHWEST  CORRIDOR  /71 

SMALL  BATHROOM  /71 

TOWER  STUDY  /71 

UNA'S  ROOM  111 

UPPER  COLONIAL  ENTRY  /73 

UPPER  FRONT  HALL  /73 

WEST  CHAMBER  OR  HAWTHORNE  BEDROOM  /73 

EVIDENCE  OF  ORIGINAL  FURNISHINGS  /75 

Introduction  /75 

Room-By-Room  Furnishings  Evidence  /79 


BAY  WINDOW  ROOM  /79 

DINING  ROOM  /82 

KITCHEN  /90 

LOWER   FRONT   HALL      /109 

MRS.    HAWTHORNE'S   PARLOR     /113 

OLD  ROOM     /120 

PIAZZA  ROOM  /127 

SITTING  ROOM  /133 

EAST  CHAMBER  /144 

GUEST  ROOM  OR  TERRACE  ROOM  /151 

LARGE  BATHROOM  /155 

MAID'S  ROOM  /156 

SMALL  BATHROOM  /159 

TOWER  STUDY  /159 

UNA'S  ROOM  /164 

UPPER  FRONT  HALL  7170 

WEST  CHAMBER  OR  HAWTHORNE  BEDROOM  /172 

RECOMMENDED  FURNISHINGS  /178 

Introduction  /l 78 

BAY  WINDOW  ROOM  /180 

DINING  ROOM  /182 

KITCHEN  /187 

LOWER  FRONT  HALL  /196 

MRS.  HAWTHORNE'S  PARLOR  /198 

OLD  ROOM  /200 

PIAZZA  ROOM  /205 

SITTING  ROOM  /209 

EAST  CHAMBER  /215 

GUEST  ROOM  OR  TERRACE  ROOM  /218 

LARGE  BATHROOM  /222 

MAID'S  ROOM  /224 

SMALL  BATHROOM  /227 

TOWER  STUDY  /227 

UNA'S  ROOM  /233 

UPPER  FRONT  HALL  /238 

WEST  CHAMBER  OR  HAWTHORNE  BEDROOM  /239 

SPECIAL  INSTALLATION,  MAINTENANCE  AND  PROTECTION  RECOMMENDATIONS 
(Diana  R.  Pardue)  /243 

BIBLIOGRAPHY  /269 


n 


ILLUSTRATIONS  /273 

FLOOR  PLANS  AND  ELEVATIONS  /398 

APPENDICES  /415 

AWNINGS  REPORT  /486 

Illustrations     /497 

Appendix     /510 


l  n 


ABBREVIATIONS  USED  IN  TEXT 

HDS:      Robert  D.  Ronsheim,  "The  Wayside:  Historic  Structure 
Report,  Part  II,  Historic  Data  Section"  (National  Park 
Service:  Division  of  History,  Office  of  Archaeology  and 
Historic  Preservation,  1968). 

HGR:      Anna  Coxe  Toogood,  "The  Wayside,  Historic  Grounds  Report" 
(Washington,  D.C.:  Office  of  History  and  Architecture, 
National  Park  Service,  Eastern  Service  Center,  1970). 

ADS:      Orville  W.  Carroll,  "The  Wayside  Historic  Structure  Report, 
Part  II,  Architectural  Data  Section"  (Washington,  D.C.: 
Division  of  Historic  Architecture,  Office  of  Archaeology 
and  Historic  Preservation,  1968). 

ABA:  Amos  Bronson  Alcott 

HML:  Harriett  Mulford  Lothrop 

MML:  Margaret  Mulford  Lothrop 

MMNHP:  Minute  Man  National  Historical  Park 


IV 


PREFACE 

Fifteen  years  of  preliminary  research  by  the  staff  of  the  National 
Park  Service  and  Minute  Man  National   Historical   Park  and  more  than 
forty  years  of  research  by  Margaret  M.   Lothrop  expedited  the  prepa- 
ration of  this   furnishing  plan.     When  the  Park  Service  acquired  the 
Wayside  in  1965,  a  staff  of  historians  and  architectural   historians 
prepared  reports  on  the  property.     Their  research  included  the  com- 
pilation of  photocopies  of  primary  materials   for  MMNHP's  Library. 
Historians  were  also  able  to  interview  Miss  Lothrop  and  record 
first-person  accounts  of  the  Wayside  during  her  family's  occupancy. 

Miss  Lothrop  devoted  much  of  her  life  to   researching  the  history  of 
the  Wayside  and  its  occupants.     She  traveled  to  various  repositories 
throughout  the  United  States  and  examined  and  hand  copied  many  rele- 
vant primary  documents.     Her  research  notebooks   (numbering  over  25 
volumes)   and  items  relating  to  her  family's  occupancy  of  the  house 
are  now  preserved  at  MMNHP.     Historians  Robert  Ronsheim  and  Anna 
Coxe  Toogood  checked  her  research  notes   for  completeness  and  accu- 
racy when  they  compiled  their  own  research  reports  on  the  property. 
Extracts  from  the  research  notes  are  typed  and  filed  in  the  Park 
Library. 

In  the  late  1960s,  Robert  Ronsheim  began  to  write  a  furnishing  plan 
for  the  Wayside.     Althouqh  this  project  was  never  completed,  his 
"Draft  of  Evidence  of  Historic  Furnishings"   remains  in  the  park 


files.  The  focus  of  Ronsheim's  plan  is  the  1913-15  period.  By 
building  on  his  research,  I  have  been  able  to  maximize  my  limited 
onsite  research  time  and  write  a  more  detailed  plan  than  would  other- 
wise have  been  possible. 

The  assistance  and  cooperation  of  the  staff  at  MMNHP  also  made  my 
research  pleasant  and  efficient.  Superintendent  Bob  Nash  gave  me 
access  to  all  cf  the  park's  documents.  Chief  of  Interpretation  Fred 
Szarka  offered  advice  and  assistance.  Curator  Michelle  West  inter- 
rupted her  own  busy  schedule  to  assist  me  in  locating  various  mate- 
rials. Park  Technician  Robert  Derry  generously  shared  his  extensive 
knowledge  of  Hawthorne. 


DEFINITION   OF    INTERPRETIVE   OBJECTIVES 

The   Interpretive  Prospectus   for  Minute  Man  National   Historical   Park 
states   that   "The  Wayside  will    be   interpreted   not   as   a  house  but   rather 
as    a  home,    a  family  home,    altered   by  the   needs   of   successive  family 
occupations.      Its    inhabitants  will    be   shown   not   as    isolated   figures 
but   as   people   living   in   a  changing   and   growing   house  within   the 
context   of  philosophical,    literary,    and  other  changes   occurring     in 
the  Concord   and   broader   national    community—The  American  Renais- 
sance."!    In   addition   to   numerous   owners   and   occupants   during   its 
two  hundred   and   eighty-five  years,    the   house   has   had  many  structural 
changes.     Both   types   of  change—personal    and  material  —  are   reflected 
in   this   furnishings   plan. 

The  Wayside   is   restored   to   its    appearance   in  1924,    the  year   of 
Harriett  M.   Lothrop's  death.     The   house   is   interpreted   to  the  Lothrop 
period   of  occupancy,   1883-1924,   with   reference  to   the   earlier 
occupations   of  the  Alcotts   and   of  the  Hawthornes.2     This   furnishings 
plan  will    follow  this   interpretation  mentioning,   when   possible,    other 
occupants  of  the  house. 


1.  "Interpretive  Prospectus:     Minute  Man  National  Historical   Park, 
Massachusetts"    (U.S.    Department   of  the  Interior:      National   Park 
Service,  1971),   p.   23. 

2.  The  operating   plan   specifies   that   the  visitor  will    "view  the 
building  through  Lothrop  eyes"  while   also   hearing   about   preceding 
inhabitants.     "Interpretive  Prospectus,"   p.   24. 


Reference  to  preceding  occupants  of  the  Wayside  is  difficult  for  the 

following  reasons.  There  is  lack  of  any  information  beyond  names  and 

public  statistics  about  many  of  the  pre-1845  occupants  and  later 

renters  of  the  property.  What  little  primary  description  survives 

about  the  house  before  1845  refers  only  to  its  exterior  appearance, 

or  to  the  achievements  of  its  occupants  outside  of  the  home,  for 

3 
example,  Whitney  and  Winthrop.   A  furnishing  plan  focusing  on  the 

earlier  inhabitants  of  the  house  would  be  entirely  conjectural,  and 

such  an  idealized  plan  is  unnecessary  in  light  of  the  overwhelming 

number  of  objects  and  documents  from  the  Lothrop  occupancy. 

While  some  biographical  information  about  several  of  the  later  inhab- 
itants of  the  house  (such  as  N.C.  Peabody,  the  Manns,  Julian  Haw- 
thorne's family,  or  the  Lathrops)  is  known,  these  people  lived  at  the 
Wayside  for  a  comparatively  brief  period  and  their  achievements  dur- 
ing their  residency  are  overshadowed  by  the  accomplishments,  informa- 
tion, and  furnishings  of  the  Alcotts,  Hawthornes,  and  Lothrops.  It 


3.  For  a  narrative  account  of  early  occupants  of  the  Wayside,  see 
Robert  D.  Ronsheim,  The  Wayside:  Historic  Structure  Report,  Part  II, 
Historic  Data  Section  (National  Park  Service:  Division  of  History, 
Office  of  Archaeology  and  Historic  Preservation,  1968).  Hereafter 
cited  as  HDS.  Ronsheim's  excellent  report  summarizes  information 
contained  in  a  variety  of  primary  sources.  This  information  was  col- 
lected by  early  researchers  at  Minute  Man  Park  from  area  repositories 
Photocopies  of  many  of  the  original  sources  are  stored  in  the  park 
1 ibrary . 


is   strongly  suspected   that   the  Manns   and  Nathaniel   Peabody  lived  with 
the  Hawthornes'   furnishings  while  they  were  residents   of  the  Wayside. 
We   also   know  that  when  Harriett  M.    Lothrop  rented   her   home   in  the 
early  twentieth  century,    she   kept   her   furnishings   in   it. 4 

Several    themes   ran   through  the   lives   of  the  Wayside's   occupants 
which   serve  to  tie  the  furnishings   plan   and   the   interpretation   of   the 
house   together. 

All    of  the  principal    residents   had   a  strong   interest   in   children's 
education   and  moral    development.     Amos   Bronson  Alcott's   ideas   on   edu- 
cation  and   teachina  methods   are  wel 1 -documented   in   his   journals.     He 
practiced  many  of  these  methods   in   his   daughters'   educations  while   at 
the  Wayside. 

Nathaniel   Hawthorne  wrote   children's   stories   and   read   his   daily 
writing   to  his   children  each   evening   to   test   their   reactions   to   his 
work.     His   brother-in-law,    Horace  Mann,   was   a  proponent   of   education 
as   an   eradicator  of   class   distinctions    and   an   abolisher  of   social 
ills.     Mann's  widow,   Mary  Peabody  Mann   and   their   two   sons   lived   at 
the  Wayside  for   nearly  ten  months  while  the  Hawthornes  were   in  Europe. 
Sophia  Hawthorne's   sister,    Elizabeth  Palmer  Peabody,   was   a  disciple 
of  Emerson   and  Alcott,    an   advocate   of  the   kindergarten  movement, 


4.     Two  separate   inventories  of  the  Lothrop  home  were  made  before 
it  was   rented   in   1914   and    in  1915.      See  Appendices  C   and  D  of   this 
report   for  copies   of  the   inventories.     The  original    inventories   are   at 
IP. 


and  taught  the  Alcott  children.     She  lived  in  Concord  and  frequently 

5 
visited  the  Alcotts,  Hawthornes,  and  Lothrops. 


Daniel   and  Harriett  Lothrop  had  interests   in  the  formation  of  chil- 
dren's moral    values.     Daniel  was  an  early  publisher  of  juvenile 
literature.     He  published  one  magazine,  Wide  Awake,  at  a  deficit 
because  he  believed  in  its  value  to  its  young  readers.     Harriett, 
under  the  pen  name  Margaret  Sidney,  wrote  the  Five  Little  Peppers 
series  and  other  children's  books.     Sidney's  portrayals  of  the 

Peppers  epitomize  the  attitudes  of  late  Victorians  toward  children 

6 
and  summarize     adult  expectations  of  them.       Mrs.   Lothrop's  member- 
ship in  the  Daughters  of  the  American  Revolution  and  her  organiza- 
tion of  the  Children  of  the  American  Revolution  (hereafter  cited 
as  DAR  and  CAR,  respectively)   also  reflect  her  interests  in  the 
moral    development  of  children. 

Concomitant  with  an  interest  in  morality  and  education  were  the 
occupants'    social   consciousnesses. 

Bronson  Alcott's  lifestyle  revolved  around  social    reform.     He  struc- 
tured for  his  family  a  philosophically  and  physically  rigorous 


5.  The  definitive  biography  of  the  three  Peabody  sisters   is  Louise 
Hall   Tharp,  The  Peabody  Sisters  of  Salem  (Boston:     Little,  Brown  & 
Co.,   1950). 

6.  The  best  source  of  information  about  the  Lothrops   is   their 
daughter,   Margaret  Mulford  Lothrop,   The  Wayside:   Home  of  Authors 
(New  York:     American  Book  Company,   1968) . 


existence  which  was  reflected  in  his  occupation  and  use  of  the  Way- 
side.    He  practiced  lacto-ovo  vegetarianism  and  his  family  abstained 
from  meat.     He  ran  his  household  on  a  strictly  timed  schedule  and 
spent  much  of  his   productivity  at  the  Wayside  constructing  additions 
to  the  house  and  elaborate,   rustic  gardens  which  were  inspired  by 
A.J.   Downing.     The  purpose  of  this  construction  was  the  creation  of 
an  ordered  environment  in  which  to   live  a  socially-reformed,   Utopian 
1  i  f  e . 

The  Alcotts  were  abolitionists.     They  supported  the  leaders  of  the 
abolitionist  movement  in  Boston,  boycotted  the  products  of  slave 
labor,  and  even  secreted  a  slave  in  their  home  on  his  underground 
journey  to  freedom  in  Canada.     Their  incorporation  of  social    re- 
form with  transcendental    philosophy  colored  their  entire  lives. 
Certainly,   it  characterized  their  years  at  the  Wayside. 

The  Hawthornes  were  also  anti-slavery.     Sophia  Peabody  and  her  sis- 
ters attended  lectures  by  abolitionists.     Hawthorne's   reluctance  to 
accept  Franlin  Pierce's   request  to  write  his  campaign  biography 
stemmed  from  Pierce's  weak  stand  on  the  slavery  issue. 

Harriett  Lothrop's  preservation  efforts  and  her  organization  of  the 
CAR  are  important  to  the  history  of  the  American  preservation  move- 
ment.    The  surviving  photographs  of  her  "room  settings"  at  the  Way- 
side are  invaluable  records.     Collecting  American  antiques  was  a 
flourishing  hobby  in  the  nineteenth  century  long  before  the  Lothrops 


purchased  the  Wayside.     The  Mount  Vernon  Ladies  Association's  pur- 
chase of  Mount  Vernon  in  1859  heralded  the  formal   beginning  of  the 
restoration  of  historic  houses   in  America.     Mrs.   Lothrop's  acquisi- 
tion of  furnishings,  her  room  arrangements,  and  her  interpretation 
of  the  Wayside  are  \/ery  important  activities.     They  show  us  a  nine- 
teenth-century American's   view  of  the  past  throuqh   a  conscious   re- 
creation of  history.     By  setting  the  Wayside  in  the  Lothrop  period 
of  occupancy,  we  are  doing  more  than  interpreting  the  lifestyles  of 
individuals  at  a  particular  point  in  time;  we  are  interpreting  to 
visitors  an  interpretation  of  history.     We  are  seeing  the  Hawthornes 
and  Alcotts  through  the  eyes  of  Harriett  and  Margaret  Lothrop,  and 
showing  the  public  an  important  stage  in  the  development  of  historic 
site  management.     Although  this  tack  is  at  times  confusing  and  con- 
tradictory to  the  aims  of  many  historic  recreations  today,   the  im- 
portance of  the  Wayside  to  historic  interpretation  is  part  of  its 
uniqueness  and  we  must  not  lose  sight  of  that  fact. 


OPERATING  PLAN 

Visitors  to  the  Wayside  are  conducted  through  the  house  by  means  of 
a  personally  guided  tour.  Visitors  have  access  to  both  the  first  and 
second  floors  and  the  Tower  Study.  Twelve  of  the  fourteen  rooms  are 
shown  to  the  public.  Entering  at  the  front  door,  the  tour  proceeds 
through  the  following  furnished  areas:  the  Sitting  Room;  the  Piazza 
Room;  the  Hawthorne-Lothrop  Parlor;  Una's  Room;  the  Terrace  Room;  the 
Tower  Study;  the  West  Chamber  (Hawthorne's  Master  Bedroom);  the  East 
Chamber  (Lothrop  Master  Bedroom);  the  Bay  Window  Room;  the  Lothrop 
Dining  Room;  the  Old  Room  (Alcott-Hawthorne  Kitchen);  and  the  Kitchen. 
The  lavatory  and  maids'  chambers  are  not  shown  to  the  public  (these 
are  the  two  rooms  behind  the  East  Chamber).  Visitors  exit  through  the 
kitchen  door.  Visitor  access  to  all  rooms  is  limited  by  barriers. 

Visitor  access  to  the  Wayside  Barn  (Visitor  Center)  is  through  two 
doors,  one  on  the  east  side  and  one  on  the  west  side.  There  are  ex- 
hibits, an  Eastern  National  Park  &  Monument  Association  sales  area, 
and  an  eleven-minute  audiovisual  program  is  available  to  visitors 
either  at  the  beginning  or  end  of  the  tour. 

Included  with  this  operating  plan  are  several  alternate  tour 
plans: 


Alternative  1:     The  reverse  flow  tour; 

Alternative  2:     A  comprehensive  tour  which  includes  all  14 

rooms. 

Alternative  3:  A  first-floor-only  tour  for  physically 

handicapped   visitors. 


These   alternatives,   to  date   untried,    are  under  consideration   to 
provide  greater  accessibility  to  the  Wayside. 


10 


cc 
o 
o 


cc 
o 
o 


c 

CM 


I 

Q. 


cc 


o 

z 

o 

c 

cC 
ui 

o 
z 


cc 
o 
o 


.f1 

^         1 

r 

z 

1 

^- 

"^         1 

X           r- 

L 

a  -  zm 

r 

, 

o  s 

. 

°  £o    i 

*~  z  s 

5 
O 

Q 

O 

'\  o 

r-        CC 

y 

*""        Q 

Z 

_1 

CD 

^ 

O 

> 

rv 

^    I 

00 

UJ 

£  *           "1 

2  o 

1 

SITTINC 
ROOM 

> 

<  e 

u 

TH\ 

"^S 

z 

D£ 

<   _ 

CM        M  O 

H 
Z 

<  O 

E  * 

@ 


CO 


<5 


UJ 


_<> 


in 


L_I 

is 

I- 


r^ 


a: 

UJ 
(-    00 

>   X 

o 


cc 
O 
O 


-a 

c 

CM 


<"  2 

<  O 

Z  O 

Z>  DC 


cc 
o 


Di 

CC 

c_> 


Q 


O 

z 

o 
o 

DC 


n 


Z 

M 

o 

H 
m 

o  Z       - 

3 
Q. 

■n 

33 

o  >     -^ 

f- 

o 

Z     LO 

O 

o 

2 

\  . 

O 
30 

Z 

o 

JLL 

On 

Z 

o 

H 

t/i 

3; 

n 

-i 

O 

x  £ 

5°    2 

« 

>  m 

o  2 

z 

2  S     *J 

o  £     en 

EC    H 

^  > 

H 

m 

•*  o 

O 

»                      "N 

\ 

?8 

* 

^ / 

| 

r- 

H 
C 
D 

>     ^ 

-< 

!*£ 

f 

K^" 

3= 

*      ^ 

I- 
—1 
m 

TO 

% 
— 1 

n 

o 

NJk  en  h 
m 

70 

i 

m  » 

"a 
i — 
1= 

s 

ft 

=tt 

l\3 

o 

o 
3 


par  s  d 


—  —  >  z 


■  j^    5 


z 
o 

H 
m 

73 
O 

o 

.-: 
Z 

c 


z 
o 

-•: 


O 
3= 
Z 

H 
O 

m 

JO 

n 

H 

C 

a 
-< 


O 
O 

33 


ANALYSIS  OF  HISTORICAL  OCCUPANCY 

Biographical  Sketches  of  Wayside  Occupants 

For  a  complete  list  of  owners  and  occupants  of  the  Wayside,  see  the 
chart  in  Appendix  A.  This  section  presents  brief  biographical 
sketches  of  the  Wayside's  occupants  during  their  residencies. 

ALCOTT  FAMILY 

Residence  at  the  Wayside:     April    1,   1845-November  17,   1848. 
Between  September,   1857,   and  June,   1858,   they  occupied  portions  of 
the  house  while  their  home  next  door  was  undergoing  renovation. 

Amos  Bronson  Alcott 

b.     November  29,   1799 
d.     March  4,   1888 

Alcott  named  the  property  and  house,   "Hillside"  and  always   referred 

1 
to  it  by  that  name.       At  various  periods  of  his  life,  Alcott  had  been 


1.     To  eliminate  confusion,   this   report  will    refer  to  the  house  and 
grounds  as  the  Wayside  throughout.     Alcott  called  the  property  Hill- 
side throughout  his  life. 

Odell   Shepard's  biography  of  Alcott,  Pedlar's  Progress,  The  Life  of 
Bronson  Alcott  (New  York:     Greenwood  Press,   1968)   is   the  standard  text. 
Alcott's  journals  provide  much  information  about  his  motivations  and 
actions  while  at  the  Wayside.     The  original   journals  are  at  Widner  Li- 
brary, Harvard  University.     Microfilm  copies  of  the  journals  are  at  the 
Concord  Public  Library  and  at  MMNHP.     Shepard  published  an  edited  ver- 
sion of  the  journals  in  two  volumes  in  The  Journals  of  Bronson  Alcott 
(Boston:     Little,  Brown  &  Co.,   1938). 


13 


employed  as  a  teacher.     During  his  years  at  the  Wayside,  Alcott  oc- 
cupied himself  by  keeping  a  journal,  teaching  his  daughters,   reno- 
vating the  house  and  landscaping  the  grounds,  visiting  and  receiving 
his  friends  for  philosophical   conversations,  and  pursuing  his   inter- 
ests  in  social    reform. 

For  Bronson  Alcott,   keeping  a  journal  was  almost  a  full-time  occupa- 
tion.    He  published  little  during  his   lifetime  and  his  journal    is  an 
excellent  record  of  not  only  his  own  but  the  activities  of  many  of 
the  Wayside's  inhabitants.     Journal -keeping,   for  Alcott,  was  almost 
a  mystical   experience,  a  sort  of  meditation  on  paper.     He  showed  his 
journal    to  few.     Ralph  Waldo  Emerson  was  privileged  to  see  it.     He 
also  required  his  daughters  to  keep  journals  which  he  reviewed: 
"Anna  wrote  a  little  poem  in  her  Journal   and  Elizabeth  studied  the 
points  and  capital    letters.     I   corrected  their  Journals  which  they 
wrote  \/ery  faithfully.     Louisa  was  unfaithful   and  took  her  dinner 

alone."     In  other  entries,  Bronson  records  that  he  drew  pictures  of 

2 
his  house  for  the  frontispieces  of  his  daughters'   journals. 

From  the  pages  of  his  journal,  Alcott  emerges  as  a  man  with  a  sense 
of  personal   greatness  that  his  outward  achievements  belie.     He  viewed 


2.     Shepard,   ed.,  April    (undated),   1846,   p.    174.     Alcott  often  cor- 
rected his  daughters'   writings  and  then  had  them  make  a  clean  copy 
in  their  journals.     This    is  discussed  in  Lothrop,   pp.   52-3. 


14 


himself  as  a  philosopher,  a  counterpart  of  Plato  and  Socrates  whose 
teaching  methods  he  copied.  Occasionally,  Alcott's  entries  bemoan 
the  lack  of  recognition  his  plans  received  and  the  necessity  of 
dealing  with  intellects  lesser  than  his  own. 

Alcott  did  not  work  during  his  years  at  the  Wayside.  Income  was 
chiefly  derived  from  the  contributions  of  Emerson  and  his  brother- 
in-law,  Samuel  J.  May,  and  from  odd  jobs  that  his  wife  took.  Well- 
wishing  relatives  and  friends  often  invited  the  Alcott  daughters 
for  extended  visits  that  relieved  the  financially-burdened  family. 
Alcott  did  not  own  the  Wayside.  Samuel  J.  May  purchased  it  in  trust 
for  his  sister,  Abigail  May  Alcott.  May  correctly  judged  his  brother- 
in-law's  inability  to  manage  funds  and  property. 

Although  he  contributed  nothing  to  the  support  of  his  family,  Alcott 
determined  the  daily  course  of  events  and  was  commonly  acknowledged 
as  the  head  of  the  household.  Despite  the  rosy  picture  of  life  in 
the  Alcott  family  painted  by  most  biographers,  by  the  girls'  jour- 
nals (which  they  knew  that  their  parents  read),  and  by  the  most 
frequently-cited  indicator,  Little  Women  (which  Louisa  wrote  twenty 
years  later  at  the  insistence  of  her  father),  monetary  problems  and 
Alcott's  insouciance  caused  tension  between  Alcott  and  his  wife. 
When  Abba  took  her  daughters  and  left  Fruitlands  (their  home  before 
the  Wayside),  she  became  the  catalyst  for  the  demise  of  the  communal 
experiment.  After  the  family  left  the  Wayside  for  Boston,  she  and 


15 


Alcott  again  separated  for  a  time.     In  February,  1848,  Mrs.  Alcott 

was  so  desperate  for  a  financial   solution  to  her  problems  that  she 

seriously  contemplated  purchasing  animals  to  make  the  Wayside  a 

viable,  self-supporting  farm.     This  was  against  her  husband's  vege- 

3 
tarian  teachings. 

Alcott  was  a  yery  scheduled  individual,  as  exemplified  by  the  rig- 
orous  routine  he  outlined  for  himself  and  his  family  in  his  journal 


Rise  at  5 — Light  fires--Bathe  (Shower  Bath)-- 
Call   children,  assist  in  their  bathing  and 
dressing--Shave  and  dress--Breakfast  at  6. 
Reading  of  a  hymn,  with  Conversation.     Music-- 
Prepare  wood--7,  Read,  Study,  write  till    10. 
Instruct  the  children--12,  Dinner  Labour  till 
3  in  Garden—Readings  with  mother  and  chil- 
dren.    5,  Bathe  and  help  children's  bathing. 
6,  Supper.     Music  and  Conversation.     7  till   9, 
Reading  and  writing.     9,  Bed. 


Alcott  had  a  keen  interest  in  children's  education.     From  the  early 
years  of  his  marriage  in  Philadelphia,  he  operated  a  series  of  schools 
which  utilized  unorthodox  teaching  methods.     For  various   reasons   (death 


3.  For  a  summary  of  the  Alcotts'   life  at  the  Wayside,  see  HDS,   pp. 
13-19;  Anna  Coxe  Toogood,  The  Wayside:     Historic  Grounds  Report 
(Washington,  D.C.:     Office  of  History  and  Architecture,  National   Park 
Service,   Eastern  Service  Center,   1970),   pp.    1-32   (hereinafter  cited 
as  HGR);  on  converting  the  Wayside   into  a  self-supporting  farm,  see 
Abigail   May  Alcott  to  Samuel   J.   May,   February   13,   1848,   as   quoted  in 
HGR,   pp.   27-28. 

4.  Shepard,   ed.,   p.   174.     Entry  for  April    5,   1846. 


16 


of  a  wealthy  patron,  controversial  teaching  techniques)  his  schools 

failed.  While  in  Concord,  Alcott  maintained  his  interests  by  teach- 

5 
ing  his  daughters.  On  Sundays,  he  also  taught  the  Emerson  children. 

Renovating  the  house  and  landscaping  the  gardens  consumed  much  of 

Alcott' s  time.  The  additions  and  improvements  that  he  made  to  the 

property  are  recorded  by  Orville  W.  Carroll  in  the  architectural 

report  on  the  Wayside.  In  her  report  on  the  historic  grounds  at 

the  Wayside,  Anna  Coxe  Toogood  records  that  Alcott  spent  up  to 

nine  hours  per  day  from  April  through  October,  1845,  working  on 

6 
the  gardens  and  grounds.   He  planted  a  large  vegetable  garden  for 

the  family's  subsistence  as  well  as  ornamental  flowers  and  foliage. 
The  entire  family  spent  a  great  deal  of  time  outdoors  during  the 
warm  weather.  Classes,  family  entertainments  such  as  reading  and 
singing,  even  bathing,  took  place  outside.  In  fact,  Alcott's  rec- 
ords of  the  grounds  are  far  more  detailed  and  precise  than  the  sur- 
viving records  of  the  interior  and  its  furnishings  during  his  ten- 
ancy. 


5.  Ibid.,  pp.  476-77,  467,  484.  For  additional  information  about 
Alcott's  early  schools  and  his  family's  reaction  to  them,  see  Martha 
Saxton,  Louisa  May,  A  Modern  Biography  of  Louisa  May  Alcott  (Boston: 
Houghton  Mifflin,  1977). 

6.  Orville  W.  Carroll,  The  Wayside:  Historic  Structure  Report, 
Part  II,  Architectural  Data  Section  (Washington,  D.C.:  Division  of 
Historic  Architecture,  Office  of  Archaeology  and  Historic  Preserva- 
tion, 1968).  Hereafter  cited  as  ADS:  HGR,  p.  10. 


17 


Alcott  moved  to  Concord  to  be  close  to  other  transcendental ist 

thinkers  with  whom  he  felt  a  bond.  His  friend,  and  often  patron, 

Ralph  Waldo  Emerson,  was  his  most  frequent  visitor.  Henry  David 

Thoreau  and  William  Ellery  Channinq  were  also  part  of  Alcott 's 

circle  and  called  at  the  Wayside.  These  friendships  made  Alcott's 

life  in  Concord  tolerable  for,  as  he  recorded  in  his  journal,  "I 

am  scarcely  on  human  relations  with  any  one  of  my  townsmen.  The 

coarse  tie  of  appetite  brinqs  us  toqether  in  field,  or  road,  and 

7 
farm  house." 

Alcott  supplemented  his  aqrarian  periods  with  visits  to  Boston  and 
brief  lecture  tours.     Throuqhout  his  life  he  spent  portions  of 
e\/ery  winter  travel inq  in  the  Northeastern  United  States  qivinq 
"conversations"  or  public  lectures.     In  1846,  for  instance,  he  ad- 
dressed the  Peace  Society,   the  Abolition  Society,  and  the  Teachers' 

Institute  of  Providence.     Unfortunately,  these  junkets  yielded 

8 
Alcott  little  profit  until   much  later  in  his  life. 

An  interest  in  social    reform  continued  to  characterize  Alcott's 
years  at  the  Wayside.     Althouqh  his   Fruitlands   experiment  failed 
before  he  moved  to  Concord,  he  still   harbored  hopes  of  establish- 


7.  Alcott  Journal,   XX,  entry  for  April    25,   1846,  microfilm  at 
MMNHP,  as  quoted  in  HGR,   p.    22. 

8.  Lothrop,   p.   70.     Cf.   Saxton,   for  comments  on  Bronson's  travels 


18 


ing  a  communal  living  situation.  Bronson  wrote  to  his  brother, 

Junius,  encouraging  him  to  move  into  the  Wayside  with  him.  Junius 

did  not  comply.  Charles  Lane  and  his  son  stayed  six  weeks  during 

the  summer  of  1845.  Between  May  and  December  of  that  same  year, 

Miss  Sophia  Ford  of  Northampton  came  to  stay  with  the  Alcotts  in 

hopes  of  establishing  a  school.  During  her  stay,  she  taught  the 

Alcott  girls.  When  the  prospect  of  a  school  diminished,  she  moved 

on  to  the  Emersons '  and  taught  there.  Sidney  Southworth,  George 

Leach,  and  Frederick  L.H.  Willis,  an  orphan,  and  later  a  Harvard 

divinity  student,  lived  at  the  Wayside  during  summer  vacations. 

Willis  fondly  recalled  his  visits  and  pleasant  afternoons  in  the 

Alcott  parlor.  His  communal  instincts  aside,  Alcott  quite  probably 

wanted  to  expand  the  income  base  of  his  household.  Mrs.  Alcott  did 

9 
not  share  her  husband's  interests  in  communal  living. 

Another  guest  in  the  Alcott  home  reflected  Alcott1 s  commitment  to 
abolitionism.  For  two  weeks  the  family  sheltered  a  fugitive  slave 
from  Maryland  on  his  way  to  Canada.  The  Alcotts  boycotted  slave 


9.  Information  about  Bronson  Alcott's  plans  and  the  guests  at  the 
Wayside  can  be  found  in  HDS,  pp.  17-18,  and  in  HGR,  pp.  7,  19;  and 
in  Lothrop,  pp.  74-75.  Charles  Lane  commented  that  Mrs.  Alcott 
"wished  to  keep  her  family  small,  and  made  it  uncomfortable  for 
guests."  Quoted  in  Frank  B.  Sanborn  and  William  T.  Harris,  Amos 
Bronson  Alcott,  His  Life  and  Philosophy,  I  and  II,  (New  York: 
Bi bio  and  Tanner,  1965  after  1893  edition),  p.  67,  excerpts,  type- 
script, MMNHP  files. 


19 


products  (except  leather  and  cotton  which  they  could  not  do  without) 

10 
as  an  expression  of  commitment  to  their  cause. 


Abigail  May  Alcott 

b.  October  8,  1800 
d.  November  25,  1877 

Abba  Alcott  has  left  less  of  a  written  record  of  her  years  at  the 
Wayside  than  her  husband.  Much  of  her  time  was  spent  mothering  her 
four  daughters  and  keeping  house.  She  also  endeavored  to  earn  money 
to  support  her  family.  She  placed  advertisements  in  the  local  news- 
papers for  students.  Unfortunately  few  answered  the  invitation.  On 

August  9,  1845,  she  wrote  to  her  brother,  Samuel  J.  May,  that  she 

11 
"engaged  a  little  scholar  for  $2  per  week."    She  took  in  a  fifteen- 
year-old  girl  who  was  intended  to  be  placed  in  a  mental  institution 

by  her  parents.  Instead,  they  arranged  for  Mrs.  Alcott  to  care  for 

12 
their  daughter  (Eliza  Stearns)  for  one  year,  for  $4  a  week.    In 

1848,  Abba  and  her  daughter,  Abby,  spent  the  summer  at  Waterford, 
Maine,  where  Abba  worked  at  a  health  spa  to  earn  money  for  her  fam- 
ily. 

Preparing  the  Wayside  for  repair  in  order  that  the  house  might  fetch 


10.  Lothrop,  pp.  69-70;  also  cited  in  HDS,  p.  19. 

11.  Abigail  May  Alcott  to  Samuel  J.  May,  Lothrop,  A,  VII,  park 
files. 

12.  Abigail  Alcott  to  Samuel  J.  May,  11/2/1846,  typescript  copy, 
MMNHP  files. 


20 


13 
a  good  price  also  consumed  Abba's  energies.         Because  of  her  hus- 
band's  inability  or  refusal    to  earn  any  money,  Mrs.  Alcott  assumed 
a  central    role  as  provider  for  the  family.     When  they  finally  sold 
the  house  and  moved  into  Boston,   it  was   her  decision  to  do  so.     Out 
of  necessity,  she  became  the  initiator  of  whatever  actions   the  fam- 
ily took. 

Anna  Bronson  Alcott 

b.     March   16,   1831 
d.     July  17,   1893 

The  oldest  of  the  four  Alcott  daughters,  Anna,  was  14  when  the  fam- 
ily moved  to  the  Wayside.  Records  of  her  actions  and  interests  are 
few.     She  enjoyed  playing  the  piano,  much  to  her  sister  Louisa's 

annoyance,   "She    [Annal   is  too  lazy  to  do  anything  but  drum  on  the 

14 
Seraphine  till   we  are  stunned  with  her  noise."         Anna  enjoyed  her 

studies.     She  noted  in  her  journal   on  February  18,   1846,   that,   "I 

15 
think  it  is   the  pleasantest  thing  I   do  to  read  German."         Like  her 

father,  Anna  became  a  teacher.     She  taught  her  sisters,  while  at  the 


13.     HGR,   p.   26 


14.  MMNHP  files,  MML  notes,  Hunt  X,  Annie  M.L.  Clark,  The  Alcotts 
in  Harvard  (J.C.L.  Clark,  1902),  p.  41.  The  letter  from  Louisa  is 
believed  to  be  from  the  Wayside. 

15.  Quoted  in  J.  Bonstelle  and  M.   de  Forest,  eds.,  Little  Women, 
Letters   from  the  House  of  Alcott,  MMNHP  files;   Lothrop,  p.   76 
notes  that  Anna's  German  teacher  was  George  Brandon. 


21 


Wayside,   and  the  Emerson  children  in  their  home.     Bronson  noted  in 

his  journal    that  "Anna  has  taken  her  sisters   into  the  school    room, 

16 
spends  hours  with  them  daily."         Anna's  journals  also  note  her 

enjoyment  of  long  walks  and  of  sewing.     Anna  spent  the  winter  of 

1847-48  in  Boston  with  her  cousin,   Elizabeth  Wells.     The  motive 

for  this  event  was   probably  the  Alcotts  need  for  money  and  their 

17 
inability  to  support  themselves. 

Louisa  May  Alcott 

b.     November  29,   1832 
d.     March  6,  1888 

Louisa  May  Alcott  was  twelve  years  old  when  her  family  moved  to 
the  Wayside.     Her  most  recent  biographer,  Martha  Saxton,  has  writ- 
ten a  perceptive  account  of  Louisa's  relationship  to  her  family, 
in  particular,  to  her  father.     There  was  friction  between  Bronson 
and  Louisa  stemming  from  her  inherent  free  spirit  and  boundless 
adolescent  energy,  and  his  insistence  upon  the  tractability  of  his 
daughters.     Throughout  most  of  her  youth,  Bronson  unfavorably  com- 
pared Louisa  to  her  older  sister,  Anna,  and  berated  her  independent 
nature.     Louisa  drew  close  to  her  mother  during  this  period.     The 


16.  ABA  Journal,  Tuesday,  September  29,   1846,  as   cited  in  park 
files. 

17.  Abigail   May  Alcott  to  Samuel   J.  May,  January  10,   1848,  MML 
notes,  Alcott  Family  Letters,   3,   1828-1861,  MMNHP  as  cited  in 
HGR,   p.   27. 


22 


two  frequently  communicated  by  means  of  journal  entries  and  notes. 
An  example  of  Louisa's  inner  struggle  is  the  March,  1846,  entry  in 
her  journal  which  was  intended  for  her  mother's  eyes: 

I  have  made  a  plan  for  my  life,  as   I   am  in  my 
teens  and  no  more  a  child. .. .People  think  I'm 
wild  and  queer;  but  mother  understands  and 
helps  me.     I   have  not  told  any  one  about  my 
plan:   but  I'm  going  to  be_  good.     I've  made  so 
many  resolutions,  and  written  sad  notes,  and 
cried  over  my  sins.... Now  I'm  going  to  work 
really,   for  I   feel   a  true  desire  to  improve, 
and  be  a  help  and  comfort,  not  a  care  and  sor- 
row,  to  my  dear  mother. 

During  her  years  at  the  Wayside,  Louisa  craved  privacy  and  free- 
dom to  develop  as  an  individual,  common  desires  for  an  adolescent. 
In  her  opinion,  a   room  of  her  own  was  a  great  victory: 


I   have  at  last  got  the  little  room  I  have 
wanted  so  long,  and  am  very  happy  about  it. 
It  does  me  good  to  be  alone,  and  mother  has 
made  it  very  pretty  and  neat  for  me.     My  work- 
basket  and  desk  are  by  my  window,  and  my  clos- 
et is  full   of  dried  herbs   that  smell    very  nice 
The  door  that  opens   into  the  garden  will   be 
very  pretty  in  summer,, and  I  can  run  off  to 
the  woods  when  I  like. 


Louisa's  joys  were  the  use  of  Emerson's  library,  long  walks  alone, 
writing,  and  producing  plays  in  which  she  and  her  sisters  and 


18.  Lothrop,   p.   57. 

19.  Ibid.,   pp.   56-57, 


23 


20 
their  friends  performed.    She  began,  while  at  the  Wayside,  to 

21 
show  the  literary  promise  that  came  to  fruition  years  later. 

During  the  summer  of  1848,  she  assumed  her  sister  Anna's  job  of 

teaching  the  Emerson  children.  They  often  had  their  lessons  in 

the  Wayside's  barn. 

Elizabeth  Sewell  Alcott 

b.  June  24,  1835 
d.  March  14,  1858 

Elizabeth  was  nine  when  her  family  moved  to  the  Wayside.  The 

journal  that  she  kept  during  her  residency  there  details  many  of 

the  activities  of  a  small  girl.  She  played  school  in  the  garret 

with  her  younger  sister  and  her  cousin.  She  enjoyed  her  school 

lessons  and  records  time  spent  in  the  family's  "school  room." 

Elizabeth  spent  a  lot  of  time  following  her  father  about  in  the 

gardens  at  the  Wayside.  In  May,  1846,  she  went  to  Walden,  the 

home  of  Bronson  Alcott1 s  friend,  Henry  David  Thoreau.  There, 

"Father  got  some  very  pretty  trees  to  set  out."  Three  days  later, 

she  "saw  father  put  the  pump  in  the  garden."  Elizabeth  also 


20.  Clara  Gowing,  The  Alcotts  As  I  Knew  Them  (Boston:  The  CM. 
Clark  Publishing  Company,  1909),  p.  1 3  as  quoted  in  park  files, 
recalls  that  the  materials  for  the  play  costumes  were  stored  in 
the  attic  at  the  Wayside.  One  costume  which  Louisa  made  and  wore 
herself  is  now  on  display  at  the  Orchard  House  next  door  to  the 
Wayside. 

21 .  Lothrop,  pp.  56-76. 

24 


helped  with  household  chores.  In  August,  she  "washed  the  napkins 

and  towels.  After  Dinner  I  ironed  and  made  a  little  bonnet  for 

my  doll."  In  addition  to  playing  with  her  doll,  Elizabeth  enjoyed 

reading,  writing  in  her  journal,  and  playing  cards  and  checkers 

22 
with  her  sister,  Abba. 

The  family  celebrated  Elizabeth's  twelfth  birthday  in  the  garden 
with  lights,  "music,  and  some  tableau  arranged  by  her  mother  and 
sisters,  and  to  which  her  little  friends  from  the  villaae  were 
invited.  The  effect  was  yery   pretty  and  gave  infinite  satisfac- 
tion to  the  little  company."  In  December,  1847,  Elizabeth  was 
sent  to  spend  the  winter  in  Boston  with  a  family  friend,  Miss 

Robie.  From  her  father's  description  of  the  event,  the  separa- 

23 
tion  was  not  voluntary,  but  financially  necessary. 

Abba  May  Alcott 

b.     July  28,   1840 

d.     December  29,   1879 

Abba  was  the  youngest  Alcott  child  and  only  four  years  old  when 

they  moved  to  the  Wayside.     Her  personal    records  of  her  occupancy 


22.  All   of  the  references  to  Elizabeth's  journal   are  from  the 
microfilm  copy  of  the  journal   at  MMNHP,  and  extracted  by  Robert 
D.   Ronsheim,  notes  in  park  files. 

23.  The  party  is  recorded  by  Bronson  Alcott  in  his  journal, 
June  24,   1847  and  guoted  in  Lothrop,   p.   54.     Elizabeth's  winter 
in  Boston  is  mentioned  by  her  father  in  a  letter  to  Anna  Alcott, 
December  10,   1847,   in  MML  notes,   Family  Letters,   1_,  and  guoted 
in  HGR,   p.   27. 

25 


are  fewer  than  those  of  other  family  members.     We  know  more  about 

Abba  from  the  observations  of  her  parents  and  sisters.     She  often 

played  with  her  sister,   Elizabeth,  who  recorded  the  events   in  her 

journal    (see  above).     Her  skill   at  drawing,  so  well   demonstrated 

during  her  adolescence  and  young  adulthood  at  the  Orchard  House, 

was  not  yet  developed  at  the  Wayside.     In  a  letter  to  his  wife, 

Bronson  describes  Abba  sitting  "with  her  feet  on  the  table  by  the 

window"  of  his  study.     Young  Abba  May's  energetic  presence  is  felt 

more  than  directly  expressed  at  the  Wayside.     Even  her  mother  omits 

mention  of  her  when  she  describes  her  daughters,   "My  girls  are 

doing  well,  Louisa  enjoying  the  season--weeds  with  her  father  like 

a  Trojan--Anna  sticks  to  the  books--and  Elizabeth  is  smiling  on 

every  thing  as  if  love  was  as  cheap  as  dirt."     Abba  accompanied 

her  mother  to  Waterford  in  1848.     The  family  thought  of  her  as 

24 
their  baby  and  frequently  referred  to  her  as  Abby. 

HAWTHORNE  FAMILY 

Residence  at  the  Wayside:     May,   1852  (purchased  in  March)--October, 
1868.     Between  July  6,  1853,  and  June  28,  1860,   the  family  lived 
in  Enqland  where  Nathaniel   Hawthorne  was  U.S.   Consul   stationed  in 
Liverpool,  and  in  Italy. 


24.     Postscript  by  ABA  in  a  letter  from  Abby  to  Abba  May  Alcott, 
July  5,   1848,   typescript  copy,  MMNHP  files.     There  is  some  con- 
fusion in  the  dating  of  this   letter  because  Abby  went  to  Water- 
ford  with  her  mother.     Mrs.   Alcott  returned  from  Waterford  on 
July  11  ,   1848;  Lothrop,   p.   49. 

26 


Nathaniel  Hawthorne 

b.  July  4,  1804 
d.  May  19,  1864 

Publications  during  residency  at  the  Wayside: 

The  Blithedale  Romance  published  July  14,  1852 

Campaign  biography  for  Franklin  Pierce,  published  September  11,  1852 

Wonder  Book  for  Girls  and  Boys  published  November  8,  1852 

Tanglewood  Tales  published  September  20,  1853 

The  Marble  Faun  published  February  28,  1860 

"Chiefly  About  War  Matters,"  Atlantic  Monthly  (July,  1862) 

Our  Old  Home:  A  Series  of  English  Sketches  published  September  15, 

25 
1863 

Works  begun  but  never  completed: 

Septimus  Felton 

Dr.  Grimshaw's  Secret 

The  Dolliver  Romance 

Hawthorne's  chief  activity  while  at  the  Wayside  was  his  writing.  He 
spent  several  hours  of  his  day  working  in  his  study.  According  to 
his  son,  Julian,  "in  the  afternoon  he  was  in  the  habit  of  strolling 
about  the  grounds  with  his  wife;  and  about  sunset  he  generally  as- 


25.  From  a  Hawthorne  Chronology  prepared  by  Robert  Derry,  MMNHP, 
July,  1981. 


27 


cended  the  hill    alone,  and  paced  to  and  fro  along  its   summit.... 

In  the  evenings  he  sat  in  the  1 ibrary--the  room  in  the  western 

wing  which  had  formerly  been  the  study;  and  here  he  either  read 

26 
to  himself  or  aloud  to  the  assembled  family." 

Hawthorne  kept  in  close  contact  with  his  literary  friends  and 
visited  them  in  Boston  more  than  they  visited  him  at  the  Wayside. 
Henry  W.   Longfellow,  for  example,  never  went  to  the  Wayside  until 
Hawthorne's  funeral.     Hawthorne  attended  the  monthly  dinner  of 
the  Saturday  Club  and  took  advantage  of  trips  to  Boston  to  visit 
his  publishers  and  personal    friends,  William  D.   Ticknor  and  James 
T.   Fields.     Hawthorne's  earnings  as  U.S.   Consul   gave  him  the  fi- 
nancial  security  to  devote  himself  to  writing  full    time. 

From  the  surviving  correspondence  between  Hawthorne  and  his  pub- 
lishers, Ticknor  and  Fields,  one  has   the  impression  that  while 
Hawthorne  cared  about  his  own  and  his   family's   financial  well-being, 
he  did  not  wish  to  be  directly  involved  in  his  financial   affairs. 
The  author  allowed  his  publishers   to  handle  all   of  his  transac- 
tions.    Hawthorne  drew  cash  from  them  against  his  royalties  as 
needed,  and  directed  them  to  pay  his  bills.     The  inventory  of  Haw- 
thorne's estate  shows  a  financially  secure  individual.     At  the  time 


26.     Julian  Hawthorne,  Nathaniel   Hawthorne  and  His  Wife   (New  York 
Anchor  Books,   1968,   reptd.    from  1884  ed.),   I,   268. 


28 


of  his  death  Hawthorne  had  assets  estimated  in  excess  of  $26,000. 

There  is  surviving  correspondence  in  the  Fields  Collection  at  the 

Boston  Public  Library  between  members  of  the  Hawthorne  family  and 

his  publishers  after  his  death  indicating  that  a  question  arose 

about  the  accuracy  of  the  publisher's  financial    records.     Whether 

this  was  the  sole  reason  for  Mrs.   Hawthorne's  financial   difficul- 

27 
ties  after  Hawthorne's  death  is  unclear. 

In  addition  to  his  lack  of  interest  in  directly  overseeing  his  fi- 
nancial  affairs,  Hawthorne  was  generous  to  his  friends  and  often 
lent  them  money.     Correspondence  between  Hawthorne  and  William 
Ticknor  on  May  26,   1861,   and  on  April    20,   1862,   indicates  that 
Hawthorne's   friend  and  fellow  Bowdoin  College  alumnus,   Horatio 

Bridge,  had  borrowed  a  substantial   sum  of  money  and  was  repaying 

28 
it.         During  his  lifetime,  Mrs.  Hawthorne  relied  on  her  husband's 

judgment  in  financial   matters.     It  is  quite  possible  that  a  full 


27.  See  various  typescript  copies  of  correspondence  between  Haw- 
thorne and  his  publishers  in  MMNHP  files;  cf.   Caroline  Ticknor, 
Hawthorne  and  His  Publisher  (Boston:     Houghton  Mifflin  and  Co., 
1913);  cf.   Fields  Collection,  Boston  Public  Library:     "Inventory 
of  the  estate  of  Nathaniel   Hawthorne,"  Middlesex  County  Register 
of  Probate  #33844,  typescript  copy,  MMNHP  files. 

28.  Typescript  copy,  MMNHP  files  quoted  from  Letters  of  Hawthorne 
to  William  D.  Ticknor,  1851-1864,   II,  pp.   115-118,  and  from  Ticknor, 
pp.   257,   280. 


29 


picture  of  Hawthorne's  financial    situation  was  realized  by  no  one, 
including  Hawthorne  himself. 

Hawthorne  read  widely.     A  catalog  exists  of  his   reading  while  liv- 
ing in  Salem.     From  this  we  may  gather  that  his   tastes  extended 
from  British  histories,  such  as  Edward  the  Black  Prince  and  A  Sta- 
tistical  Account  of  Scotland,  to  periodicals,  such  as  the  American 
Journal   of  Science,  the  Edinburgh  Review,  and  the  Gentleman's  Maga- 
zine.    He  kept  copies  of  Ticknor  and  Fields'   Atlantic  in  his  library 

29 
and  enjoyed  reading  The  Waverly  Novels  aloud  to  his  family. 

While  the  family  owned  the  Wayside  for  sixteen  years,  Hawthorne's 
feelings  toward  the  house  were  never  ebullient.     He  described  the 
house  to  his  friend  Evert  Duycknick,  as   "no  very  splendid  mansion, 
being  originally  a  farm  house  of  moderate  size  and  ante-revolution- 
ary date."     Hawthorne  was  unimpressed  by  Alcott's   improvements  to 
the  structure.     "Mr.  Alcott,  the  Orphic  Sayer,  of  whom  I   bought  it, 

had  wasted  a  good  deal   of  money  in  fitting  it  up  to  suit  his  own 

30  ' 
taste...."         After  his  death,  Sophia  revealed  that  Hawthorne  never 

cared  for  the  house  or  for  Concord.     In  a  letter  to  Annie  Fields, 


29.  Marion  L.   Kesselring  has   published  the  Salem  Athenaeum's   rec- 
ords of  Hawthorne's  Reading,   in  Hawthorne's  Reading,   1828-50  (New 
York:     New  York  Public  Library,   1949) . 

30.  Randall    Stewart,   Nathaniel   Hawthorne:     A  Biography  (New  Haven 
Yale  University  Press,  1948),  p.   123. 


30 


Mrs.  Hawthorne  confided  that  she  wished  to  hold  onto  the  Wayside, 

"but  then  comes  the  memory  of  his  distaste,  not  only  of  Concord, 

but  of  this  side  of  the  water  and  of  my  resolve  that  when  he  went 

on  his  last  journey,  that,  before  his  return,  I  would  find  a  house 

for  us  somewhere  by  his  beloved  sea,  and  that  he  should  NEVER  come 

31 
back  here  to  live,  no,  never." 

Throughout  their  marriage,  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Hawthorne  were  very   close. 
She  was  his  best  friend  and  wholehearted  supporter  of  his  work. 
His  letters  to  his  wife  and  to  his  friends  reveal  his  deep  affec- 
tion for  her.  During  their  courtship  and  various  separations, 

32 
Hawthorne  referred  to  his  wife  as  "my  Dove"  and  "My  Ownest."    In 

a  letter  to  William  Ticknor,  thanking  him  for  a  gift  of  cider, 
Hawthorne  comments  that  "We  [he  and  Sophia]  sit  down  quietly  to- 
gether, when  everybody  is  gone  to  bed,  and  make  ourselves  jolly 

33 
with  a  bottle  of  it."    Hawthorne  found  separations  from  his  fam- 


31.  Sophia  Hawthorne  to  Annie  Fields,  May  10,  1868,  MS  C.l.ll 
(131),  Boston  Public  Library. 

32.  See,  for  example,  letters  from  Nathaniel  Hawthorne  to  Sophia 
Peabody  reprinted  in  Malcolm  Cowley,  ed.,  The  Portable  Hawthorne 
(New  York:  Viking,  1948),  pp.  613-618.  Cowley  notes  that  Sophia 
delicately  inked  out  many  intimacies  in  the  correspondence,  but 
Randall  Stewart,  using  the  miracles  of  modern  paper  conservation 
techniques,  restored  the  elided  passages. 

33.  Hawthorne  to  Ticknor,  February  22,  1863,  typescript  copy, 
IP  files. 


31 


ily  unendurable.     While  on  a  vacation  to  Pride's  Crossinq  with 

Julian,  he  wrote  to  his  daughter,  Rose  (whom  he  called  "Bab"): 

"Dear  Bab,   I   am  very  homesick,  and  have  come  to  the  conclusion  that 

when  a  person  has  a  comfortable  home  of  his  own,  and  a  good  little 

Bab  of  his  own,  and  a  good  great  Onion    [his  name  for  Una],  and  a 

best  mama,  he  had  better  stay  with  them  than  roam  abroad.     Thank 

34 
Heaven  we  shall   return  on  Saturday." 

Despite  the  family's  obvious  pleasure  in  one  another's  company, 
their  years  at  the  Wayside  were  not  entirely  joyful.     Before  his 

death,  Hawthorne  suffered  two  great  losses  there.     His  sister, 

35 
Louisa,  was  killed  on  her  way  to  visit  the  Hawthornes.         Haw- 
thorne's friend  and  publisher,  William  D.  Ticknor,  died  suddenly 
while  the  two  were  on  a  journey  to  restore  Hawthorne's  health. 
Hawthorne,  who  interpreted  events  as  signs,  saw  the  losses  as  par- 
ticularly significant  portents  of  his  own  inexorable  death.     Even 
the  most  common  occurrences  in  his  life  were  meaningful    to  Haw- 
thorne.    When  his  maid  found  a  snake  in  the  Wayside's  attic,  Haw- 

36 
thorne  wrote  that  "It  seemed  a  fiend,  haunting  the  house." 


34.  Nathaniel  Hawthorne  to  Rose  Hawthorne,  Aunust  5,   1861,  as 
quoted  in  Lothrop,   pp.    121-122. 

35.  Sophia  Hawthorne  to  her  mother,  as  quoted  in  Julian  Hawthorne, 
Hawthorne  and  His  Wife,   I,  p.   454. 

36.  MML  notes,  Yale  VIII,   NH  manuscript,  June  9,   1853,   typescript 
copy,  MMNHP  files. 


32 


Hawthorne  returned  from  his  consulship  in  Enqland  and  his   travels 
in  Europe  terminally  ill.     He  was  justifiably  suspicious  of  mid- 
nineteenth-century  medicine  and  refused  to  consult  a  physician. 
His  life  at  the  Wayside  between  1860  and  his  death  in  1864  were 
marked  by  ever  lengthening  periods  of  debilitating  illness.     He 
was  unable  to  concentrate  on  his  writing  and  although  he  began 
several  works  during  this   period,   he  completed  none,  with  the  ex- 
ception of  his  Atlantic  article.     His  wife  sent  him  on  several 
vacations  for  recuperative  purposes,  but  they  obviously  did  no 

good.     He  died  in  his  sleep  on  May  19,   1864,  during  such  a  journey 

37 
with  his   friend,   Franklin  Pierce. 

Sophia  Peabody  Hawthorne 

b.     September  21 ,   1809 
d.      February  26,   1871 

Sophia  Hawthorne's  chief  activity,  while  at  the  Wayside,  was  car- 
ing for  her  family.  A  well-read,  socially-conscious  and  artisti- 
cally-talented woman,  she  subordinated  her  own  interests  to  those 
of  her  husband  and  family.     As  stated  above,   they  were  a  devoted 


37.     Hawthorne's   last  illness  is  documented  in  nearly  every  Haw- 
thorne biography  and  memoir.     The  exact  cause  of  his  death  is 
unknown  although  several   biographers,   including  Stewart  and  Arlin 
Turner,  speculate  that  evidence  strongly  points  to  stomach  cancer. 
Turner  also  mentions  the  possibility  that,   knowinq  his  death  was 
imminent,  Hawthorne  deliberately  left  his  home  to  protect  his  fam- 
ily from  his  final   suffering.     See  Arlin  Turner,  Nathaniel   Hawthorne 
(1979). 


33 


couple,    happiest   when   sharing  their   thoughts   or   taking  walks   around 
the  Wayside  property  together.      SoDhia   is   often  described   as   an   inva- 
lid  by  various   biographers   and   even   by  her   sister,   Mary  Peabody  Mann, 
in   a  letter   to   her   husband,    Horace. 38     While   it   seems   to   be   true 
that   she   suffered   chronic  migraine   headaches   throughout  much   of   her 
young   adulthood   and   early  marriage,   her   correspondence  during   her 
years   at   the  Wayside  does   not   contain  excessive   physical    complaints. 
Particularly  during  Hawthorne's   final,    long   illness,   Sophia   seems  to 
have   ignored   her  own   health   while  trying   to    improve  his. 39 

Mrs.    Hawthorne  enjoyed   drawing   and   painting.     As   a  girl,   she 
studied  with  Washington  Allston   "and   others   eminent   in   sculpture 
and   paintinq."40     Many  of  Mrs.    Hawthorne's   letters   are   illustrat- 
ed with   her   quick   sketches.      Her   sister  describes   her   as   always   im- 
pelled  to  draw   and   paint  when   she   could   anything  of  the   kind.      She   has 


38.  Mary  P.    Mann   to  Horace  Mann,   August   21,   1850,    Horace  Mann  Col- 
lection,  Massachusetts  Historical   Society. 

39.  None  of  Sophia  Hawthorne's    letters  that   I  examined    in   the   Boston 
Public  Library  (many  of  which  were  written   after   her   husband's   death) 
nor   references    in   the  HGR  or  HDS,   dwell    on   her   chronic   illness.     Her 
final    illness   in  London   is  minutely  documented  by  Una   in   a   letter   to 
her   brother,   reprinted    in  Julian  Hawthorne,   Nathaniel   Hawthorne  and 
His  Wife. 

40.  Edith  Garrigues  Hawthorne,   ed.,   The  Memoirs  of  Julian  Haw- 
thorne  (New  York:     MacMillan,   1938),    p.   47. 


34 


written  a  good  deal   of  poetry,   particularly  Scotch  poetry  for  which 

41 
she  has  quite  a  gift." 


Mrs.   Hawthorne  was  devoted  to  her  children.     "While  Rose  drew,   I 
read  aloud  to  her  the  "Miraculous  Pitcher,""  she  wrote  to  her  hus- 
band.    In  the  same  letter  she  instructed  Mr.   Hawthorne  and  Julian, 

who  were  vacationing  by  the  sea,   to  be  careful   not  to  take  a  chill 

42 
while  bathing.         Following  her  husband's  death,  her  letters  to  her 

friend,  Annie  Fields,  record  the  qreat  pleasure  and  sustenance  her 

children's  companionship  gave  her  during  her  widowhood. 

Every  Wednesday,  Mrs.   Hawthorne  was  "at  home"  to  callers  at  the 

Wayside.     She  recounts  a  visit  from  Mrs.   Emerson,  Mrs.   Brown,  and 

Elizabeth   (her  sister,  Elizabeth  Palmer  Peabody)    in  a  letter  to  Mr. 

43 
Hawthorne. 

The  years  followina  her  husband's  death  were  not  happy  ones   for 
Sophia.     Her  finances  dwindled  and  her  headaches   returned.     She 
agonized  at  the  thought  of  closing  the  Wayside  and  moving  to  Ger- 
many, her  son  Julian's  suggestion.     When  her  friend  Annie  Fields 
quit  answering  her  letters,   Sophia  felt  alone  and  rejected.     She 


41.  Mary  P.  Mann  to  Horace  Manr,,  August  21,   1850. 

42.  Sophia  Hawthorne  to  Nathaniel   Hawthorne,  July  30,  1861,  type- 
script copy,  MMNHP  files. 

43.  Ibid. 


35 


edited  her  husband's  papers  for  publication  in  an  effort  to  secure 

income.  Eventually,  Sophia  resolved  her  conflicting  emotions  about 

the  Wayside.  She  and  her  children  left  for  Dresden,  Saxony,  in 

October,  1868.  She  never  returned  to  America  and  died  in  England 

44 
three  years  later. 

Una  Hawthorne 

b.     March  3,  1844 

d.     September  10,   1877 

Una,   the  oldest  of  the  Hawthorne  children,  was  eight  years  old  when 
the  family  moved  to  the  Wayside.     Her  parents  named  her  for  the  nymph 
in  Edmund  Spenser's  The  Faerie  Queene.     Una  chronicles  her  own  activ- 
ities at  the  Wayside  in  a  letter  to  her  aunt,   Elizabeth  Hawthorne, 
on  June  29,   1863.     She  writes   that  her  friend,  Alice  Jackson,  came 
to  practice   [piano?]  with  her,  then,   "took  a  little  drive."     Visit- 
ing neighbors   for  tea  anc  croquet;  sewing  at  vestry;  boating;  par- 
ties, and  picnics  consumed  her  week.     While  Una  was   in  Italy  in 
1858,  she  contracted  a  near-fatal    illness.     Although  this   illness, 

Roman  malaria,   returned  in  the  summer  of  1860,  Una  recovered  and 

45 
resumed  her  activities. 


44.  For  a  brief  account  of  Sophia  Hawthorne's   feelings  following 
her  husband's  death,  see  HGR,   pp.   62-68.     Most  of  her  letters  con- 
cerning her  financial   condition  and  her  relationship  with  Annie 
Fields  are  in  the  Fields  Collection,  Boston  Public  Library. 

45.  Una  Hawthorne  to  Elizabeth  Hawthorne,  June  29,   1863,   type- 
script copy,  MMNHP  files;   Lothrop,   p.   108. 


36 


Una  often  helped  her  mother  around  the  house.     As  her  aunt,  Mary 

Mann  wrote  to  her  husband,  Horace,   "Mother  says  in  a  letter  today 

that  Una  is  very  domestic,  and  really  does  a  great  deal   to  help 

46 
in  the  family  affairs."         Una's   friend,  Annie  Bartlett,   recorded: 

"Yesterday  went  to  Unas.     She  was  cleaning  her  room  and  I  made  my- 
self useful    by  helping  her  bring  the  furniture  and  fixtures  back." 

At  her  mother's  wishes,  Una  and  Rose  did  not  attend  Sanborn's  co-ed 
school.     Mrs.   Hawthorne  taught  the  girls  herself  and  Una  had  a  tu- 
tor, George  Bradford.     Miss  Lothrop  quotes  a  letter  from  Una  to  her 

aunt  in  which  the  girl   describes  studying  Latin,   Italian,  arithme- 

47 
tic,  and  botany.         Una  enjoyed  socializing  with  the  boys  from  San- 
born school   whom  she  met,   presumably,  through  her  brother. 

In  June,  1862,   the  Hawthornes  gave  a  party  for  Una  at  the  Wayside. 

Mrs.  Hawthorne  describes   the  event  in  a  letter  to  Annie  Fields. 

They  decorated  the  house  with  roses  and  removed  the  furniture  from 

48 
several   downstairs   rooms  so  that  the  guests  could  dance. 

After  her  father's  death,  Una  "undertook  to  help  the  family  finances" 

49 
by  teaching  gymnastics.         Julian  Hawthorne's  biographer,  Maurice 


46.  Mary  P.  Mann  to  Horace  Mann,  August  21,  1850, 

47.  Lothrop,   pp.   111-112. 

48.  Ibid.,   pp.   115-116. 

49.  Ibid.,   p.   144. 

37 


Bassan,  notes  that  in  1868  Una  broke  off  a  romance  with  Storrow 

Higginson  because  he  was  beneath  her  station.     She  took  the  inci- 

50 
dent  very  badly.         Una  never  married.     She  stayed  with  her  mother 

in  Europe  after  her  sister  and  brother  returned  to  America  and  she 

died  in  England. 

Julian  Hawthorne 

b.     June  22,   1846 
d.     July  14,  1934 

Hawthorne's  only  son,  Julian,  was  six  when  the  family  moved  to  the 

Wayside.     In  a  letter  to  his  aunt,  Maria  Louisa  Hawthorne,   the 

small   boy  wrote  that  "Pappa,  mamma  and  I  went  to  Concord  on  Monday 

51 
to  see  the  house  in  a  sleigh.     I   liked  one  room  s/ery  much."         Most 

of  Julian's  memories  of  Concord  center  on  the  vigorous  social    life 

that  he  enjoyed  there  and  on  outdoor  activities.     Very  few  of  his 

recollections  involve  activities  performed  in  the  Wayside.     From 

Julian's  memoirs,  a  portrait  of  an  active  young  man  emerges. 

Julian  was  \/ery  close  to  his  father.     By  his  own  admission,  Nathaniel 
Hawthorne  had  a  profound  effect  on  him.     Julian  devoted  much  of  his 
adult  life  to  writing;  and  while  his  works  were  well -received  by  his 
contemporaries,  today  they  are  obscured  by  his  father's  works.     As  a 


50.  Maurice  Bassan,  Hawthorne's  Son  (Columbus:     Ohio  State  Univer- 
sity Press,   1970) ,   p.   45. 

51.  Ibid.  ,   p.   13. 


38 


small  boy,  Julian  stayed  at  home  and  was  tutored  by  his  parents. 
His  father  taught  him  Latin  and  Greek.  His  mother  tauqht  him  to 
draw.  While  in  Europe,  Julian  became  interested  in  the  art  of  il- 
lumination. He  continued  this  interest  at  Concord.  Sophia  men- 
tions several  of  Julian's  illumination  projects  in  her  letters  to 
Annie  Fields.  After  returning  from  Europe  in  1860,  Julian  attended 
the  Sanborn  school  in  Concord,  founded  by  abolitionist  John  Brown's 
partner,  Frank  Sanborn.  His  friends  from  the  school  were  Sam  Hoar, 
Wilkie  and  Bob  James,  Ned  Bartlett,  and  Frank  Stearns.  Julian  also 

visited  the  Alcott  girls  frequently.  Most  biographers  infer  that 

52 
he  had  an  unrequited  crush  on  May  (Abba  May)  Alcott. 

In  his  memoirs,  Julian  describes  himself  (during  his  adolescent  years 

53 
at  the  Wayside)  as,  "bashful  as  an  oyster,  and  shut  in  my  shell." 

In  fact,  he  socialized  with  others  frequently.  Julian  enjoyed  hiking, 
skating,  attending  masquerade  balls,  and  playinq  croquet,  and  swim- 
ming with  his  friends. 

Before  his  father's  death,  Julian  moved  to  Cambridge  to  attend  Harvard 
He  returned  to  the  Wayside  for  visits  frequently.  After  Hawthorne 


52.  Information  about  Julian  Hawthorne's  interests  is  taken  from 
Bassan;  Edith  Garrigues  Hawthorne,  ed.;  Julian  Hawthorne,  Hawthorne 
and  His  Wife;  Lothrop;  Stewart;  Saxton;  and  HDS. 

53.  Edith  Garrigues  Hawthorne,  ed.,  p.  81 

39 


died,  Julian  was  expelled  from  Harvard  in  1866  for  too  many  absences. 

He  returned  to  the  Wayside  during  the  winter  of  1866-67.  In  1867, 

Julian  returned  to  Cambridge  to  study  civil  engineering.  In  1868,  he 

moved  with  his  family  to  Dresden.  Part  of  the  trip's  purpose  was  to 

give  him  the  opportunity  to  study  at  an  engineering  school  at  Heidel- 

54 
berg. 

He  returned  to  America  and  married  Mary  Albertina  Amelung  in  New  York 
on  November  15,  1870.     In  1881-82,  Julian's  wife  and  their  six  chil- 
dren occupied  the  Wayside.     He  joined  his  family  there  in  the  spring 

of  1882.     At  the  time,   the  Wayside  was  owned  by  his  sister,   Rose  Haw- 

55 
thorne  Lathrop. 

Rose  Hawthorne  Lathrop 

b.     May  20,  1851 
d.     July  9,   1926 

Rose  Hawthorne  was  barely  a  year  old  when  her  family  moved  to  the  Way- 
side in  1852.     In  a  letter  to  her  mother,  Sophia  Hawthorne  describes 
her  "Rosebud,"  as  the  family  called  their  baby: 


I  wish  I   could  show  you  my  Rosebud:     She  is 
wholly  different  from  Una  &  Julian,  very  fa- 
cetious,  self  relying,  practical,  observant 
of  facts,  and  inconceivably  naughty,  and  wery 


54.  Bassan,  pp.  42-45. 

55.  Lothrop,   pp.   190,   194 


40 


bewitching,  on  her  cheeks  bloom  the  roses  of 
Sharon,  adown  her  neck  float  golden  sunbeams, 
her  eyes  are  blue,  sagacious,  with  very   long 
lashes,  and  a  charming  double  row  of  snowy 
teeth  shine  when  she  laughs,  her  figure  is 
round  and  rolling,  but  symmetrical,  her  face 
is  too  perfect  a  circle  and  she  jumps  straight 
up  and  down  on  two  of  the  straightest,  finest 
little  legs  ever  seen,  out  of  pure  joy  of  ex- 
istence, she  sings  like  Jenny  Lind,  and  judges 
us  all  like  a  Lord  Chancel  lor. .. .She  fails  in 
reverence,  and  excels  in  wit,  and  so  far  is 
wholly  irresponsible  in  her  actions.... I  never 
saw  such  a  child  in  my  life! 


When  the  family  returned  from  England,  Rose  attended  the  East  Quar- 
ter Public  School  in  Concord.  For  a  time,  after  her  father's  death, 

57 
she  attended  a  boarding  school  in  Lexington.    Her  mother's  letters 

to  Annie  Fields  record  Rose's  interest  in  arts  and  crafts.  With  her 

sister,  Una,  she  painted  decorations  on  household  items  to  sell  at  a 

58 
local  charity  fair. 

On  September  11,  1871,  Rose  married  George  Parsons  Lathrop.  They 
had  one  son,  Francis,  who  died  of  diptheria  when  he  was  five  years 
old.  The  Lathrops  had  bought  the  Wayside  and  were  living  there  dur- 
ing the  summers  at  the  time  of  Francis'  death.  They  did  not  wish  to 


56.  Stewart,  p.  125. 

57.  Lothrop,  pp.  112,  114 


58.  Sophia  Hawthorne  to  Annie  Fields,  Fields  Collection,  Boston  Pub' 
lie  Library  as  cited  by  Lothrop,  p.  144. 


41 


return   to   the  Wayside   after   that   tragic   event.     Julian  Hawthorne's 
family  occupied   the   house   before   it  was   sold   to   the  Lothrops. 59 

LOTHROP  FAMILY 

Residence  at  the  Wayside:  May,  1883-June  22,  1965 

Daniel  Lothrop 

b.  Auqust  11,  1831 
d.  March  18,  1892 

Daniel  Lothrop' s  presence  at  the  Wayside  is  not  well  documented.  We 

know  that  the  Lothrops  usually  arrived  for  each  summer  in  May  and 

stayed  until  November.  Winters  were  spent  in  Boston  where  Mr.  Lothrop 

operated  a  publishing  business,  D.  Lothrop  &  Company.  During  the 

summers  at  the  Wayside,  Lothrop  commuted  by  train  to  Boston.  Each 

evening,  Mrs.  Lothrop  and  their  daughter,  Margaret,  met  Lothrop  at  the 

train  in  Concord  in  a  carriage  driven  by  their  coachman. 60 

Mr.  Lothrop  and  his  wife  had  two  common  interests,  children's  lit- 
erature and  benevolent  societies.  After  a  varied  career  that  in- 


59.  Lothrop,    pp.   147-149. 

60.  Ibid.,    p.   163;    James  G.    Clark,   "The  Wayside,"   Saturday  Evening 
Spectator   (Minneapolis),    September  11,   1886,   p.    1  as   cited  by  HGR, 
p.    77.     Toogood   also   reports   that   MML,    in   an   interview  with   Robert  D 
Ronsheim  on  April   25,   1966,    recalled   that   the  coachman   performed   the 
duties   of   gardener   and   groundskeeper   as  well.     The  Lothrops   employed 
two  other   servants,    a  maid   and   a  cook. 


42 


eluded  owning  and  managing  drugstores  and  bookstores  in  New  England 

and  the  Midwest,  Lothrop  founded  his  publishing  company  in  Boston 

61 
in  1868.    He  dedicated  his  business  to  publishing  children's  lit- 
erature. His  firm  was  one  of  the  earliest  to  do  so.  Lothrop  met 
his  wife  through  his  publications  and  his  interest  in  securing  the 
work  of  new  authors. 

Lothrop  was  so  dedicated  to  his  juvenrle  literary  ventures  that  he 
published  one  magazine,  Wide  Awake,  at  a  $10,000  deficit  because 
he  felt  that  his  young  readers  benefitted  from  it.  His  other  regu- 
lar publications  included  Little  Men  and  Women,  Our  Pansy,  and 
Baby! and.  In  addition  to  knowing  most  contemporary  authors  of 
children's  literature,  Lothrop  also  knew  many  fine  illustrators 
whose  works  he  purchased.  Kate  Greenaway  and  Chi  1 de  Hassim  number 

among  MMNHP's  unusually  fine  collection  of  illustrations  which 

62 
Lothrop  commissioned  for  his  publications.    In  1874,  and  again 

in  1887,  while  he  owned  the  Wayside,  Lothrop  expanded  his  business. 

We  can  conclude  that  the  family  was  financially  secure  at  that  time, 

In  addition  to  his  publishing  business,  Lothrop  was  civically  ac- 
tive. In  1880,  he  founded  the  American  Institute  of  Civics,  an 


61 .  Dictionary  of  American  Biography,  "Daniel  Lothrop"  entry. 

62.  Lothrop,  pp.  153-154.  What  little  we  know  about  Daniel  Loth' 
rop  is  available  through  this  account. 


43 


organization  dedicated  to  the  spread  of  knowledge  of  politics  and  in- 
terest in  government.  He  was  also  a  member  of  the  Bostonian  Society, 
a  historical  organization  of  the  City  of  Boston. 63 

Lothrop  died  in  1892.  For  two  years  following  his  death,  his  wife 
managed  the  publishing  business  but  finally  sold  here  interest  in  it. 
Postcard  messages  from  Lothrop  to  his  wife  written  during  a  business 
trip  to  Chicago  and  New  York  indicate  that  his  health  might  have  been 
a  problem  as  early  as  1890.   In  the  messages,  Lothrop  assures  his  wife 
that  he  is  "feeling  unusually  well,"  "in  good  health  and  spirits,"  and 
stresses  his  "good  health  and  courage."  He  affectionately  adds  hugs 
in  the  form  of  "oooo"  for  Margaret. 65 

Harriett  Mulford  Stone  Lothrop 

b.  June  22,  1844 
d.  August  2,  1924 

There  is  a  real  need  for  a  biography  of  Harriet  Lothrop.  Her  work 

in  literary,  preservation,  and  benevolent  circles  is  noteworthy. 


63.  Dictionary  of  American  Biography.  Lothrop 's  framed  certifi- 
cate of  membership  in  the  Bostonian  Society  is  still  at  the  Wayside, 
Contact  with  the  Society  did  not  reveal  any  of  Lothrop' s  papers. 

64.  Daniel  Lothrop  to  Harriet  M.  Lothrop,  July  8,  1890;  July  7, 
1890;  August  21,  1890,  MS  Am  1491  (79),  Boston  Public  Library. 

65.  The  Concord  Enterprise,  March  25,  1892,  from  Orville  Carroll's 
research  notes.,  Concord  Public  Library  and  MMNHP  files. 


44 


Most  interesting  is  the  fact  that  her  biography  really  begins  when 
she  and  her  husband  purchased  the  Wayside.  At  that  point,  her 
life  took  shape  and  her  public  involvement  became  total.  Mrs. 
Lothrop's  nephew,  Roy  Griffin,  has  stated  that  she  was  a  "born 
actress.  She  loved  to  entertain  and  to  play  the  role  [of  a  gra- 
cious hostess] . " 

On  an  intimate  scale,  Mrs.  Lothrop  had  dinner  guests  almost  night- 
ly at  the  Wayside.  Her  daughter  remembers  "qood  conversation  and 

66 
music"  in  their  household.    Harriett  Lothrop  also  entertained  on 

a  grand  scale,  staging  pageants  at  the  Wayside  and  at  other  Concord 
historic  houses.  These  events  are  described  in  Appendix  B.  They 
are   important  records  of  taste  and  style  in  Victorian  entertainment 
and  historic  preservation. 

Like  residents  before  her,  Mrs.  Lothrop  spent  a  lot  of  time  writing 
at  the  Wayside.  Her  daughter  recalls  that  Margaret  Sidney  (her  pen 
name)  usually  wrote  during  the  day  and  relaxed  in  the  evenings.  Be- 
sides her  "Five  Little  Pepper"  stories  for  which  she  is  famous,  Sid- 
ney also  wrote  historical  fictions  about  the  Concord  area. 

Small  gatherings  of  various  clubs  met  regularly  at  the  Wayside.  The 
East  Quarter  Reading  Circle,  benevolent  society  meetings,  and  his- 


66.  Impromptu  interview  with  Roy  Griffin,  conducted  by  Doris  D. 
Fanelli,  the  Wayside,  Concord,  July  27,  1981. 


45 


toric  preservation  meetings  took  place  there  during  Harriett  Loth- 

67 
rop's  occupancy. 


Mrs.   Lothrop  also  devoted  her  time  to  charitable  organizations 

while  she  resided  in  the  Wayside.     She  was  an  elected  director  of 

the  Women's  Board  of  Missions,  and  Vice  President  of  the  Benevo- 

68 
lent  Society  connected  with  the  New  England  Conservatory  of  Music. 

Mrs.   Lothrop  was  very  involved  in  patriotic  organizations  and  his- 
toric preservation,   issues  that  were  linked  in  her  mind.     She  was  a 
regent  in  the  Daughters  of  the  American  Revolution  (until    1896)   and 

founder  of  the  Old  Concord  Chapter  of  that  organization.     In  1895, 

69 
she  founded  the  Children  of  the  American  Revolution.         In  addition 

to  her  own  home  which  she  saw  as  a  shrine  to  Hawthorne,  Mrs.   Lothrop 
was  active  in  the  preservation  of  two  neighboring  homes,   the  Ephraim 
Wales  Bull   house  (1899),   "Grapevine  Cottage,"  and  the  Alcott  resi- 
dence (1902),   "Orchard  House."     In  1904,  she  organized  a  three-day 

commemorative  celebration  of  Hawthorne's  100th  birthday,  the  Haw- 

70 
thorne  Centinary. 


67.     Lothrop,   p.   163 


68.  The  Concord  Enterprise,  January  17,  1890,  January  15,  1893,  as 
cited  in  MMNHP  files. 

69.  The  Concord  Enterprise,  September  17,  1896;  Lothrop,  p.  183. 

70.  The  Concord  Enterprise,  October  28,  1899;  April  12,  1900;  Loth- 
rop, p.  183;  The  Concord  Enterprise,  June  29,  July  6,  July  13,  1904 


46 


Mrs.   Lothrop's  other  principal    interest  was  her  daughter,  Margaret. 

Margaret  was  named  for  Mrs.   Lothrop's  pen  name,  Margaret  Sidney. 

As  Margaret  grew  up,  her  mother  took  her  on  many  trips  abroad  and 

71 
included  her  in  her  historic  and  preservation  activities. 

After  1900,  the  Lothrop  family's  visits  to  the  Wayside  became  less 
regular.     Mrs.   Lothrop  and  her  daughter  lived  at  the  Wayside  during 
the  winter  of  1899-1900.     The  summer  of  1900,  following  Margaret's 
graduation  from  Concord  High  School,   they  went  to  Europe.     They 
stayed  at  the  Wayside  during  the  winter  of  1900-1901   and  returned 
to  Europe  in  the  spring.     In  the  fall   of  1901,  Margaret  entered  col- 
lege and  Mrs.   Lothrop  lived  at  the  Wayside.     After  graduation  from 
college,  Margaret  moved  to  California  where  she  attended  graduate 
school   and  taught  at  Stanford.     Her  mother  visited  her  during  the 
winters.     Mrs.   Lothrop  also  traveled  abroad  a  great  deal   after  Mar- 
garet moved  to  California.     Her  tours  included  Egypt,  Palestine, 
England,  Norway,  and  the  Continent.     She  also  visited  her  friends 
throughout  the  country  and,  because  of  her  DAR  and  CAR  involvement, 

made  frequent  trips   to  Washington.     Mrs.   Lothrop  died   in  California 

72 
in  1924. 


71.  Margaret  and  her  mother  toured  Europe,  see  The  Concord  Enter- 
prise, June  14,  21,  August  2,  September,  1900,  as  quoted  in  MMNHP 
files. 

72.  Information  about  the  Lothrop  travels  is  available  in  the  Loth- 
rop Papers  stored  at  MMNHP;  from  notices  in  the  local  newspaper,  The 
Concord  Enterprise,  compiled  by  Orville  W.  Carroll;  and  in  HGR  and 
HDS.  The  summary  presented  here  is  taken  chiefly  from  HGR,  p.  82. 


47 


Margaret  Mulford  Lothrop 

b.  July  27,  1884 
d.  May  14,  1970 

Margaret  Lothrop  was   born   at   the  Wayside   and   that   building  was,    in 
many  ways,   the  single  focus  of  her   life.     Her  happiest  childhood  years 
were  spent   in  the  house.     She  was  deeply  devoted  to  her  parents   and 
the  Wayside  became  to  Miss  Lothrop  the  tangible  symbol    of  their   liter- 
ary and   social    ideals.     She  spent  most  of  her   life  researching  the 
structure  and   its  occupants   and   arranging  for  the  Wayside's  continu- 
ance  as   a  literary  shrine. 

In   1965,   when  MMNHP  formally  acquired   the  Wayside,   Miss   Lothrop' s 
longevity  and   her  propensity  for  historical    research  made  her  a   living 
link  between  Park  Service  historians   and  the  past.     As   a  child   she  had 
known  Emerson's  daughter,    Ellen,    Hawthorne's  children,   Julian   and 
Rose,    and  his   sister-in-law,   Elizabeth  Peabody  (see  Illustration  1). 
Through   her   parents'    literary   interests,   Margaret   also   knew  John 
Greenleaf  Whittier   and  Oliver  Wendall   Holmes.     Her  mother's  DAR  and 
CAR  interests  made  the  Lothrops  frequent  guests   in  Washington   and  Miss 
Lothrop  remembered   visiting  President   Benjamin  Harrison   in   the  White 
House.      In   addition   to   her   remembrances   of   her  own   exciting   life, 
Margaret  Lothrop  painstakingly  saved   documents   relating  to   the   Wayside 
and  devoted   long  years   to   primary  research   about   the  house's   former 
inhabitants. 73 


73.      Lothrop,    pp.    153-187;    HDS,    pp.   33-37 


48 


Clearly  the  thrusts  of  historiography  have  chanqed  since  Margaret 
Lothrop,  trained  as  a  sociologist,  began  her  research.  The  single 
largest  gap  in  the  Lothrop  manuscripts  at  MMNHP  are  the  personal 
records  of  herself  and  her  parents.  Virtually  none  of  her  father's 
personal  papers  are  in  public  repositories.  Only  papers  relating 
to  her  mother's  public  life  were  presented  to  MMNHP.  If  the  rec- 
ords of  her  parents  are  sparse,  the  personal  records  of  Margaret 
Lothrop  are  even  thinner.  Miss  Lothrop  saw  her  public  role  as 
distinct  from  her  private  self.  Believing  that  she  was  a  keeper 

of  the  past,  and  seeing  her  role  in  that  past  as  insignificant, 

74 
she  left  no  records  about  herself.    What  we  know  about  Miss  Loth- 
rop and  her  years  at  the  Wayside  we  know  from  public  newspaper  an- 
nouncements, and  from  a  few  personal  remarks  that  she  made  during 
interviews  with  Park  Service  personnel,  and  from  the  jacket  blurb 
on  the  only  book  she  published  about,  typically,  the  Wayside: 


Margaret  M.  Lothrop  was  born  at  The  Wayside, 
July  27,  1884.  In  her  early  years  she  trav- 
eled widely  in  the  United  States,  Europe, 
and  the  Middle  East. 

She  was  graduated  from  Concord  High  School, 
then  from  Washington,  D.C.'s  Sidwell  Friends' 
School,  and  from  Smith  College  in  1905.  She 
earned  her  Master's  Degree  from  Stanford  Uni- 
versity in  1914  where  she  later  taught  Soci- 
ology and  Penology. 


74.  Roy  Griffin,  in  an  interview  July  27,  1981  with  Doris  Fanelli 
disclosed  that  he  does  have  some  of  Miss  Lothrop' s  diaries.  These 
he  feels  are  "personal  things"  that  shed  no  light  on  the  house. 


49 


During  World  War  I  she  served  with  the  Stan- 
ford Unit  of  the  Red  Cross  in  France.  There 
she  saw  artillery  and  planes  in  action  and 
contracted  a  near  fatal  pneumonia  while  tak- 
ing dictation  from  wounded  soldiers. 

After  the  War  she  returned  to  teaching  at 
Stanford  until  she  accepted  a  job  in  San 
Francisco  as  Assistant  Director  of  the  Soci- 
ety for  the  Prevention  of  Cruelty  to  Chil- 
dren. 

Her  life  was  filled  with  many  interests  and 
many  famous  people  apart  from  the  world  of 
literature  and  of  Concord.  Exacting  in  her 
dedication  to  truth  and  keenly  interested 
in  scientific  research,  she  was  a  thoughtful 
and  generous  friend  to  fellow  men  of  all 
ages./b 


Miss  Lothrop  developed  her  personal  interests,  such  as  sociology, 
outside  of  the  context  of  the  Wayside.  Within  the  Wayside,  she 
played  a  recessive  role  to  her  mother's  dominance.  Mrs.  Lothrop 
was  a  very   independent  person  whose  ma tri local  view  is  betrayed 
in  her  explanation  of  the  characterizations  of  the  Five  Little 
Peppers: 


My  judgement  told  me  that  I  must  eliminate 
Mr.  Pepper,  because  the  whole  motif  "to 
help  Mother"  would  be  lost  if  father  lived. 
It  hurt  me  dreadfully.  He  was  a  most  estima- 
ble man,  and  I  loved  my  own  father  so  much, 
it  seemed  the  most  wicked  thing  to  do.  I 
went  around  for  days  feeling  droopyfiand 
guilty.  But  it  had  to  be  done.... 


75.  Lothrop,  jacket 

76.  Ibid.,  p.  172. 


50 


Harriett  Lothrop's  first  book,  The  Five  Little  Peppers  and  How  They 

Grew  (1880)  was  dedicated  to  her  mother.     Two  letters   in  the  MMNHP 

files  from  Mrs.   Lothrop  to  her  daughter  refer  to  an  "allowance" 

that  her  mother  regularly  sent  her.     Her  mother  signed  the  letters 

"Mamsie,"   the  name  of  the  mother  in  the  Five  Little  Peppers.     The 

letters  were  written  in  1917  when  Margaret  was  thirty-three  years 

old.     Mrs.   Lothrop  dedicated  The  Five  Little  Peppers  and  Their 

Friends   "To  my  daughter  Margaret,  who  to  her  friends  embodies    'Polly 

Pepper'    in  her  girlhood."     Margaret  was  twenty  years  old  at  the 

77 
time. 

As  CAR  member  Number  One,  Margaret  was  included  in  all  of  that  soci- 
ety's activities  at  the  Wayside.  In  fact,  photographs  and  press 
clippings  in  the  MMNHP  files  inform  us  that  "Miss  Margaret"  as  she 

was  called  by  the  members,  remained  active  in  the  organization  until 

78 
her  death. 

The  papers  that  Margaret  Lothrop  chose  to  give  to  MMNHP  describe  her 
associations  with  the  CAR,  the  DAR,  and  the  Wayside.  In  her  book, 
The  Wayside,  Miss  Lothrop  discusses  her  family's  ownership  of  the 


77.  "Harriett  Lothrop  Chronology,"  compiled  by  Robert  Derry,  Con- 
cord Public  Library;  Harriett  M.  Lothrop  to  Margaret  M.  Lothrop, 
MMNHP  files;  Derry,  "Harriett  Lothrop  Chronology." 

78.  HGR,  p.  82. 

51 


Wayside  as  a  backdrop  for  her  mother's  literary  and  preservation 
achievements.     Her  father,  who  died  in  1892,  receives  less  men- 
tion.    Margaret  portrayed  herself  as  the  center  of  only  those 
incidents  which  occurred  when  she  was  a  young  girl.     In  other 
incidents,  she  lingers   in  the  background,   giving  her  mother  cen- 
ter stage,  and  playing  her  mother's  favorite  theme,   "To  help 
mother."     This   is  the  way  in  which  Margaret  Lothrop  chose  to  be 
remembered. 


52 


Room -By- Room  Use  and  Activities 

This   section   presents   an    account   of  the   room  use   at   the  Wayside   and   of 
the   activities   of  the  residents   in   each   room.     The  Wayside   has   had 
many  structural    alterations   and   additions   during   its   various 
occupancies.      Some  of   the   activities   of   previous   residents   occurred   in 
rooms  that   no   longer  exist    in   the   present   house   plan.     The 
nomenclature  of   existing   rooms   and   the   use  of  those   rooms   has   also 
changed.     To  eliminate  confusion,   the   rooms   in   this   section   are 
grouped   according  to  the  Lothrop  family's   names   for  them.     All    known 
activities   are   uses   by  earlier   occupants   are   listed    in   each   section. 
All    references   to  floor   plans   are   to  those   at   the   end   of  this 
report. 

BAY  WINDOW   ROOM 

Original   Use:  Entry  hall,   original    portion   of  the   house. 

Alcott  Use:  The  Alcotts   continued   to   use  this   area   as   their 

entry  hall.      In   1847,   Mr.   Alcott   bui~!t   a  bay  out   of   the   front  wall    and 
placed   a  door   in  the  bay.     There   is   a  tradition  that   the  Alcott  girls 
played   "Pilgrim's  Progress"    (a  game  invented   after  John  Bunyon's 
allegory)   on   the   stairs. 79 


79.     HDS,   p.   75;    Lothrop,    p.   51;   Oliver  Bronson  Capen,   "Country 
Homes  of  Famous  Americans,"  Country  Life   in  America   (July,   1904), 
p.   282. 


53 


Hawthorne  Use:  The  Hawthornes   removed  the  door  in  the  bay  and 

made  it  a  window.     Mrs.  Hawthorne  referred  to  this  room  as  her  cha- 

80 
pel.     She  is  believed  to  have  tauqht  Sunday  school   here. 


Lothrop  Use:  The  Lothrops  used  this  room  as  a  playroom  for 

Margaret.     When  the  telephone  was  installed  in  this   room,  around 

1891,   the  family  beqan  to  refer  to  it  as  the   "Telephone  Room."     It 

is  also  called  "The  Oratory"   in  the  1915  inventory  (see  Appendix  C) 

because  a  book  about  the  house  referred  to  Mrs.   Hawthorne's  chapel 

81 
as   "the  Oratory." 

DINING  ROOM 

Original   Use:  This  room  could  have  been  used  as  a  kitchen,  a 

82 
bedroom,  or  as  a  hall/parlor  during  the  colonial   period. 

Alcott  Use:  A  reference  by  Mr.  Alcott  to  work  done  in  the 

parlor,   identifies  it  as  this  room.     The  family  received  guests  and 

83 
relaxed  here. 


80.     HDS,   p.   75 


81.  HDS,   p.   97;   Interview,  MML  and  Orville  W.   Carroll,  Auqust  2, 
1966. 

82.  For  a  discussion  of  early  colonial   architecture  and  room  use 
in  New  England,  see  Fiske  Kimball,   Domestic  Architecture  of  the 
American  Colonies  and  of  the  Early  Republic   (New  York:     Charles 
Scribner's  Sons,   1922) .     Kimball 's   figure  15A  (p.   33,   Dover  ed., 
1966)   shows  an  early  floor  plan  of  a  Connecticut  house  which  is 
the  same  plan  as  the  original   portion  of  the  Wayside. 

83.  In  his  journal,  October  22,  1846,  ABA  notes  that  he  closed 
the  bulkhead  under  the  east  window  of  the  parlor,  HDS,  p.   64. 


54 


ABA  Journal:  "January  Day's  Order,   1846,   reading  writing  and 

study  in  Parlor." 


ABA  Diary,   1848,  notes   that  his  daughters  are  very  busy  with  their 

84 
private  affairs   in  the  parlor. 


Hawthorne  Use:  This   room  was   probably  the  drawing  room  in  1852 

In  his  sketch   "The  Wayside"   in  Tanglewood  Tales,  Hawthorne  writes: 
"So  we  descended  the  hill    to  my  small,  old  cottage,  and  shut  our- 
selves up  in  the  southeastern  room,  where  the  sunshine  comes   in, 

85 
warmly  and  brightly,   through  the  better  half  of  a  winter's  day." 

Quite  possibly,  Hawthorne  had  this  parlor,  the  southeastern  room, 

in  mind.     After  the  new  drawing  room  was  added  in  1860,  this   room 

became  Julian's  bedroom.     Activities  in  this   room  when  it  was   the 

drawing  room  included  receptions  and  family  entertainments.     Mrs. 

Hawthorne  mentions  usina  Julian's  bedroom,  sans  furnishings,   for 

86 
Una's  party  in  1862. 


84.  Typescript  copy,   MMNHP  files. 

85.  Nathaniel   Hawthorne,  Tanglewood  Tales  (Boston:     Houghton  Mif- 
flin,  1900),   p.   239. 

86.  HDS,   p.   76;  In  a  letter  to  Annie  Fields  describing  Una's 
party  in  1862,  Sophia  Hawthorne  wrote,   "We  took  every  rag  of  fur- 
niture out  of  the  dining  room  and  Julian's  room  on  each  side  of 
the  chapel...,"  as  quoted  in  Lothrop,  p.   115.     This  statement 
locates  Julian's  bedroom  as  the  southeast  room. 


55 


Lothrop  Use:     The  Lothrops   used  this   room  as  a  dining  room.     "Daniel 
Lothrop  sat  at  the  south  end  of  the  table,"   recalled  Margaret  Loth- 
rop.    "After  Daniel   Lothrop's  death,  Harriett  Lothrop  sat  there." 
After  1900,  Mrs.   Lothrop  put  up  a  sign  in  this   room  indicating  that 

it  was  the  Hawthorne's  dining  room.     She  was  mistaken.     (See  below 

87 
for  location  of  Hawthorne  dining  room.)         Margaret  Lothrop  remem- 
bered,  "A  cousin,  slightly  older  than  I,  was   visiting  us  when  I  was 

four  years  old.     She  clearly  remembers   that  guests  were  almost  al- 

88 
ways  present  at  our  dinner  table." 


The  Lothrops  were  served  dinner  by  a  maid  who  was  summoned  by  a  bell 

89 
installed  under  the  dining  table  after  electricity  was   installed. 


KITCHEN 

Alcott  Use:       The  Alcotts  added  this  addition  to  the  house  in 
1845.  The  Northern  room  was  used  as  a  Bathing  Room.  The  Southern 
Room  was  used  as  a  woodshed  in  1845;  by  1852,  it  was  a  pantry  and 
wash  room.  In  a  letter  to  her  brother,  Mrs.  Alcott  says,  "We  moved 
up  the  best  half  of  the  shop--and  made  a  bath  house  and  wood  house 


87.  MML  interview,  May  2,  1967,  MMNHP  note  cards,  Park  files. 

88.  Interview  with  MML,  Winter  1965-66,  typescript  copy,  p.  4, 
MMNHP  files;  Lothrop.  p.  163. 

89.  See  "The  Wayside  Guide,"  written  by  MML  for  use  by  guides  in 
the  house,  copy,  MMNHP  files. 


56 


out  of  it... had  a  bathing  tub  and  shower  bath  fixed  with  weights 

and  pullies  so  that  even  Elizabeth  can  give  herself  a  bath  without 

90 
help." 


Hawthorne  Use:     This  room  had  been  partitioned  into  two  rooms 

by  Alcott  during  his  occupancy.  The  Hawthornes  used  the  northern 

room  as  a  Bathing  Room;  and  the  southern  room  as  a  Pantry  and  Wash 

Room.  Mrs.  Hawthorne  referred  to  the  north  room  as  a  "treasure  of 

a  bathing  room.... The  room  is  of  very  convenient  size,  &  we  shall 

have  no  burnt  elbows  and  sides  there  as  at  Newton."  The  southern 

91 
room  was  "an  excellent  pantry  and  wash  room." 

Wayside  School  Use:  Ronsheim  speculates  that  the  Wayside  School  for 

Girls  might  have  used  this  room  as  a  kitchen  "because  the  previous 

92 
kitchen  became  a  dining  room." 


90.  HDS,  p.  104;  Abigail  Alcott  to  Samuel  J.  May,  June  8,  1845,  MML 
notes,  Alcott  Papers,  Family  Letters,  1828-61,  MMNHP,  source  has  been 
checked.  It  should  be  noted  that  Victorians  distinguished  between  a 
bathing  room,  where  one  practiced  personal  hygiene  and  a  water  closet, 
where  one  eliminated  bodily  wastes.  For  a  discussion  of  these  room 
uses  and  their  changes  over  time,  see  Daniel  J.  Boorstin,  The  Ameri- 
cans, III,  The  Democratic  Experience  (New  York:  Vintage  Books,  1974), 
pp.  350-354.  By  all  accounts,  the  bathing  room  at  the  Wayside  did  not 
include  a  water  closet. 

91.  Sophia  Hawthorne  to  her  mother,  June  13,  1852  as  guoted  in  HDS, 
p.  70.  A  photocopy  and  a  typescript  copy  of  this  letter  are  in  the 
MMNHP  files;  the  original  is  in  the  Berg  Collection,  New  York  Public 
Library. 

92.  HDS. 


57 


93 
Lothrop  Use:  Food  storage  and  preparation,  laundry. 


MRS.   HAWTHORNE'S   PARLOR  OR  LIBRARY  OR  DRAWING  ROOM 

Hawthorne  Use:  Hawthorne  added  this   room  in  1860.     The  room  was 

94 
used  as  a  parlor  or  drawing  room  for  receiving  visitors. 

Lothrop  Use:  Used  as  a  library  during  the  early  years  of  their 

occupancy,  Mrs.   Lothrop  planned  to  convert  this  room  into  a  memorial 

95 
to  Mr.   Lothrop  after  his  death.         The  Lothrops   interchangeably  called 

this   room  the  Library,  the  Drawing  Room,  or  Mrs.   Hawthorne's  Parlor. 

Mrs.   Lothrop  received  her  guests   in  the  bay  window  of  "Mrs.  Hawthorne's 

Parlor  or  the  Library  as  HML  called  the  room  after  the  bookcases  were 

installed. .. .In  the  summer  time  or  whenever  receptions  were  held,  the 

96 
doors  were  temporarily  removed." 

OLD  ROOM 

Original   Use:  Probably  as  a  lean-to  kitchen;  possibly  as  an  ad- 

ditional  sleeping  room. 


93.  See  ADS,   interview  of  MML  by  Orville  W.   Carroll,   MMNHP  files. 
Cf.   HDS,   pp.    104-105. 

94.  HDS,   pp.    72-74. 

95.  ALS  Harriett  Lothrop,   #8940102,  MMNHP  files;  MML   in   interview 
April    24,  1967,  typescript,  MMNHP  files. 

96.  MMNHP  files   quoting  MML's   notes,   "Sitting  Room,"  January  29, 
1958  in  envelope  same,  box,   "Details  About  Rooms." 


58 


Alcott  Use:       The  Alcotts  used  this  room  as  a  kitchen.  Eliza- 
beth records  sweeping  the  kitchen  in  her  journal  and  playing  in  this 

97 
room  with  her  sister,  Abba. 


Hawthorne  Use:     The  Hawthornes  used  this  room  as  their  kitchen. 

A  letter  from  Mrs.  Hawthorne  to  her  mother,  June  13,  1852,  describes 

the  kitchen  as  "perfectly  sumptuous."  Sophia  even  includes  a  floor 

plan  of  the  room  in  the  letter.  In  addition  to  the  usual  food  prep- 

98 
aration,  the  Hawthornes  stored  their  outdoor  clothes  in  the  kitchen. 

Lothrop  Use:       This  room  is  designated  the  "Music  Room"  in  the 
1915  inventory;  it  is  called  the  "Old  Room"  in  the  1914  inventory. 
Miss  Lothrop  recalled  singing  around  the  piano  in  this  room  and  toast- 
ing marshmallows  in  the  fireplace.  She  also  recalled  popcorn  parties 

99 
in  this  room  during  her  high  school  years. 


97.  See  reference  in  a  letter  from  Mrs.  Alcott  to  Samuel  J.  May, 
June  8,  1845,  typescript,  MMNHP  files,  Elizabeth  Alcott  Journal, 
May,  June  5,  1846,  MMNHP  files  as  copied  from  Family  Correspondence, 
I ,  MML's  notes. 

98.  Sophia  Hawthorne  to  her  mother,  June  13,  1852,  typescript, 
MMNHP  files. 

99.  Orville  W.  Carroll  interview  with  MML,  August  8,  1966,  type- 
script, MMNHP  files;  May  1,  1967  interview,  typescript,  MMNHP  files. 


59 


LOWER  FRONT  HALL  OR  MAIN  HALLWAY 

Alcott  Use:         The  southern  part  of  this  space  was  used  as  a 
hall  with  stairs;  the  northern  part  was  a  portion  of  Louisa's  bed- 
room. 100 

Hawthorne  Use:  In  1860,  the  south  door  became  the  front  en- 
trance to  the  house;  the  doorway  was  cut  into  the  east  wall  to  give 
access  to  the  tower  addition;  the  door  in  the  north  wall  was  proba- 
bly closed.  The  Hawthornes  used  the  hall  as  an  entry  and  reception 
area  for  visitors;  as  a  passageway  between  the  downstairs  rooms  and 
for  stairway  access  to  the  second  floor  rooms. 

Lothrop  Use:         Same  as  the  Hawthornes ' .101 

PIAZZA  ROOM 

Alcott  Use:  Bronson  Alcott   built  this   addition   to   his   house 

Originally,    he  divided   it    into  two   northern   rooms   and   one   southern 
room.     The   southern   room  was  Alcott' s   study. 

"Jan  day's  order,   7-9  Reading,   writing   and   study  in  Study." 

"May  3,   read   to  Abba   in   the   study;   this   after   reading   at   breakfast 
table  parable  of  the  Vineyard,   Mary's   annointing  Jesus'    head;   Judas' 


100.      HDS,    pp.   91-92. 


101.   Interview  with  MML,  June  28,  1966,  pp.  9-14.  On  the  Hawthornes 
structural  changes,  see  ADS. 


(HI 


betrayal;    Peter's   denial.     Abba  very  much   delighted   &  so  ABA  and  Abba 
to   study." 

"Feb  3,   1848,   Put   my  Books   &  pictures    in  order    in   the  Study.     The 
paperer,    painter  &  carpenter   having   done  their  work   within   and 
without." 

In   1858,   the  Alcotts   occupied   the  Wayside  temporarily  while  their 
new  home  next   door  was    in   preparation.     They  occupied   only  the  west- 
ern wing;   the  Peabodys   occupied   the   remainder   of  the   house. 

"April    1,   1858,    'comfortably  placed'    at  Hillside.     Have  Hawthorne's 
study  and  two   adjacent   rooms   for   sleeping   apartments.     Meals   prepared 
and   taken   at  Orchard  House." 

"Sunday,   4,   April,    Find   few  of  H's   books   suit  me,   but   room   is   at- 
tractive. "102 

The   two  northern   rooms  were   used   as   bedrooms  for  the  Alcott   girls. 
Louisa  wrote   in  March,   1846,   "I   have   at   last   got   the   little   room  I 
have  wanted   so   long,    and   am  very  happy   about    it.... The   door  that   opens 
into  the  garden  will    be  s/ery  pretty   in   summer,    and   I  can  run   off   to 
the  woods  when   I    like."     This   would   be  the   northeast   room  because   of 
the  door  to   the   gardens   in   the   room. 


102.     All    of   above  quotations   from  ABA  Journal,   typescript,   MMNHP 
f i les. 


61 


Elizabeth  records,   "Sunday,  April    19,   1846,   Cleared  out  my  trunk 
and  sewed  a  little  in  Louisa's   room." 

Clara  Gowing  writes,   "In  the  west  L  each  of  the  two  older  girls, 

Anna  and  Louisa,   had  a   little  room  for  a  studio  all   her  own,   in 

which  she  reigned  supreme.     Louisa  loved  to  be  alone  when  reading 

or  writing,   and  a  door  from  her  room  opening  toward  the  hill    gave 

her  opportunity  to  slip  out  into  the  woods  at  her  pleasure."     This 

is  the  only  specific  reference  to  Anna's  room  being  next  to  Louisa's 

although  tradition  has  perpetuated  this  fact.     Elizabeth  wrote  in 

her  journal    that  she  "slept  with  Anna"  on  April    25  and  26,   1846. 

103 
This   implies  that  Anna  had  her  own  room. 

Hawthorne  Use:  The  Hawthornes  used  the  southern  room  as  a  study 

and  library: 

Mrs.   Hawthorne  wrote  to  her  mother:     "The  study  is  the  pet  room,  the 
temple  of  the  Muses  and  the  Delphic  shrine." 


Julian  Hawthorne  recalled:     "In  the  evenings  he    [Nathaniel   Hawthorne] 
sat  in  the  1 ibrary,--the  room  in  the  western  wing  which  had  formerly 


103.     Edna  D.   Cheney,   Louisa  May  Alcott:     Her  Life,   Letters  and  Jour- 
nals   (1930  ed.),   p.   36;   Elizabeth  Alcott's  Journal    (Family  Letters, 
I)  MML's   notes,  MMNHP;   Clara  Gowing,   The  Alcotts  As   I   Knew  Them  (Bos- 
ton:    The  CM.   Clark  Publishing  Co.),   pp.   3-4;   Elizabeth  Alcott  Jour- 
nal.    All   excerpts  from  typescript  notes,  MMNHP  files. 


62 


been  the  study;  and  here  he  either  read  to  himself  or  aloud  to  the 
assembled  family."     Quoting  Mrs.  Hawthorne,  Julian  added,   "he  is 
trying  to  write,  and  locks  himself  into  the  library  and  pulls  down 
the  blinds."     "The  following  winter  I    visited  him  again.... We  dined, 
and  after  dinner  we  retired  to  the  study  where  he  brought  out  some 
strong  cigars,  and  we  smoked  vigorously." 

R.H.  Stoddard,  poet,  wrote,   "After  tea,  he    [Hawthorne]   showed  me  a 
bookcase,  where  there  were  a  few  books   toppling  about  on  the  half- 
filled  shelves,  and  said  coldly,    'This   is  my  library'."     William 
Dean  Howells  wrote  of  Hawthorne's  illness,   "...so  that  in  the  morn- 
ing Mr.   Hawthorne  was  able  to  go  down   into  the  library,  where  I   had 
a  comfortable  lounge  placed,  and  all    day  he  lay  down  and  sat  up  a 
little,  with  constantly  decreasing  suffering." 

"My  father,   Nathaniel   Hawthorne,   had  about  five  hundred  books  when 

we  came  back  from  England  in  1860,   and  took  up  our  residence  in  the 

Wayside,   in  Concord.     That  is  my  guess.     They  were  never  cataloged, 

or  even  counted.     But  the  west  wing  of  the  little  house  had  been  done 

over  on  our  return,  and  the  ground  floor  room  was  fitted  with  book 

104 
shelves  and  called  the  library." 


104.     Sophia  Hawthorne  to  her  mother,  June  6,  1852,  Hawthorne  and  His 
Wife,  pp.   269,  326,  460;  William  Dean  Howells,  Literary  Friends  and 
Acquaintances,  p.   54;  Randall   Stewart,  "Hawthorne's  Last  Illness  and 
Death,  Mrs.  Hawthorne's  Letters  to  Mr.   and  Mrs.    Fields,"  More  Books, 
The  Bulletin  of  the  Boston  Public  Library  (October,  1944),  p.   308; 
Julian  Hawthorne,  Bookman,   61    (July,   1925),   p.   567;   all    from  quota- 
tations   in  MMNHP  files. 


63 


The  Hawthornes   used  the  northern  room  as   a  guest  room,   nicknamed 
"The  Bennoch  Room."     Hawthorne  had  removed  the  partitions  between 
the  two  northern  rooms,  making  one  large  room.     "One  of  the  addi- 
tions to  my  house  is  a  little  bit  of  a  library  and  adjacent  sleep- 
ing-room, which  I   intend  for  our  most  honored  and  welcome  guests, 

105 
and  have  christened  by  your  name--Bennoch's   Room." 

Lothrop  Use:  The  Lothrops  used  the  southern  room  as  a  library 

and  the  northern  room  as  a  summer  parlor  (called  the  "Piazza  Room"). 

In  1887,   the  Lothrops  built  the  piazza  on  the  west  side  of  the 

rooms.     Around  1906,  the  Lothrops   removed  the  partition  and  had  one 

large  room  which  they  used  as  a  parlor.     In  the  1915  inventory  it 

106 
is  designated  as  the  "drawing  room." 

PIAZZA   (WEST) 

This  porch  was  added  in  1887  by  Daniel  Lothrop.  MML  "remembers 

riding  her  velocipede  on  the  Piazza  floor  about  1889."  The  Lothrops 

used  this  porch  during  warm  weather  for  entertaining  and  relaxing. 

MML  recalls  a  maid  bringing  tea  to  the  piazza  where  Mrs.  Lothrop 

107 
would  serve  her  guests. 


105.  Nathaniel  Hawthorne  to  Bennoch,  December  17,  1860,  typescript, 
MMNHP  files. 

106.  Interview,  Orville  W.  Carroll  and  MML,  typescript,  MMNHP  files 

107.  Interview,  Orville  W.  Carroll  and  MML,  August  1,  1966,  type- 
script, MMNHP  files. 


64 


SITTING  ROOM 

Original   Use:  This   room  is   part  of  the  original    house.     The 

room  was   probably  used  as  a  bedroom  or  combination  parlor  and 

108 
sleeping  room. 

Alcott  Use:  By  elimination,   Ronsheim  rightly  considers   that 

the  Alcotts   used  this   room  as   their  dining  room  and  also  as   their 

109 
school   room.  Here  meals  were  taken  in  the  company  of  the  Alcott 

family's   varied  guests,  and,  when  not  in  use  for  meals,   the  Alcott 

girls  were  taught  here  by  their  father,  Miss   Ford,  and  their  oldest 

sister,  Anna. 


"September  29,  1846,  Anna  has  taken  her  sisters  into  the  school  room 

110 
and  spends  hours  with  them  daily." 


Elizabeth  Alcott's  diary,  April  29,  1846,  "Abba  and  I  played  in  the 
school  room;"  May  1,  1846,  "Father  came  into  the  school  room.  Day's 
order:  Study  in  School -room  till  twelve." 

May  10,  1846,  "Sun  came  into  the  school -room;"  June  22,  1846,  "I 

wrote  my  journal  in  the  evening  in  the  schoolroom,  with  Father,  by 

111 
candle-light." 


108.  See  Kimball. 

109.  HDS,   p.   64. 

110.  ABA  Diary,   20,   as  quoted  in  MMNHP  files  after  MML's   notes 

111.  Family  Letters   I,  MML's  notes  as   quoted  in  MMNHP  files. 

65 


From  May  Alcott  to  her  mother:  "My  Dear  Mother--0  mother,  it  is  so 

beautiful  this  morning  as  I  sit  in  the  schoolroom  by  Father;  such  a 

112 
bright  sunshine  all  about." 


Hawthorne  Use:     From  a  letter  written  by  Mrs.  Hawthorne  to  her 

mother,  we  know  that  the  Hawthornes  used  this  room  as  their  dining 

room.  Julian  confirmed  this  in  his  speech  at  the  Hawthorne  cente- 

113 
nary. 

Lothrop  Use:  The  Lothrops   used  this    room  as   a  sitting  room. 

This  name  is  given  as  early  as  1888  in  a  steam  heat  estimate.     Be- 
cause Harriett  Lothrop  had  the  room  painted  green  shortly  after  tak- 
ing possession  of  the  house  in  1883,   the  family  also  referred  to  the 
room  as  the  "Green  Room."     Here  the  family  relaxed  and  Mrs.   Lothrop 
wrote. 


112.  Caroline  Ticknor,  May  Alcott,  A  Memoir  (Boston,   1928),  pp.   27- 
28.     The  letter  was   dated  July  5,   1848. 

113.  Sophia  Hawthorne  to  her  mother,   June  13,   1852.     Mrs.   Hawthorne 
drew  a  map  of  her  kitchen  on  the  letter  and  keyed  parts  of  the  map 
to  her  description.     "No.   1   door,"   she  wrote,   "leads  to  the  dining 
room."     This   is   the  southwestern  door  of  what  is  now  the  Old  Room. 
Cf.   Sophia  Hawthorne  to  Annie  Fields,   cited   in  note  92.     Julian  Haw- 
thorne's pape^,   "Hawthorne's  Last  Years,"   states,   "A  room  was  added 
over  the  library;   another  in  the  rear  of  the  dining  room...."     He  is 
referring  to  the  tower  addition  in  1860,   Hiqginson,   ed.,   pp.    111-112, 
Julian's  paper  was  presented  at  the  Hawthorne  Centenary. 


66 


"At   the  right   of  the   entrance   is   an   antique  reception-room The 

green   room   is   to   the   right   from  the   entrance   hallway.      It    is   one  of 
the  original    rooms  of  the   cottage." 

"In   the  old   colonial    sitting  room,   Mrs.    Lothrop  wrote  many  of  the 
volumes  of   'The  Five  Little  Peppers,1   which   she  published  under  her 
pen   name,    'Margaret  Sidney'." 

"When   I   was   a  young   girl,    she   and   I   would   often   sit   in   front   of   the 

open  fire   in  the  old   sitting  room She  never  wrote   in   the  evening, 

but   sat   in   fron  of  the  fire,   rocking   and   thinking,   or   perhaps   read- 
ing. "H4 

EAST   CHAMBER 

Original   Use:  As   a  bedchamber. 

Alcott  Use:  By  tradition,   this   was   the  Alcott   girls'    bed- 

room.    All    four  girls   slept   here   until   Louisa   and  Anna  received 
their   own  room   in   1846.      Ronsheim  also   speculates   that   the   room 


114.     MML's   recollections   about   the   green   room's   name,    Sitting  Room 
envelope,   "Details  About  Rooms"   box,   January  29,   1958  as   copied   in 
MMNHP  files;   Theodore  F.    Wolfe,   Literary  Shrines   (Philadelphia,   J.B. 
Lippencott  Co.,   1896),   p.   60;   Margaret  McOmie,    "Wayside--Home  of 
Three  Authors,"   AAA  Travel    (May,   1933),   p.   2;   The  Concord  Herald 
(June  1,   1933),    all    quoted   in  MMNHP  files;   Lothrop,   pp.   173,   178. 


67 


might  have  been  used  by  the  Alcotts  as  a  quest  room.  Information 

115 
about  the  Alcotts1  sleeping  arranqements  is  scarce. 


Hawthorne  Use:     The  east  chamber  was  Rose  Hawthorne's  bedroom. 

It  is  believed  that  she  shared  the  room  with  Una  before  Una  re- 

116 
ceived  her  own  room  in  1860. 


Lothrop  Use:       Mr.  and  Mrs.  Lothrop  used  this  room  as  their 
bedroom  when  they  purchased  the  house  in  1883.  Mrs.  Lothrop  con- 
tinued to  use  the  room  after  Mr.  Lothrop  died  in  1892.  Margaret 

Lothrop  used  this  room  by  1905  when  she  graduated  from  Smith  Col  - 

117 
lege. 

GUEST  ROOM  OR  TERRACE  ROOM 

Hawthorne  Use:  The  Hawthornes  added  this   room  to  the  house  as 

part  of  the  1860  tower  addition.     They  used  it  as  a  quest  room. 

Ronsheim  speculates   that  it  might  have  been  used  by  President  Frank- 

118 
lin  Pierce,  Hawthorne's  friend. 


115.  Miss  Lothrop  believed  this  room  was  the  Alcott  girls'    room 
because  her  mother  told  her  it  was.     Harriett  Lothrop  heard  the 
story  from  the  Hosmer  girls,  acquaintances  of  the  Alcotts;  for  an- 
other viewpoint,   see  HDS,   pp.    59-60. 

116.  HDS,  p.  76. 

117.  MML  notes  on  room  use,  MMNHP  files;  also  from  interview,  MML 
and  Orville  W.  Carroll,  June  21,  1966,  typescript,  MMNHP  files. 

118.  HDS,  pp.  69-74,  108. 

68 


Lothrop  Use:       Mrs.  Lothrop  used  this  as  her  bedroom  around 

1906.  The  Lothrops  had  earlier  used  this  room  as  a  guest  room. 

119 
The  room  is  designated  the  "Terrace  Room"  in  the  1915  inventory. 

LARGE  BATHROOM 

Alcott  Use:  This   room  was  a  garret  during  the  Alcott  years. 

Ronsheim  speculates  that  this  was  the  Alcott  girls'    room  because  of 

120 
its  placement  over  the  warm  kitchen. 

Hawthorne  Use:  Hawthorne  finished  this  space  as  a  room  during 

his  occupancy.     Originally  it  was  one  large  room,  used  for  maids' 

121 
quarters. 

Wayside  School   Use:    It  is  possible,  but  not  documented,   that  the 
Wayside  School   partitioned  the  room  for  use  as  two  bedrooms. 

Lothrop  Use:  Presumed  converted  to  a  bathroom  when  town  water 

was  added  to  the  house  in  1883.     Miss  Lothrop  recalled  that  her  fa- 


119.  Interview  with  MML,  June  21,   1966,   typescript,  MMNHP  files; 
cf.   HDS,   p.   108. 

120.  On  Alcott's   use,  see  HDS,   p.   60. 

121.  HDS,  p.  74,  citing  Julian  Hawthorne's  paper,  "Hawthorne's  Last 
Years,"  as  quoted  in  Higginson,  ed.  The  Hawthorne  Centenary  Celebra- 
tion at  the  Wayside,  Concord,  Massachusetts,  July  4-7,  1904  (Boston, 
1905),   pp.   111-112. 


69 


ther  kept  weights  on  "the  north  wall,  west  of   [the]  window"   indi- 

122 
eating  that  the  room  was  used  for  exercise  as  well   as  hygiene. 


MAID'S   ROOM  AND  DRESSING  ROOM 

Alcott  Use:  Ronsheim  speculates  that  this   room  was  proba- 

bly the  Alcott  Girls'    room  (see  note  120). 

Hawthorne  Use:  Maid's   room.     Mrs.  Hawthorne  refers  to   "Ellen's 

chamber"   in  a   letter  to  her  mother  on  June  13,   1852.     In  1860,   the 

Hawthornes  remodeled  the  room  and  added  architectural    refinements 

123 
such  as  the  arched  ceiling. 

124 
Lothrop  Use:  Maid's   room;   later  as  a  dressing  room. 

NORTHEAST  CORRIDOR 

There  is  no  documentation  on  when  this  corridor  was   installed. 

Possibly,  the  Hawthornes   installed  it  around  1860.     The  corridor 

allows  access  to  the  north  rooms  of  the  second  floor  and  to  the 

125 
kitchen,  without  disturbing  the  occupants  of  the  south  rooms. 


122.  HDS,   p.   82;  Miss  Lothrop  gives  her  opinion  on  this   in  an  in- 
terview with  Robert  D.   Ronsheim,  August  19,   1966,   draft,   typescript, 
p.   25,  MMNHP  files;  weights   are  mentioned  in  an   interview  with  MML, 
May  1,   1967,   typescript,  MMNHP  files. 

123.  Sophia  Hawthorne  to  mother,  June  13,   1852.     See  Julian  Haw- 
thorne's  paper,   cited  in  note  127,   for  1860  improvements. 

124.  Interview,  MML  and  Ronsheim,  June  16,   1966,   draft,   typescript, 
pp.   36-37. 

125.  HDS,   p.   114. 

70 


NORTHWEST  CORRIDOR 

This  corridor  was  added  to  "provide  access  from  Una's   room  and  the 

126 
guest  room  in  the  tower  to  the  bath"  when  it  was  added  in  1884. 


SMALL  BATHROOM 

127 
Alcott  Use:  Uncertain,  possibly  a  quest  room. 

128 
Hawthorne  Use:  Possibly  the  maid's  or  cook's   room. 


Lothrop  Use:  Originally,  during  the  Lothrop  occupancy,  this 

room  was  the  "Man's   room  for  winter  use."     Harriett  Lothrop  convert- 
ed it  into  a  bathroom  and  cut  the  door  between  this   room  and  the 

Maid's  room  to  the  west.     Miss  Lothrop  believed  the  room  was  con- 

129 
verted  in  1910. 

TOWER  STUDY 

Hawthorne  Use:     Hawthorne  built  the  tower  in  1860  and  used  it 

as  a  study.  He  also  entertained  friends  there. 


126.  HDS,  pp.  81-82;  Interview,  MML  and  Orville  W.  Carroll,  Au- 
gust 16,  1966,  typescript,  MMNHP  files,  MML  thinks  the  corridor  was 
installed  by  the  Lathrops. 

127.  HDS,   pp.   60-61. 

128.  HDS,   p.    76. 

129.  Interview,  MML  and  Ronsheim,  August  19,  1966,  draft,  type- 
script, MMNHP  files. 


71 


"Business  is  now  so  dull  that  I  should  think  you  might  find  time  to 
come  and  smoke  a  cigar  with  me  in  this  comfortable  room." 

"I  am  writing  this  note  in  my  new  study." 


"I  spend  two  or  three  hours  a  day  in  my  sky-parlor...."  ABA  re- 

130 
cords,  "Sat  a  while  with  Hawthorne  in  his  tower." 


Gray  Use:         It  is  not  known  for  what  purpose  the  Grays  used 

the  tower.  The  painted  murals  on  the  vaulted  ceiling  are  signed 

and  dated  by  G.A.  Gray,  1871. 

131 
Wayside  School  Use:  The  tower  was  used  as  a  bedroom. 

Lothrop  Use:       Kept  as  a  memorial  to  Hawthorne. 

UNA'S  ROOM 

Hawthorne  Use:     The  Hawthornes  added  this  room  in  1859  as  a  bed- 
room for  Una.  No  record  exists  about  specific  activities  in  this 

room.  We  can  presume  that  sleeping,  dressing,  perhaps  studying  and 

132 
reading,  took  place  here. 


130.  Hawthorne,  December  9,  1860,  Ticknor,  pp.  247,  256;  ABA  Diary, 
1860,  35.,  December  8,  1860,  excerpts  from  typescript  notes,  MMNHP 

f i 1 es . 

131.  HDS,  p.  80,  cites  source  as  ABA  Journals,  49_  (1874),  p.  676; 
55  (1875),  pp.  143-160. 

132.  HDS,  p.  73;  Lothrop,  p.  103. 


72 


Lothrop  Use:       The  1915  inventory  describes  this  room  as  the 

"Blue  Room."  The  Lothrops  so  designated  this  room  because  its 

walls  were  painted  in  shades  of  blue.  They  used  this  room  as  a 

133 
guest  room. 

UPPER  COLONIAL  ENTRY 

This  was  the  original  second  floor  hall  of  the  oldest  portion  of 
the  house.  It  functioned  as  a  hall  between  bedrooms  and  as  a 
stair  landing  between  the  first  floor  and  the  attic. 

UPPER  FRONT  HALL 

Lothrop  and 

Hawthorne  Uses:  This  hall   was   built  by  the  Hawthornes   in  1860 

and  used  as  a  passageway  between  the  rooms.     From  this  hall,  ac- 
cess  is  gained  to  Una's   room,   the  guest  bedroom,   the  tower  study, 
the  northwest  passage,  and  the  Hawthorne  chamber. 

WEST  CHAMBER  OR  HAWTHORNE  BEDROOM 
Original    Use:  As  a  bed  chamber. 

Alcott  Use:  By  tradition,   this  was  Mr.   and  Mrs.  Alcott's 

chamber. 

Elizabeth  Alcott's  journal: 

April    22,   1846,   "Sat  in  Mother's  chamber  to  sew." 


133.     Interview,  Orville  W.   Carroll   and  MML,  August  15,  1966,  type- 
script, MMNHP  files. 


73 


Thursday,  April    23,    "After  dinner  sewed  &  knit  in  mother's   chamber. 

May  5,   1846,   "After  dinner  Abba  &  I   played  house  in  mother's   cham- 
ber." 

May  16,   1846,    "We  sat  in  mother's   chamber  and  wrote." 


ABA,   October  5,   1846,   "Set  an  air  tight  stove  in  our  chamber,   for 

134 
retirement  in  wintry  days." 


Hawthorne  Use:  By  tradition,  as  Mr.   and  Mrs.   Hawthorne's  bed- 

135 
room. 


Lothrop  Use:  The  1915  inventory  designates  this  the  "Hawthorne 

136 
Room."     This  was  Miss  Lothrop' s  bedroom  when  she  was  a  child. 


134.  MML's   notes,   Family  Letters,    I,  MMNHP  files;   ABA's   Diary,   20 
(MML's   notes,   MMNHP  files). 

135.  HDS,   p.    109. 

136.  MML  notes,  MMNHP  as  cited  by  HDS,  p.  109. 


74 


EVIDENCE  OF  ORIGINAL   FURNISHINGS 

Introduction 

The  following  furnishings  evidence  is  drawn  from  a  variety  of  sources. 
Two  inventories  of  the  Wayside's  furnishings  exist,  from  1914  and 
1915  when  Harriett  Lothrop  rented  the  property.     There  are  numerous 
photos  of  the  rooms  as   they  were  furnished  during  Mrs.   Lothrop 's   1883- 
1924  occupancy,   and  more  recent  photos  which  corroborate  the  earlier 
visual   evidence.     Among  the  Lothrop  family  papers  at  MMNHP,  are  HML's 
notes  from  travels  abroad.     These  notes  list  the  sources  of  purchases 
which  later  decorated  the  Wayside.     Margaret  M.   Lothrop  kept  detailed 
records  of  nearly  every  item  in  the  house.     Her  handwritten  notes 
made  over  a  thirty-year  period,  plus  transcriptions  of  oral    inter- 
views with  her  by  Park  Service  historians  between  1960  and  1970,  have 
been  invaluable  to  this  study.     We  must  remember  that  oral    interviews 
lend  a  sense  of  immediacy  to  historical    research,  but  they  are  not 
factually  infallible.     Miss  Lothrop  and  her  mother  preserved  informa- 
tion about  the  Wayside's  collection  as  it  was  presented  to  them.     The 
accuracy  of  their  data  still   must  be  tested  against  other  contemporary 
accounts  of  objects,  and  against  subsequent  research.     Additional 
sources   for  this  section  are:   contemporary  furnishings  catalogs,  the 
Hawthorne  and  Alcott  papers,  and  recent  decorative  arts   research. 

The  Wayside  furnishings  came  from  several   sources.     One  should  bear 
in  mind  that  the  Lothrops  used  the  Wayside  as  a  summer  residence  and 

75 


such  homes  frequently  became  repositories  for  items  that  do  not  con- 
form to  the  lifestyle  of  a  formal   winter  residence.      Daniel    Lothrop 
kept  furniture  from  his   first  marriage  at  his  Concord  home.     Furni- 
ture from  D.   Lothrop  &  Company's  offices  and  retail   store  were  also 
moved  to  the  Wayside  after  Lothrop' s  widow  sold  the  business   in  1894. 
Mrs.   Lothrop  inherited  furniture  from  her  family  and  she  kept  much 
of  it  at  the  Wayside.     Durinq  her  lifetime  HML  made  an  effort  to  pur- 
chase objects  with  a  Hawthorne  provenance.     Unfortunately,   no  bills 
of  sale  survive  and  tradition,  corroborated  at  times  by  the  Hawthorne 
papers,  is  the  only  evidence  we  have. 

HML  also  purchased  objects  with  a  Concord  association  for  her  own 
home  and  for  her  preservation  projects  in  the  area.     Listed  in  ear- 
lier inventories,  some  of  these  items  are  now  dispersed. 

MML  continued  her  mother's  practice  of  acquirinq  antiques   until   she 
qave  her  home  to  the  Park  Service.     Consequently,  when  the  house  be- 
came public  property  in  1965,   it  was   fully  furnished  with  objects 
selected  and  documented  by  the  Lothrops. 

Miss  Lothrop  is   responsible  for  the  Wayside's  preservation.     Her  ef- 
forts are  acknowledged  by  the  Park  Service  which  maintains  objects 
she  acquired  to  relate  the  house's  story. 

Photographs  taken  between  1883  and  1924  indicate  that  the  Lothrops 
frequently  rearranged  objects   in  the  house.      (The  Lothrops  were  a 


76 


busy,  active  family  and  that  movement  reflects   their  lives.)     This 
makes  definite  placement,  of  especially  the  smaller  items,   rather 
arbitrary.     When  MML  recalls  an  object  "always"   in  a  particular 
location,   I  have  placed  it  there  and  noted  the  reason.     In  other 
instances  placement  of  items   in  a  particular  room  is  based  on  an 
inventory  or  a   photoqraph. 

Time  constraints  did  not  permit  me  to  carefully  evaluate  every 
item  in  the  Wayside.     Miss  Lothrop's  descriptions  are  reliable  for 
an  object's   traditional   associations,  and  MMNHP's  catalog  is  re- 
liable for  gross   descriptions   such  as   color  and  measurements.     Nei- 
ther provides   the  detailed  description  necessary  for  complete  iden- 
tification of  an  object's  time  and  place  of  manufacture.     With  the 
exception  of  cataloger  Cordelia  Snow's  excellent  ceramic  and  glass 
identifications,  I   have  relied  on  the  catalog  cards  only  for  mea- 
surements,  color,  and  transcriptions  of  marks  and  labels.     My  con- 
clusions about  a  specific  item,   its  composition,  source,  value, 
and  appropriateness  are  based  primarily  on  my  own  examination  of 
the  object,  photos  of  the  object,  my  knowledge  of  comparable  ob- 
jects, and  on  primary  records  of  contemporary  items. 

Throughout  this  section,  objects   are  arranged  room-by-room.      Rooms 
are  grouped  by  floor  and  listed  within  each  group  in  alphabetical 
order.     I   have  endeavored,  where  possible,   to  list  each  object  by 


77 


its  NPS  catalog  number,  and  have  also  included  Miss   Lothrop's 
catalog  number,   if  known.     The  latter  entry  reads   "MML  #x."     This 
will   allow  future  researchers   to  trace  an  object  in  MML's  filing 
system. 


78 


Room-By- Room  Furnishings  Evidence 

BAY  WINDOW  ROOM 

Telephone 

The  original,  crank  telephone  was  mounted  near  the  door  on  the  west 

1 
wall  between  the  window  and  door. 

Furniture 

TABLE,   NPS  #2034;  MML   "Table  #5."     A  marble-topped,  mid-nineteenth 

century  table.     MML  believed  that  this  belonged  to  D.L.     This 

is   listed  in  the  1914  inventory. 

TABLE,  NPS  #2033;  MML  "Tables  6B."     Matches  #2034. 

SECRETARY   (DESK  AND  BOOKCASE),  NPS  #2018;  MML   "Desks   #1."     This   is 

seen  in   Illustrations  4   (1922)   and  5  (1937).     Mrs.   Lothrop 

acquired  this  from  a  dealer  who  explained  in  a  letter  that  he 

showed  the  piece  to  Mary  Peabody  Mann  who  affirmed  that  it 

was  in  the  Wayside  when  she  lived  there.     The  desk  was  sold 

2 
at  auction  in  1868.     HML  acquired  it  in  1908. 

Prints,   Paintinqs 

PHOTOGRAPH,  NPS  #2242.     Sepia-toned  photograph  of  the  Sistine  Chapel 
by  Michelangelo.     Depicts  the  Last  Judgment. 


1.     MML/Carroll    interview,  Auqust  2,   1966,   transcription,   Draft,   p.   48, 
IP  files. 


2.     MML  notes,  typescript  copy  of  letter,  MMNHP  files 

79 


BAY  WINDOW  ROOM 

PHOTOGRAPH,  NPS  #2786.  Black  and  white,  hand-colored  photograph  of 

Venice.  Italian  label.  Probably  purchased  by  HML  on  her 

trip  to  Italy. 

PHOTOGRAPH,  NPS  #2312.  "Madonna  di  Foligno"  by  Raphael.  Stickers 
on  reverse  of  the  frame  indicate  that  Mrs.  Lothrop  purchased 
it  abroad  and  had  it  framed  in  Boston.  It  is  listed  in  the 
1914  inventory. 

PHOTOGRAPH,  NPS  #2286;  MML  #16.  "Fondheim  Cathedral."  Colored 

photo.  HML  purchased  this  in  Norway.  It  hung  in  the  room 
in  1914. 

Metals 

VASE,  NPS  #2563.  Also  listed  in  the  1914  inventory.  A  "brass  and 
copper  pitcher."  This  is  probably  the  flower  container  visi- 
ble in  Illustration  4  (1922). 

Textiles 

CURTAINS.  The  1914  inventory  lists  "4  green  curtains."  These  are 

seen  at  the  windows  in  the  1922  photograph,  Illustration  4. 

The  park  now  uses  reproductions  of  the  original  curtains. 

"2  SMALL  GREEN  TABLE  COVERS."  These  are  also  listed  in  the  inventory, 
but  nothing  is  known  of  these  today. 

80 


BAY  WINDOW  ROOM 

"3  SHADES  FOR  WINDOWS."  These  were  present  in  addition  to  the  cur- 
tains. A  shade  is  visible  in  Illustration  5.  The  park  has 
no  original  shades.  MML  noted  that  HML  sometimes  hung  a  cur- 
tain between  this  room  and  the  sitting  room  to  keep  the  heat 

in  the  latter  room.  There  is  no  documentation  of  the  cur- 

3 
tain's  appearance. 

Lighting  Devices 

"2  TALL  GREEN  CANDLESTICKS/2  RED  CANDLES."  These  were  listed  in 

the  1914  inventory  along  with  the  information  that  the  sticks 
were  pottery.  It  is  difficult  to  speculate  further  about 
what  they  were.  The  contrasting  red  candles  do  provide  some 
information  about  HML's  taste. 

Brackets 


"1  TALL  BRACKET  ON  WALL/1  SMALL  BRACKET  ON  WALL."  MML  recalls  that 
these  were  wooden  brackets  which  HML  used  to  hang  plants  in 
the  bay  window.  They  are  missing. 

Books 


In  an  interview  with  MML,  winter,  1965-66,  she  mentions  that  some  of 
the  Peppers  books  were  kept  in  this  room  (see  Illustration  4). 


3.  Carroll/MML  interview,  Auaust  2,  1966,  transcription,  Draft, 
p.  50,  MMNHP  files. 


DINING  ROOM 

Furniture 

SIDEBOARD,  NPS  #2009;  MML  "Bookcase  #2."  Miss  Lothrop  believes  that 
Mrs.  Lothrop  told  her  this  was  a  Hawthorne  piece  and  barely 
remembers  seeing  the  top  section.  The  bottom  is  shown  in  Il- 
lustration 8  in  the  northeast  corner  of  the  room.  There  is 
no  further  documentation  on  the  Hawthorne  provenance. 

TABLE,  NPS  #2006;  MML  "Tables  #22"  Gateleg.  MML  states  that  "During 
HML's  day  it  stood  in  the  SE  corner  of  the  dining  room  diago- 
nally .  .  .  ."  She  believed  HML  purchased  it. 

TABLE,  NPS  #2001;  MML  "Tables  #2."  In  1914,  it  was  noted  that  the 
leaves  were  missing.  Mrs.  Lothrop  bought  it  at  a  Concord 
sale.  It  is  said  to  have  been  the  table  of  Deacon  Parkman, 
who  served  under  the  Reverend  Ezra  Ripley.  The  surface  is 
badly  marred  and  Miss  Lothrop  believes  that  her  mother  would 
have  kept  it  covered.  It  is  not  covered  in  the  1922  photo- 
graph, Illustration  8,  in  which  it  is  against  the  north  wall. 
It  does  not  appear  in  earlier  photographs  of  this  part  of  the 
room. 

TABLE,  NPS  #2007;  MML  "Tables  #1."  This  is  a  mid-nineteenth-century 

extension  dining  table.  HML  told  MML  that  she  and  DL  purchased 
this  table  from  Rose  Hawthorne  Lathrop  in  1883.  Mrs.  Lathrop 
maintained  that  this  was  Mr.  Hawthorne's.  It  has  always  been 
the  Lothrops'  dining  table. 

82 


DINING  ROOM 

CHAIRS,   NPS  #2002,   #2003,   #8429;  MML   "Chairs   #16."     These  are  visi- 
ble in  Illustration  9   (1888)   and   in  Illustration  8  (1922). 
In  1915,   "2  arm  chairs/3  small   dining  chairs"  were  listed  in 
the  inventory.     Location  of  the  armchairs  is  unknown. 

CHAIR,   NPS   #2051;  MML   "Chairs  #5."     Daniel    Lothrop's  desk  chair 
from  his  office.     Brought  to  the  Wayside  after  his  death. 
HML  sat  in  it  at  the  head  of  her  dining  table. 

CHAIR,  NPS  #2564;  MML  "Chairs  #8."     Black,   "Hitchcock-type"  Windsor 
with  stencilled  crest  rail.     MML  bought  this  chair  in  1934 
from  Mr.  Herbert  Nealey  who  said  it  came  from  Humphrey  But- 
terick's  attic.     It  was  in  the  dining  room  when  the  Park 
Service  acquired  the  Wayside  in  1965. 

Ceramics  &  Glass 


PLATTER,  NPS  #1639;   MML  #42.     Transfer-printed  creamware.     The  1915 
inventory  lists   "1   antique  blue  oblong  platter  on  wall."     This 
may  be  one  visible  on  the  wall    in  the  1922  photograph   (Illus- 
tration 8) . 

PLATE,   NPS  #1640;  SOUP  PLATE,   NPS  #1638.     Creamware  plates,  marked, 

"Saxon  China."  A  "gilt  and  white  plate"  is  listed  in  the  1915 
inventory;  a  "gold  and  white"  plate  is  listed  in  1914.  Possi- 
bly #1640  is   the  same  plate. 


83 


DINING  ROOM 

PLATE,  NPS  #1646;  MML  #26.  Faience  plate  with  image  of  St.  Malo. 

HML  purchased  it  in  1907.  In  1915,  it  hung  on  the  wall. 

4 
HML  often  hung  plates  on  the  wall. 

PLATTER,  NPS  #1636.  Delft.  Purchased  in  Brittany  in  1911  by  HML 

TEAPOT  LID,  NPS  #1584.  Chinese  export  porcelain.  Blue  and  white 
with  strawberry  knop.  No  other  reference. 


SAUCER,  NPS  #1585 

SAUCER,  NPS  #1586 

BOWL,  NPS  #1588  Hardpaste,  Chinese  export  porcelain 

SAUCER,  NPS  #1589 

SAUCER,  NPS  #1590        with  "HNM"  monogram.  Part  of  a  set 

SAUCER,  NPS  #1591 

SAUCER,  NPS  #1592        given  to  Henry  and  Nancy  Mulford  (HML's 

SAUCER,  NPS  #1593 

BOWL,  NPS  #1595  relatives)  by  an  uncle,  A.  Mulford, 

SAUCER,  NPS  #1601 

PLATE,  NPS  #1603         c.  1830. 


CAKE  PLATE,  NPS  #1624     Bought  to  complete  HNM  set  but  do  not 

CAKE  PLATE,  NPS  #1625 

CAKE  PLATE,  NPS  #1626     exactly  match.  Chinese  export,  initialed 


4.  MML  interview,  Winter,  1965-66,  transcription,  p.  4,  MMNHP  files 


84 


DINING  ROOM 

SOUP  PLATE,  NPS  #1609 

SOUP  PLATE,  NPS  #1610 

SOUP  PLATE,  NPS  #1612     Chinese  export  porcelain,  blue  and  white 

DINNER  PLATE,  NPS  #1613 

DINNER  PLATE,  NPS  #1614    MML  "China  #40,"  says  this  is  part  of  a 

SAUCER,  NPS  #1615 

SAUCER,  NPS  #1616        set  that  belonged  to  her  mother's  family 

SAUCER,  NPS  #1617 

SAUCER,  NPS  #1618        In  the  1930s,  she  took  the  nicer  pieces 

SAUCER,  NPS  #1619 

SAUCER,  NPS  #1620        to  California  to  sell. 

SAUCER,  NPS  #1621 

SAUCER,  NPS  #1622 

SAUCER,  NPS  #1623 


BOWL,  NPS  #1656.  English  salt  glaze.  Believed  listed  as  "blue 
veqetable  dish"  in  1915  inventory. 

PLATE,  NPS  #1663.  Austrian.  Believed  purchased  by  HML  on  a  trip 
to  Europe. 

FLOWER  POT,  NPS  #1671;  MML  "Extra  #47."  TIN  CONTAINER,  NPS  #1736. 

Listed  in  1915  as  "1  Delft  jardinere  or  to  use  for  fruit/ 

Has  inner  dish."  In  1914,  it  was  a  fern  dish.  HML  bouqht 

it  and  used  it  as  a  centerpiece.  MML  recalled  that  her 

mother  often  kept  this  in  the  center  of  the  table  when  she 

5 
entertained.  She  kept  a  plant  growing  in  it. 

PITCHER,  NPS  #1680;  MML  "Extra  #49."  MML  says  the  object  has  been 
at  the  Wayside. 


Ibid. 


85 


DINING  ROOM 

DISH,  NPS  #8133.  Marked  "Semi -Chi na ,  England,  Ridgways." 

JAR,  NPS  #2480.  Glass,  one  of  pair.  The  1915  inventory  lists  "cut 
glass  oil  bottle/cut  glass  vinegar."  Perhaps  this  is  one. 

MUG,  NPS  #2451.  Bears  portrait  of  Lord  Baden  Powell.  It  was  pur- 
chased in  England  by  HML. 

Paintings,  Prints 

CHROMOLITHOGRAPH,  NPS  #2054.  Listed  as  "2  large  chromes  sheep  and 

cattle,"  in  1914  and  1915.  Visible  in  photos  of  the  room. 

The  other  is  #2179;  both  are  marked  "Christian  Mali,  MUnchen." 

CHROMOLITHOGRAPH,  NPS  #2556;  MML  #25.  "Asking  A  Blessing."  Miss 
Lothrop  associates  it  with  this  room  in  her  childhood,  and 
thinks  it  might  have  been  connected  with  her  father's  pub- 
lishing house. 

PRINT,  NPS  #2225.  Listed  in  1915  inventory.  No  other  information 
available. 

"OXFORD  COAT  OF  ARMS,"  NPS  #1738;  "CAMBRIDGE  COAT  OF  ARMS,"  NPS 
#1737.  Tin.  HML  brought  these  back  from  Europe  and  hung 
them  in  the  dining  room. 


86 


DINING  ROOM 

PLATE,  NPS  #1747;  MML  "Extra  #28."  Pewter.  Listed  in  the  1915  in- 
ventory. MML  recalled  a  pewter  plate  hanging  on  the  south 
wall  or  on  the  east  wall  of  this  room.  Perhaps  this  plate 
hung  in  both  places  at  different  times. 

HORSESHOE,  No  NPS  number;  MML  "Extras  #8."  HML  told  MML  that  she 
and  her  husband  found  a  horseshoe  and  nailed  it  up  when  they 
first  moved  to  the  Wayside.  This  might  be  that  horseshoe, 
nailed  to  the  mantel  where  MML  always  remembered  it. 

TRAY,  NPS  #2728.  Brass  rim  and  handles,  wooden  bottom.  Believed  to 
have  been  here  during  HML's  time. 

FLOWERPOT  HOLDER,  NPS  #1723.  Silver  plate,  German.  Presumed  here 
during  HML's  time. 

Lighting  Devices 

CANDLESTICKS  (PAIR),  NPS  #1771,  NPS  #1772;  MML  #1.  Listed  in  1914, 
1915  inventories  and  visible  in  Illustration  8  (1922).  MML 
says  they  have  been  in  the  house  for  many  years,  on  the  man- 
tel. 

BOBECHE  (PAIR),  NPS  #8239,  NPS  #8240.  Dutch,  softpaste  porcelain 
marked:  "25/F/Deft/F;"  "JT  &  LO." 


87 


DINING  ROOM 

ELECTRICAL  FIXTURES.  Four  fixtures,  with  pendants  are  attached  to 
the  wall.  These  were  used  by  HML.  They  have  no  cataloq  num- 
bers and  have  always  been  in  their  present  location. 

Heating  Devices 

BRASS  STAND  FOR  FIREPLACE  EQUIPMENT,  NPS  #1793.  Part  of  a  set  that 

belonged  to  HML.  MML  does  not  remember  date  or  location  of 

purchase. 

FIRE  SHOVEL,  NPS  #1801;  MML  "Fireplace  Equipment  #18."  Belonged  to 
HML. 

FIREPLACE  FENDER,  NPS  #1810;  MML  "Fireplace  Equipment  #16."  Pierced 

brass  with  claw  feet.  HML  mentioned  purchasing  a  new  brass 

6 
fender  in  a  letter  to  her  daughter  in  1899.   This  is  listed 

in  the  1914  inventory  and  appears  in  the  1922  photograph, 

Illustration  8. 

ANDIRONS  (PAIR),  NPS  #1805,  NPS  #1806.  MML  #21.  Shown  in  1922  photo 
MML  thinks  they  belonged  to  her  mother's  family. 


6.  MMNHP  files,  MS  #8990519 


88 


DINING  ROOM 

Accessories 

BREAD  AND  CHEESE  TRAY,  NPS  #1830;  MML  "Extra  #2."  Mahogany,  marked 
"G.  Good."  HML  purchased  this  in  England.  Seen  on  gateleg 
table  in  1922  photo.  Also  listed  in  1914  inventory. 

Manuscripts 

"AMERICA,"  NPS  #2356.  Four  verses  of  "America"  signed  "S.F.  Smith 
written  in  February  1832/July  3,  1893."  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Smith 
were  freguent  dinner  guests  at  the  Wayside.  The  manuscript 
is  framed. 


LABEL  COPY.  After  1900,  HML  put  up  label  copy  (signs)  in  this  room 

7 
which  designated  it  (wrongly)  as  the  Hawthorne's  dining  room. 


Textiles 

RUGS.  From  1899  until  at  least  1915,  HML  had  an  "Axminster"  or 

"Wilton"  carpet  in  this  room.  Although  these  are   different 
types  of  carpets,  people  frequently  confuse  them.  At  present, 
the  room  contains  a  wool  rug  with  floral  designs  (a  "domestic" 
oriental).  This  was  given  by  MML  but  there  is  no  record  of 
its  history.  The  rug  visible  in  the  1922  photo,  Illustration 
8,  could  be  an  Axminster,  but  specific  identification  is  impos- 
sible. 


7.  Interview,  MML,  Winter,  1965-66,  p.  4 


89 


DINING  ROOM 

PORTIERE.  Across  the  cupboard.  Suspended  by  a  metal  or  brass  rod 

with  brass  ends.  An  Art  Nouveau  design  is  visible  in  the 

1922  illustration. 

KITCHEN 

Lighting 

In  an  interview  with  Orville  W.  Carroll,  August  9,  1966,  MML  states 

that  HML  was  responsible  for  the  placement  of  the  drop  electric 

light  bulbs.  She  also  placed  the  wooden  trough  or  raceway  next  to 

the  sink  and  installed  the  shelf  on  the  west  wall  of  the  stairway. 

Furniture 

STOOL,   #10348.     Given  by  MML. 

CHAIR,   NPS  #2547.     Ladderback. 

Because  they  had  hired  help,  the  Lothrops  probably  did  not  spend  a 
lot  of  time  preparing  their  own  meals  and,  consequently,  MML's  mem- 
ories of  the  kitchen  might  not  have  been  complete.     MML  did  not  keep 
extensive  notes  about  items  in  the  kitchen.     The  most  reliable  source 
of  information  about  the  kitchen  is  the  1915  inventory.     Historian 
Ronsheim  used  this  and  a  post-1924,   undated   inventory  as   the  basis 
for  his  draft  on  furnishings.     He  checked  many  of  the  items  against 
contemporary  Sears,  Roebuck  and  Montgomery  Ward  catalogs  for  dating 
and  descriptions,   and  compared  the  1915  inventory  with  MML's   inven- 


90 


KITCHEN 

tory  of  furnishings  that  she  prepared  before  she  gave  the  Wayside  to 
the  Park  Service.  Ronsheim's  draft  forms  the  essence  of  Furnishings 
Evidence  for  the  Kitchen.  The  objects  are  presented  in  the  order  in 
which  they  appear  in  the  1914  inventory.  I  have  added  additional  in- 
formation where  possible.  In  most  instances,  utensils  for  food  prep- 
aration and  housekeeping  can  only  be  tentatively  identified  as  those 
mentioned  in  the  1914-15  inventories.  All  of  the  objects,  like  those 
in  the  rest  of  this  report,  were  Lothrop  possessions.  The  1915  in- 
ventory does  not  distinguish  between  the  areas,  "kitchen"  and  "pan- 
try." It  is  assumed  that  the  heading  "kitchen"  groups  items  from 
both  areas.  Specific  placement  of  objects  in  the  room,  particularly 
smaller  cooking  utensils,  is  conjectural. 

"2  TABLES,"  NPS  #2698;  MML  #15.  "Kitchen  table  with  one  leg.  Proba- 
bly one  that  was  in  the  Wayside  kitchen  since  Lothrops  have 
been  here  .  .  .  ."  MML  notes  that  the  table  had  a  "linoleum 

cloth  taked  [sic]  on  it."  Possibly,  this  was  the  "white  oil 

8 
cloth  cover"  mentioned  in  the  inventory.   The  second  table 

mentioned  in  the  inventory  has  not  been  located.  "Green  oil- 
cloth, also  white  oil  cloth  cover,"  probably  refers  to  mate- 
rials tacked  onto  the  table  tops. 


8.  MML  notes,  MMNHP  files 


91 


KITCHEN 

"CLOCK."  No  further  documentation 


"RED  ANTIQUE  WOODEN  SMALL  CHAIR,"  NPS  #2020;  MML  #13. 

9 
"RED  BIRD  CAGE  WINDSOR  BOUGHT  BY  HARRIETT  LOTHROP  FROM  MRS.  CLARK." 

"SMALL  RATTAN  &  WOOD  CHAIR,"  NPS  #2010;  MML  #18.  MML  referred  to 
rush  seats  on  "rattan  plaited  seats."  Bought  by  HML.  Pur- 
ported to  be  "A  Manning  Chair,  from  Mrs.  H.'s  mother—proba- 
bly in  the  house  when  Lothrops  bought  it."  There  is  no  cor- 
roboration for  this. 

"SMALL  RATTAN  WOOD  ROCKING  CHAIR."  Three  possible  candidates:  MML 

#37.  Green  rocker  with  woven  reed  seat.  MML  recalled  the 

10 
chair  on  the  piazza  in  good  weather. 

NPS  #2441;  MML  #39.  A  ladderback  converted  to  a  rocker.  The  reed 
seat  was  worn. 

NPS  #2096;  MML  #29.  Rocker  with  wicker  seat  and  back.  Design  on 
the  crest  rail  supposedly  painted  by  Mrs.  Hawthorne.  Her 
granddaughter  told  MML  that  she  had  seen  a  chair  which  Mrs. 
Hawthorne  had  painted  that  looked  like  this  one. 


9.  MML  annotated  inventory,  MMNHP  files 
10.  MML,  Ibid. 


92 


KITCHEN 

"LINOLEUM  FLOOR  COVERING."  A  fragment  of  linoleum  with  a  geometric 
design  was  found  by  MML  in  1959  when  she  moved  an  old  coal 
stove.  This  piece  probably  dates  to  the  Lothrops1  early  own- 
ership. MML  recalled  that  the  floor  was  varnished  during 
some  of  her  girlhood;  she  could  not  be  more  specific.  The 
linoleum  probably  antedates  the  varnish  because  the  floor 
under  the  linoleum  is  not  finished.  A  reproduction  of  this 
linoleum  is  now  in  the  kitchen. 

"2  KHAKI  WINDOW  CURTAINS  (TWO  PAIRS)."  "Khaki  curtain  to  door  of 
store  closet"  (presumably  the  pantry  next  to  the  door  to  the 
Old  Room).  Although  reproduction  curtains  are  now  in  use, 
MMNHP  has  no  record  of  the  original  curtains. 

"REFRIGERATOR,"  NPS  #10346;  "Extra"  MML  #28.  The  icebox  was  patented 
in  1911.  MML  notes  that  it  was  used  in  the  kitchen  and  later 
in  the  "Refrigerator  Room"  south  of  the  kitchen.  A  hole,  for 
drainage,  in  the  floor  of  the  room  marks  the  icebox's  place- 
ment. Although  the  icebox  was  in  the  south  room  in  1924,  it 
is  presently  displayed  in  the  kitchen  where  visitors  can  see 
it. 


93 


KITCHEN 

"ICE  CREAM  FREEZER."  Cannot  locate.  For  example,  see  Ice  Cream 

11 
freezer  in  1902  Sears  catalog.    Sears  offered  two  models, 

"Shephard's"  and  "The  Blizzard"  in  a  variety  of  sizes. 


"CLOTHES  FRAME."  Cannot  locate.  This  is  probably  a  wooden  rack 

12 
for  drying  laundry  indoors.  See  Sears  "Clothes  Bar." 


"3  STONE  JUGS  FOR  MOLASSES  &  VINEGAR."  Not  located.  The  reference 
indicates  large  capacity,  stoneware  jars.  These  jars  were 
available  through  large  mail-order  houses,  such  as  Sears 
(see  p.  798).  (Pre-1892  when  steam  pottery  was  introduced, 
stoneware  was  also  available  through  small,  local  potteries.) 

"CLOTHES  LINE."  Original  is  missing. 

"LARGE  BLUE  AND  WHITE  PITCHER."  Not  located. 

"TIN  CLOTHES  BOILER/FOOT  TUB."  Possibly  NPS  #2743. 

"FLAT  IRON  (OLD  0NE)/2  FLAT  IRONS  EACH  5  LB/2  FLAT  IRONS  EACH  6  LB/ 
2  FLAT  IRONS  EACH  8  LB."  MMNHP  has  three  8-pound  irons:  NPS  #1835, 
NPS  #1836,  and  NPS  #2734.  NPS  #1834  is  a  5-pound  iron.  Al- 
though not  listed,  NPS  #1837  is  a  flat-iron  holder. 


11.  Sears,  Roebuck  Catalogue  (New  York:  Bounty  Books,  1969;  rpt 
1902):  576. 

12.  Ibid.,  p.  597. 


94 


KITCHEN 

"NEW  BROOM."  Not  located. 

"COAL  SCUTTLE,"  NPS  #2542. 

"OLD  BROOM."  Possible  NPS  #10372. 

"SMALL  SHOVEL  FOR  RANGE/1  SHAKER  TO  STOVE."  NPS  #9446  is  a  single 
catalog  number  assigned  to  two  coal  shovels.  The  smaller 
one  might  be  the  one  listed  in  the  inventory.  The  coal  range 
is  not  listed  in  the  inventory,  possibly  an  oversight.  The 
stove  shaker  is  missing. 

"DUST  PAN."  Missing.  Sears  1902  catalog,  p.  591,  illustrates  three 
models. 

"WHISK  BROOM'V'SOFT  FLOOR  BRUSH."  NPS  #8188  might  be  the  floor 
brush.  The  whisk  broom  is  missing. 

"BEAN  POT."  Possibly  NPS  #8156,  but  no  lid  is  listed.  Sears  1902 
catalog  illustrates  a  lidded  bean  pot  of  a  different  form. 
The  capacity  is  from  one  to  eight  quarts. 

"BOOK  SHELF,"  MML  #65  &  #66.  "Extras"  are  a  wooden  shelf  with  bronze 
brackets  and  a  back  piece.  If  this  is  the  same  bookshelf,  it 
is  not  in  the  kitchen  today.  Possibly  it  is  NPS  #2574. 


95 


KITCHEN 

"WASH  BOARD,"  NPS  #2710.  This  board  is  stamped  "Manuf.  E.  Murdock 

Co.,  Winchendon,  Mass."  A  scene  depicting  pilgrims  is 

painted  on  the  reverse. 

"FLOOR  MOP,"  NPS  #9449. 

"DOOR  MAT."  Presumably,  this  was  kept  inside  the  kitchen  door.  It 
is  missing. 

"CARPET  SWEEPER."  Missing. 

"HAMMOCK  &  CUSHION  IN  OUTSIDE  CLOSET."  If  outside  closet  means  the 
pantry,  then  perhaps  the  Lothrops  stored  some  outdoor  furni- 
ture in  the  kitchen  during  the  winter.  The  objects  are  now 
missing. 

"IRONING  TABLE."  This  is  somewhat  of  a  mystery,  together  with  two 
tables  listed  earlier  and  an  ironing  board  listed  later. 

"BREAD  BOARD,"  NPS  #9448  is  a  possibility  for  this  item. 

"BLACK  TIN  TRAY."  There  are  several  possible  candidates  for  this 
item  at  the  park:  NPS  #2200;  MML  notes  #59.  This  tray  be- 
longed to  HML  before  1900.  NPS  #2199. 


96 


KITCHEN 

"LARGE  JAPANESE  TRAY."  This  is  perhaps  NPS  #1731,  which  MML  kept 

13 
in  the  dining  room  on  the  sideboard.  HML  owned  this  object. 

"5  DISH  TOWELS/2  DISH  TOWELS."  Possibly  five  of  one  material  or 
design,  and  two  of  another. 

"PLAID  RED  &  WHITE  TABLE  CLOTH."  Miss  Lothrop's  inventory  contains 
an  entry  for  "red  plaid  table  covers."  These  were  in  common 
use  at  the  time. 

"IRONING  H0LDER"/"IR0NING  BOARD."  The  holder  might  be  NPS  #1837,  a 
slate  and  metal  holder  for  an  8-pound  iron.  An  ironing  hold- 
er appears  nowhere  in  the  Sears  1902  or  Ward  1922  catalogs. 
NPS  #8515  is  an  ironing  board  that  might  be  the  one  listed  in 
the  inventory. 

"2  WHITE  HANDLED  KNIVES"/"!  OLD  SILVER  PLATED  KNIFE"/"2  OLD  SILVER 
PLATED  KNIVES"/"2  VEGETABLE  KNIVES."  These  might  be  the  following: 

NPS  #2399  (white  handled);  NPS  #8007,  NPS  #8008,  NPS  #8009, 

NPS  #8010,  NPS  #8011  (silver  plated). 

"1  ROLLER  TOWEL,"  NPS  #8357.  The  roller  is  missing. 


13.  MML  notes,  "Extras  6a." 


97 


KITCHEN 

"2  RED  &  WHITE  TOWELS   FOR  CHINA."     Originals  missing.     MMNHP  uses 
red  &  white  checked,  modern  towels  that  are  appropriate. 

"1    CAKE  KNIFE,"  NPS  #8006. 

"2  BREAD  KNIVES,"  NPS  #1805  and  NPS  #8014. 

"2  LARGE  COMMON  SPOONS."     Possibly  NPS   #8045--serving  spoon  marked 
"Patent  1880  Gorham,"  and  an  anchor.     NPS  #2580. 

"3  SMALLER  COMMON  SPOONS."     Possibly  NPS  #2183,  silver-plated, 
marked  "Patent  1880  Gorham,"  and  an  anchor;  NPS  #2184, 
silver-plated,  marked  "Patent  97,  1835  R.  Wallace  Co."     Ac- 
cording to  the  Kovels,  this  mark  dates  to  c.   1900  (A  Direc- 

14 
tory  of  American  Silver  Pewter,  and  Silver  Plate) .         NPS 

#8048--marked  "silver  plate"  on  back  handle. 

"7  COMMON  TEA  SPOONS."     Possibly  NPS  #8049,  marked   "WMA  Rogers  A  1 
(R)"  on  back  of  handle.     NPS  #8050,  marked   "WR".     NPS  #8047, 
marked  "+  holmes  &  edwards   (5)"  on  back  of  handle.     NPS 
#8051,   "WR"  on  back  of  handle.     NPS  #10361,   "pat:   04,   E. 
Holmes   &  Edwards   HE,   silver  inlaid." 

"1    CORKSCREW."     Missing;   "2  EGG  BEATERS."     Missing.      Four  types  of 


14.      Information  taken  from  NPS  catalog  entry, 


98 


KITCHEN 

corkscrews  are  illustrated  in  Sears,  1902,  p.  574.  Three 
types  of  egg  beaters,  "spoon,"  "surprise,"  and  "clover"  are 
illustrated  in  Sears,  1902,  p.  593. 

"1  DISH  MOP."  Missing.  Dish  mops  are  illustrated  in  Sears,  1902, 
p.  572. 

"2  SINK  SCRAPERS."  Missing. 

"1  SINK  COVER  RECEPTACLE."  Missing. 

"1  PANCAKE  TURNER."  Missing. 

"1  MILK  PAN." 

"1   LARGE  ENAMEL  BOWL."     Stoneware  milk  pans   looked  much  like  bowls. 
They  were  used  for  cooking  milk  or  cereal    (see  Sears,  1902, 
p.   798).     NPS  #9450  is  a  large  enamel    bowl. 

"1    DISH  STRAINER,"   NPS  #2715. 

"1   TIN  DISH  PAN,"  Missing/"1   PAPER  DISH  PAN 71    DITTO    [marks   spelled 
out].     NPS  #2739  labeled  "United  Indurated  Fibre  Co.,   "Fibrotta"/ 
Lockport  NY/U.S. A. /Warranted/Copyright  1889".     According  to 
another  label,   Fibrotta  was  patented  February  6,  1883.     The 
paper  dish  pans  are  missing  (probably  worn  out). 


99 


KITCHEN 

"1    LARGE  BLUE  PLATE,"   NPS   #8130.      "Engraved/for/W.    Ridgway  &  Co./ 
1832";  NPS  #8166  "Semi/china  engraved/ for/W.   Ridgway  12" 
on  bottom.     Blue  and  white  transfer-printed  English  soft- 
paste  porcelain.     Possibly  one  of  these  plates   is  the  ref- 
erent. 

"1   PRESERVE  DISH."     This   is  an  imprecise  description.     Neither 
early  Sears  nor  Montgomery  Ward  catalogs  list  preserve 
dishes  as  a  generic  term.     The  Lothrops  probably  used  a 
specific  dish  for  serving  preserves,  hence  the  name. 

"1   TIN  SALT  SHAKER"/"2  TIN  PEPPER  SHAKERS,"   NPS   #2598,   NPS  #2425 
are  glass  condiment  shakers  with  tin  tops.     Possibly  these 
are  the  same  items. 

"2  SMALL  BREAD  &  BUTTER  PLATES"/"2  SMALL  OATMEAL   DISHES"/6  BOWLS 
GRADED  SIZES--0NE  OF  THEM  BLUE,"   NPS  #1643,  NPS  #1644--might  be 

the  bread  and  butter  plates.     These  are  European  porcelain, 
white  with  gilt  rims.     Montgomery  Ward  advertises  oatmeal 
dishes.     The  other  dishes  are  not  documentable. 

"1    LARGE  VEGETABLE  GRATER,"   NPS   #8238. 

"1   SMALL  TIN  JELLY  MOULD."     Missing. 

"1    FUNNEL,"   NPS   #9451. 


100 


KITCHEN 

"ROLLING  PIN."  Missing.  See  Sears,  1902,  p.  597. 

"FLOUR  SIFTER."  Missing.  See  Sears,  1902,  p.  590. 

"LARGE  PRESERVE  JAR."  NPS  #2618  is  a  stoneware  jar  with  "James 
Keiller  &  Son  Dundee  Marmalade"  stamped  on  it. 

"BREAD  MIXER."  Missing. 

"STONE  CROCK  FOR  SUGAR."  Possibly  NPS  #8156. 

"VERY  LARGE  STONE  CROCK."  Missing. 

"BREAD  BOX,"  NPS  #2406. 

"CAKE  BOX,"  NPS  #9450. 

"1  MEDIUM  CAKE  BOWL,"  NPS  #9450.  This  was  listed  on  MML  "Extra  #75" 
as  a  "19th  century  kitchen  piece." 

"4  SHIRRED  EGG  CUPS."  Missing. 

"NUTMEG  GRATER."  Possibly  NPS  #8179. 

"2  BLUE  VEGETABLE  DISHES,"  NPS  #8185,  NPS  #8186.  English  transfer- 
printed  blue  and  white  willowware. 

"5  GRADED  SIZE  VEGETABLE  DISHES  TO  COOK  IN."  Missing. 


101 


KITCHEN 

"1  TWO  QUART  FARINA  BOILER"/"l  LARGE  FARINA  BOILER"/"l  LARGE 

BROILER"/"!  SMALL  BROILER."  All  missing. 

"1  TOASTER."  The  park  has  three  toasting  racks  (NPS  #10369,  NPS  # 
10370,  NPS  #10371)  for  toasting  bread  over  a  coal  or  wood- 
stove.  Perhaps  this  is  what  is  meant  by  "toaster"  in  the 
inventory. 

"1  MEDIUM  PRESERVING  &  BOILING  KETTLE  WITH  COVER,"  NPS  #1997. 

1  VERY  LARGE  PRESERVING  &  BOILING  KETTLE  WITH  COVER.  Missing. 

1  SMALLER  PRESERVING  &  BOILING  KETTLE  WITH  COVER.  Missing. 

1  SMALL  PRESERVING  &  BOILING  KETTLE  WITH  COVER.  Missing. 

"2  LARGE  SAUCEPANS."  Missing. 

"1  MEDIUM  SAUCEPAN."  Missing. 

"1  SMALLER  SAUCEPAN."  Missing. 

"1  VERY  SMALL  SAUCEPAN."  Missing. 

"PITCHERS:  1  LARGE  WHITE  PITCHER."  Possibly,  NPS  #2769,  an  iron- 
stone pitcher  marked,  "Royal  Ironstone  China/Alfred  Meaker 
England." 


102 


KITCHEN 

"2  MEDIUM  PITCHERS."  One  might  be  NPS  #8163,  an  ironstone  pitcher 
labeled  "Royal  Ironstone  China/Aired  Meaker,  Ltd. /England." 
The  other  is  missing. 

"2  SMALLER  PITCHERS."  Missing. 

"1  SMALL  PITCHER."  Missing. 

"1  COLANDER."  Missing.  See  Sears,  1902,  pp.  587,  589  for  compara- 
ble pieces . 

"1  LARGE  COLANDER."  Missing.  See  Sears,  1902,  pp.  587,  589  for 
comparable  pieces. 

"2  MEDIUM  STRAINERS."  Missing.  See  Sears,  1902,  pp.  587,  589  for 
comparable  pieces. 

"1  SMALL  STRAINER."  Missing.  See  Sears,  1902,  pp.  587,  589  for 
comparable  pieces . 

"1  COFFEE  POT,"  NPS  #9452. 

"1  TEA  POT."  NPS  #1642,  white  china  labeled  "Theodore  Parker  Tea 
Pot." 

"1  LARGE  PAN  FOR  GEMS." 


103 


KITCHEN 

"1  MEDIUM  PAN  FOR  GEMS." 

"1  SMALL  PAN  FOR  GEMS."  A  gem  is  a  muffin  made  of  coarse  flour. 
Sears  sold  several  types  of  muffin  pans  in  1902.  They  are 
called  "cakepans,"  "turk  head  pans,"  or  "muffin  pans," 
(pp.  585,  589).  The  Lothrop  pans  are  missing. 

"1  MEAT  CHOPPER."  NPS  #2407  is  a  meat  grinder  labeled,  "Sargent 
&  Co.,"  "Patented  Apr.  25-99  Oct.  6  1906."  The  funnel-top 
opening  is  labeled  "Gen  Food  Chopper  22,"  "Pat.  Mar.  8-92." 

"1  POTATO  RICER."  Missing. 

"1  POTATO  MASHER,"  NPS  #2403. 

"2  BROWN  CASSEROLE  DISHES."  Missing. 

"TIN  DIPPER."  Missing. 

"3  BLUE  CUPS  &  SAUCERS"/"2  WHITE  CUPS  &  SAUCERS."     The  Lothrops 

kept  their  good  dinnerware  in  the  dining  room.     The  kitchen- 
ware  was  probably  for  the  servants'    use.     NPS  #8128,  NPS 
#8122,  NPS  #8125  are  blue  and  white  cups,  an  English,   trans- 
fer-printed version  of  Chinese  export  Canton  ware;  NPS  #1649, 
NPS  #1651   are  white  cups.     NPS   #8191,   NPS   #8192,   NPS   #8195 
are  matching  blue  and  white  saucers,  marked   "engraved,   1832 


104 


KITCHEN 

for  W.  Ridgway,  [bow  and  arrow],  Ridgway  England."  NPS 
#1658,  NPS  #1652,  and  NPS  #1653  are  white  saucers,  unmarked 
These  are  part  of  a  set.  Purchased  from  Miss  Houghton, 
Concord,  and  reported  to  have  belonged  to  either  the  Adams 
or  Hoar  famil ies . 

"1  NEW  TEA  KETTLE"/"!  OLD  TEA  KETTLE."  Possibly  NPS  #9458,  a 

nickel-plated  kettle  with  a  turned  wooden  handle,  painted 
black.  "Rome"  is  stamped  on  the  fillings  at  each  end  of 
the  handle.  NPS  #9453  is  a  chromium-plated  kettle,  marked 
"Solid/Copper/Chromium/Plated/Made  in  USA." 

"1  LEMON  SQUEEZER."  Missing. 

"1  LARGE  FRYER."  NPS  #9457  is  a  9h"  tin  plated  frying  pan.  The 
handle  is  marked  "Kresge"  and  a  tentative  date  of  1930  is 
assigned  to  it. 

"1  SMALLER  FRYER."  NPS  #1996  is  a  black,  cast-iron  frying  pan  or 
skillet  that  was  owned  by  Harriett  Lothrop. 

"1  OBLONG  FRYER."  Missing. 

"1  VERY  LARGE  ROASTING  PAN"/"1  MEDIUM  ROASTING  PAN."  Missing. 
Sears,  1902,  p.  583,  illustrates  three  types  of  covered 
roasting  pans. 


105 


KITCHEN 

"1  NEW  SAUCEPAN"/"1  NEW  SAUCEPAN."  Missing. 

"2  NEW  CAKE  TINS."  Missing. 

"BUTTER  CROCK."  Missing. 

"1  WHITE  TRAY."  Missing. 

"2  BLUE  MEDIUM  SAUCERS."  Possibly  NPS  #8195;  NPS  #8139  (discussed 
above) . 

"1  LARGE  BLUE  PLATTER."  Missing. 

"2  SMALL  WHITE  PLATTERS."  Possibly  NPS  #2456  and  NPS  #2465. 

"4  BREAD  PANS."  Missing. 

"2  SQUARE  CAKEPANS."  NPS  #8183  might  be  one. 

"1  ANGEL  CAKE  PAN."  Missing. 

"2  ROUND  CAKE  PANS."  Missing. 

"2  LARGE  BROWN  PIE  PLATES."  Missing. 

"3  SMALL  PIE  PLATES."  Missing. 

"2  LARGE  CUSTARD  CUPS."  Missing. 

"2  MEDIUM  CUSTARD  CUPS."  Missing. 


106 


KITCHEN 

"1  SMALLER  CUSTARD  CUP."  Missing. 

"6  SMALL  CUSTARD  CUPS."  Missing. 

"1  SUGAR  BOWL."  Possibly  NPS  #1655,  Continental  or  English  hard 
paste  porcelain. 

"TEA  CADDY  (CROCKERY)."  NPS  #1667  could  be  a  tea  caddy,  although 
cataloger,  Cordelia  Snow,  calls  it  a  sugar  bowl.  It  is 
creamware,  probably  late  nineteenth  century,  English. 

"KNIFE  BASKET  (STRAW)."  NPS  #2140  is  a  shallow  (IV  d.)  basket 
made  of  woven  cane.  The  basket  is  12V  long  and  could  ac- 
commodate knives. 

"3  ZINC  ASH  BARRELS."  Missing.  These  were  essential  to  a  coal 
stove. 

"GARBAGE  RECEPTACLE,  OUTSIDE  BY  COAL-BIN."  Missing. 

Other  items  now  in  the  Wayside  kitchen  that  are  not  listed  in  the 
inventory,  but  that  are  appropriate  to  the  1883-1924  period  follow: 
NPS  #1739  Blanc-Mange  mold  supposedly  belonging  to  Mrs.  Hawthorne. 
In  a  letter  from  Sophia  Hawthorne  to  Una  Hawthorne,  December  11, 
1862,  she  states,  "I  carried  to  Mrs.  Alcott  early  this  morning  some 
maize  blanc  mange  which  Ann  made  for  papa,  and  turned  out  of  the 


107 


KITCHEN 

15 
sheaf  mould  very   nicely."    NPS  #1739  has  a  wheat  sheaf 

embossed  on  the  bottom.  I  can  find  no  documentation  firm- 
ly linking  the  Hawthorne  reference  to  this  mold.  The  wheat 
sheaf  pattern  is  quite  common. 

CLOTHES  WRINGER,  NPS  #2746.  Horseshoe  brand,  patented  1888. 

CLOTHES  BOILER  OR  WASH  TUB,  NPS  #2743. 

KEROSENE  CAN,  NPS  #2650.  Probably  predates  1906  when  the  Wayside 
was  electrified. 

SIGN,  NPS  #10345.  Labeled  "Ice"  on  one  side,  and  "Fuel  oil"  on  the 
other. 

"THE  WAYSIDE  COOKBOOK,"  NPS  #8920.  1886.  Used  to  note  recipes. 

POPCORN  POPPERS,  NPS  #10352,  NPS  #10353.  Metal  baskets  on  long 
handles. 

RUG  BEATER,  NPS  #1995. 


15.  Julian  Hawthorne,  Hawthorne  and  His  Wife,  p.  326 


108 


LOWER  FRONT  HALL 

Furniture 

WARDROBE,  NPS  #8579;  MML  #16.  One  of  a  group  of  furnishings  brought 
to  the  Wayside  from  D.  Lothrop's  Boston  office.  In  one  in- 
terview, MML  stated  this  piece  was  brought  to  the  Wayside 
after  her  father's  death;  in  another,  she  stated  that  her 

parents  brought  the  piece  to  the  Wayside  when  they  moved 

16 
there.  The  wardrobe  always  stood  in  the  same  place.   Also 

cited  in  1914-15  inventories  as  "Large  Cabinet"  Walnut.  Two 
sections  for  hanging  clothes,  center  section  with  shelves. 
Dates  to  1870s.  See  Illustration  10  "Lower  Front  Hall"  look- 
ing south. 

TABLE,  NPS  #2543.  Walnut  with  white  marble  top.  Miss  Lothrop  notes 
on  her  inventory  as  Table  #21.  She  provides  no  documentation 
for  it. 


16.  Ronsheim,  "Evidence  of  Historic  Furnishings,  Draft,"  p.  58, 
park  files.  On  September  11,  1981,  I  interviewed  Mr.  Ronsheim  in 
his  Indianapolis  home.  We  discussed  his  research  and  his  personal 
acquaintance  with  MML  when  he  worked  as  an  Historian  at  MMNHP.  Mr 
Ronsheim  generously  made  his  notes  and  drafts  available  to  me  for 
this  project  and  I  express  my  gratitude  for  this.  His  historical 
research  is  first-rate.  My  own  research  corroborates  his  findings 
in  many  cases.  Ronsheim's  draft  focused  on  the  1914-1915  invento- 
ries. Because  no  information  exists  about  1924,  the  year  of  HML's 
death,  I  have  combined  references  to  the  various  Lothrop  occupan- 
cies. MMNHP  card  files,  "Interior  Rooms"  from  Interview  with  MML, 
Winter,  1965-66,  typescript,  p.  36;  MML  notes,  "LFH  #16." 


109 


LOWER  FRONT  HALL 

CHAIR,  NPS  #2037;  MML  "Chair"  #11.  Brought  from  Italy  by  HML  in 
1906  or  1911.  Referred  to  as  "Fra  Savanarola"  because  of 
the  image  of  the  Renaissance  cleric  on  the  back.  MML  kept 
this  in  the  lower  front  hall.  It  was  listed  in  the  Piazza 
room  in  1914  and  in  the  Library  in  1915. 

CLOTHES  POLE  (LIGHT  WOOD).  Listed  on  the  1915  inventory.  There 
is  no  other  reference  to  the  object. 

Textiles 

BANNER,  NPS  #2552;  MML  "Picture"  #70.  Over  doorway  to  Sitting 
Room.  Inscribed,  "Now  fayre  betyde  whoe  here  aby  de  and 
happie  may  theye  be  and  good  befall  whoe  in  this  halle 
render  fayre  courtesie."  MML  notes  that  HML  purchased  this 
in  England,  pre-1911 . 

Curtains 

In  an  interview  of  MML  by  Orville  Carroll,  July  28,  1966,  Miss 
Lothrop  states  that  the  side  lights  at  the  front  door  always  had 
curtains  over  them.  She  made  one  set  of  curtains,  but  these  were 
not  the  earliest  set.  Her  set  is  in  storage  at  MMNHP  and  a  repro- 
duction set  is  on  display.  MML  gave  conflicting  information  about 

the  curtains  to  Ronsheim.  She  did  not  believe  the  curtains  were 

17 
always  there. 


17.  Ronsheim,  "Historic  Furnishings,"  p.  61 


110 


LOWER  FRONT  HALL 

"LARGE  GREEN  RUG."  This  was  put  down  in  1899  in  both  the  upper  and 

18 
lower  front  hall  and  on  the  stairs  between.    MMNHP 's  docu- 
ment is  a  portion  that  remained  in  the  upper  hall. 

19 
FRONT  DOOR  MAT.  MML  remembers  a  fiber  mat  outside  the  front  door. 

It  is  listed  on  the  inventories. 

Lighting  Devices 

"2  ELECTRIC  FIXTURES  WITH  PENDENTS/2  GLASS  SHADES  FOR  SAME."  These 

are  recorded  on  the  inventories.  The  items  are  now  in  the 

lower  front  hall  (see  Illustration  10).  In  the  July  28,  1966 

20 
interview,  MML  stated  that  the  fixtures  had  never  been  moved. 

Prints 

"RESOLUTION  ADOPTED  BY  TENTH  CONTINENTAL  CONGRESS  OF  DAR,"  NPS  #2206. 

Expression  of  thanks  to  HML  for  her  work  in  the  CAR.  Framed 

in  plain  oak  frame,  3"  thick. 

"FOUR  PHOTOGRAPHS  IN  ONE  FRAME,"  NPS  #2294-2297.  Listed  on  1915  in- 
ventory. Photos  of  a  tapestry,  labeled:  "Roma-Stove  di  Cef- 


18.  HML  to  MML,  MMNHP  MS  #8990507;  Ronsheim,  "Historic  Furnishings," 
pp.  59-60. 

19.  Ronsheim,  "Historic  Furnishings,"  p.  60. 

20.  MMNHP  files. 


Ill 


LOWER  FRONT  HALL 

alo  et  Proksi  Arazzo  Borgia,  Reprodizione  intereletta-- 
Anderson-Roma."     Photos  are  black  and  white.     MML  stated 

that  HML  bought  these  in  Europe  and  had  them  framed  in 

21 
Boston.         The  frame  is  labeled  "Bigelow  &  Jordan,   import- 
ers,  publishers,  manufacturers,"  Brownfield  St.  641-643 
Atlantic  Ave.,  Boston,  Mass.   U.S.A.   No.   88030B."     A  bill 
survives  from  Bigelow  &  Jordan,  dated  March  19,  1900,   for 

framing  3  photographs  for  $18.     Possibly,  this  refers   to 

22 
the  same  item,  although  the  number  of  photos  differs. 


Other 

FIRE  EXTINGUISHER.  An  extinguisher  is  listed  on  the  1915  inven- 

23 
tory.  MML  confirmed  this  with  Ronsheim. 


21.  MMNHP,  storage,  Box  marked  "Lothrops  'The  Wayside  Details 
about  Rooms,  also  furniture,  etc.'" 

22.  MMNHP  files. 

23.  Ronsheim,  "Historic  Furnishings,"  p.  59. 


112 


MRS.   HAWTHORNE'S   PARLOR 

Textiles 

24 
RUG.     Installed  by  HML,   c.   1908. 

25 
ROLLER  SHADES.     Always  used  by  HML,   to  MML's  memory. 

PINK  CURTAINS,   NPS  #10394,   NPS  #10395,   NPS   #10396.      Inside  the 

doors  of  DL's  bookcases   "held  tight   [i.e.   shirred]   at  top 

26 
and  bottom." 

CURTAINS,  NPS  #10389,  NPS  #10390,  NPS  #10393.  White  Swiss  net 
curtains.  MML  gave  these  to  the  Wayside  in  1965.  Their 
age  and  the  precedent  for  their  use  is  unknown. 

CURTAINS,  NPS  #10397,  NPS  #10398,  NPS  #10399.  White  net  curtains 
with  floral  patterns.  Gift  of  MML;  age  and  precedent  un- 
certain. Net  and  lace  curtains  are  listed  on  the  1914  in- 
ventory. 

Lighting  Devices 

LANTERN.  Suspended  from  ceiling.  MML  states  that  all  fixtures 


24.  Interview,  Carroll/MML,  Draft  transcription,  n.p.,  n.d., 
MMNHP  files. 

25.  Ibid. 

26.  Interview,  MML,   March  27,   1967,   "Interior  Rooms,"  MMNHP 
f i 1 es  . 


113 


MRS.  HAWTHORNE'S  PARLOR 

were  designed  "by  Bigelow  and  Kannard  Co.  of  Boston  on 

27 
Washington  Street." 


ASTRAL  LAMP,  NPS  #1784;  MML  "Lamp"  #1 .  HML  wired  this  for  elec- 
tricity. The  glass  shade  was  broken  when  MML  gave  it  to 
the  park. 

Prints,  Paintings 

"ENTRY  INTO  JERUSALEM,"  NPS  #2042.  English,  one  of  a  series  of 

scenes  from  The  Stations  of  the  Cross.  Steel  engraving 

from  original  bas  relief  by  John  Hancock  Bates,  Patent  by 

L.  &  J.  T.  Dowling.  Ebony  and  gilt  frome.  MML  believed 

28 
this  series  belonged  to  DL  before  he  married  HML.    (They 

were  always  listed  on  inventories  of  this  room.) 

"CHRIST  LED  TO  CRUCIFIXION,"  NPS  #2640.  English,  one  of  a  series 
of  scenes  from  The  Stations  of  the  Cross  (see  #2042  above). 

"MADONNA  AND  FAMILY,"  NPS  #2043.  Chromo  lithograph  of  a  painting 
by  Erich  Orrens .  MML  (Pictures  #8),  believed  this  painting 


27.  Carroll/MML  interview,  Draft  transcription,  n.p.,  n.d.,  MMNHP 
files. 

28.  Ronsheim,  "Historic  Furnishings,"  p.  78. 


114 


MRS.  HAWTHORNE'S  PARLOR 

belonged  to  DL  before  his  marriage  to  HML.  This  is  visible 
over  the  mantel  in  the  earliest  photograph  of  this  room  (Il- 
lustration 12)  which  was  probably  taken  between  1888  and 
1893.  The  painting  remains  over  the  mantel .  MML  noted  that 
a  Biographical  Dictionary  of  Painters  and  Engravers  (no  pub- 
lication information,  p.  334)  dates  Orrens  to  1821-1877, 

dating  the  print  to  approximately  1840-77.  Chromol ithography 

29 
was  introduced  around  1840. 

PHOTOGRAPH,  NPS  #2784.  Portrait,  inscribed,  "To  Mrs.  Lothrop  with 
regards  of  S.W.  McCall,  Winchester,  May  3-16."  McCall  was  a 
state  governor. 

PHOTOGRAPH,  NPS  #2785.  Portrait,  autographed,  "To  Mrs.  Lothrop/With 
kind  regards,  Edmund  Stedman."  Framed  by  Jordan  Marsh  Co. 

This  appears  in  post-1922  photographs  of  the  room.  Stedman 

30 
was  "a  member  of  the  New  York  literary  circle."    He  was  in- 
vited to  the  Wayside  on  the  occasion  of  Hawthorne's  centenary, 
but  was  unable  to  attend. 


29.  Peter  C.  Marzio,  The  Democratic  Art:  Pictures  for  a  Nineteenth- 
Century  America.,  Chromol ithography,  1840-1900  (Boston:  David  R.  Jod i ne 
in  association  with  the  Amon  Carter  Museum  of  Western  Art,  Fort  Worth, 
1979.) 

30.  Ronsheim,  "Historic  Furnishings,"  Draft,  p.  79,  quoting  the 
Dictionary  of  American  Biography. 


115 


MRS.  HAWTHORNE'S  PARLOR 

PHOTOGRAPH,  NPS  #2272.  Portrait,  autographed,  "Geo.  S.  Boutwell," 
and  dated  "October  26,  1902."  Boutwell  was  a  politician. 

PHOTOGRAPH,  NPS  #2348.  Portrait,  inscribed,  "Edward  E.  Hale  Feb.  3, 

1903."  A  motto,  written  by  Hale,  is  also  framed,  "Look  up 

and  not  down/look  forward  and  not  back/look  out  and  not  in/ 

lend  a  hand."  Hale  was  a  good  friend  of  DL.  The  photo  was 

31 
on  the  north  wall  in  the  northwest  corner  in  1922. 

PHOTOGRAPH,  NPS  #2275.  Portrait,  inscribed,  "Julia  Ward  Howe,  Sept. 
2nd,  1903."  A  manuscript  of  a  verse  from  the  "Battle  Hymn  of 
the  Republic"  in  Howe's  handwriting  (NPS  #2276)  is  in  the  same 
frame.  HML  and  Mrs.  Howe  were  friends. 

Sculpture 

BUST  OF  DANIEL  L0THR0P,  NPS  #1984;  MML  "Picture"  #71.  Bronze,  by  S. 

Kitson,  1892.  This  was  the  central  piece  in  HML's  memorial 

room  to  her  husband.  NPS  #2498  is  an  Edward  Hale  holography, 

"Daniel  Lothrop  was  founder  of  House  of  D.  Lothrop  Co.  .  .  . 

32 
An  American  through  and  through  .  .  .  . " 


31  .  Ibid.,  p.  80 


32.  See  MMNHP,  MS  8940102  where  HML  states  that  delays  in  sending 
items  from  the  publishing  company  caused  the  dedication  of  the  room 
to  be  postponed. 


116 


MRS.   HAWTHORNE'S   PARLOR 

STATUE,   NPS  #1756.     Parian  statue  of  nude  female.     HML   purchased 
it  in  1906  or  1911   on  a  trip  to   Italy.     MML  noted  that  the 
statue  (11    3/4"   h.)  sat  on  the  mantel    in  this  room.     MML's 
notes   "Extra"   #62. 

Metals 

PAIR  OF  VASES,   NPS  #1724,  NPS  #1725.     Bronze,   Chinese,   possibly 

from  HML's   family.     Mentioned   in  1915  inventory  of  parlor. 

They  are  visible  in  the  1890s   photo,    Illustration  12.     MML 

"Vases  #3  and  #4." 

Ceramics 

VASE,   NPS   #2600.     Presently   in  the   room.     No  documentation. 

Clocks 

BAULLIOR  CLOCK,   NPS  #1581;  MML   "Clock  #1."     This   French  clock  was 

from  HML's   family,   probably  the  Mul fords.     MML  recalls   that 

it  always  stood  on  the  mantel. 

Books 

The  bookcases  are  full   of  DL  and  HML's  books,   including  their  own 

publ ications . 

Furniture 

STANDARD,  NPS  #1985.  A  square,  mahogany  pedestal  supporting  a  bust 
of  Daniel  Lothrop.  (See  Illustration  1.) 


117 


MRS.   HAWTHORNE'S  PARLOR 

STANDARD,   NPS   #1985.     A  square,  mahogany  pedestal    used  to  support 
a  bust  of  Daniel   Lothrop.      (See  Illustration  13.) 

BOOKCASES,   NPS  #2636,   NPS  #2637,   NPS  #2638.     Three  large  bookcases 

originally  used  at  the  Lothrop  Co.   in  Boston   (visible  in 

33 
Illustrations  12  and  13).         They  were  brought  to  Concord 

after  DL's  death  and  subsequent  sale  of  the  publishing  com- 
pany.    MML's  notes  mention  a  fourth  bookcase  in  the  barn 
loft.     This   is  probably  NPS   #8579,   now  in  the  lower  front 
hall. 

ARMCHAIR,   NPS  #2082.     This  is  part  of  a  parlor  suite  that  belonged 

to  DL  during  his  first  marriaqe.     MML  recalled  that  it  was 

34 
"always"   in  this  room.         The  back  and  arms  are  upholstered 

in  green  velvet  (see  Illustrations  12  and  13). 


LADY'S  CHAIR,  NPS  #2059         All   part  of  parlor  suite  described  under 

SIDE  CHAIR,   NPS   #2060 

SIDE  CHAIR,   NPS  #2061  NPS  #2082  above.     Miss  Lothrop  recalled  a 

SIDE  CHAIR,   NPS   #2062 

SIDE  CHAIR,   NPS  #2063  sofa  as   part  of  the  suite,  but  it  is   lost 


33.  MML  "Bookcases  #3,"  MMNHP  files 

34.  MML   "Chairs   #3,"  MMNHP  files. 


118 


MRS.   HAWTHORNE'S  PARLOR 

CHAIR,   NPS  #2021.     Library  chair  with  red  leather  upholstery  on  seat 
and  back.     MML's  reference:     "All   my  life  I   have  been  told 
that  it  had  been  (Mr.   Nathaniel)  Hawthorne's  and  that  Daniel 
Lothrop  and  Harriet  Lothrop  had  bought  it  from  Mrs.   Rose  Haw- 
thorne Lathrop  when  they  bought  the  house  in  1883.     In  a  di- 
ary of  Mrs.  Hawthorne's  written  at  the  Wayside,  September  1852 
(now  at  the  Pierpont  Morgan  Library,  New  York  City)   she  men- 
tions his    'red  chair'."     Margaret  M.   Lothrop's  catalog  refer- 
ence "Chairs  #1."     This  chair  certainly  displays  the  "Moorish" 
style  popular  in  the  mid-nineteenth  century;  MML's  provenance 
is  guite  possibly  correct. 

PEDESTAL,  NPS  #2205.     Oak  pedestal    for  a  lamp.     See  its   present  use 
as  a  support  for  an  astral    lamp  in  Illustration  13. 

TABLE,   NPS   #2047.     A  neo-Grec,  marble  top  library  table  with  centrally- 
connected  stretchers.     MML  believes  this  belonged  to  DL  during 

35 
his  first  marriage. 

CHAIR,   NPS  #2020;  MML  #22.     This   is  a  Stone  family  piece.     MML  states 
that  the  needlepoint  back  and  seat  were  worked  by  HML  when  she 
was  eighteen  years  old  and  recovering  from  typhoid  fever.     This 
means  the  chair  existed  as  early  as  1862.     The  chair  appears  to 
be  an  early  example  of  William  and  Mary  revival. 


35.     MML  "Tables  #4,"  MMNHP  files. 

119 


OLD  ROOM 

Ceramics  &  Glass 

PLATE,  NPS  #1611;  MML  China  #40.  Chinese  export  porcelain,  Canton. 
From  HML's  family,  MML  recalls  her  mother  used  blue  and  white 
doilies  with  this  china.  MML  took  the  "qood  pieces  of  the 
set  to  California  and  sold  it  there." 

CUP,  NPS  #1665.  Chinese  export  porcelain,  probably  Canton. 

SAUCERS,  DISH,  NPS  #2780,  NPS  #2781,  NPS  #2782.  English  transfer- 
printed  soft  paste  porcelain.  Marked  "Oriental,"  "Ridqways," 
"England,"  impressed  numbers  6,  04;  7,  97;  1,  08.  NPS  #2782 
is  stamped  "61"  in  green,  suggesting  a  possible  date  for  this 
pattern. 

CHINESE  EXPORT  PORCELAIN,  CANTON,  NPS  #s  8123,  8124,  8126,  8127, 

8129,  8131,  8132,  8134,  8135,  8136,  8139,  8140,  8190,  8192, 
8196,  8197,  8198,  8199,  8186,  8200  through  8213,  8235.  Plates, 
cups,  saucers,  and  bowls. 

PITCHER,  NPS  #8132.  Copper  lustre  pitcher,  with  dancing  figures, 

known  as  "polka  jug."  Cataloger  Cordelia  Snow  noted  that  it 
was  probably  made  after  1830  in  an  old  mold.  Snow  cited  a 
comparable  piece  in  N.  Hudson  Moore,  The  Collector's  Manual 
(Stokes  Press  Co.,  1906:  pp.  191-192,  plate  218). 


120 


OLD  ROOM 

PLATE,  NPS  #1637.  "Gaudy  Dutch"  plate,  soft  paste  porcelain.  Pur- 
chased by  HML  in  England  c.  1911.  Marked  "Wood"  (Enoch  Wood 
and  Sons,  Platters,  Burslem,  England,  Staffordshire,  1800- 
1814,  with  Hill  works  in  Burslem). 

VASE,  NPS  #2453.  Glass. 

INKSTAND,  NPS  #1670.  White  porcelain  with  gold  leaf  in  the  shape 

of  a  flower  basket.  Metal  ink  well  and  sander,  owned  by  HML. 

SLEEPING  CHILD,  NPS  #1757.  Parian  figure.  No  documentation. 

Furniture 

SIDE  CHAIR,   NPS  #2010;  MML   "Chairs"   #18.     Ladder-back,   rush  seat. 

Purchased  by  HML.     Traditionally  a  Manning  chair  (Hawthorne 

family) . 

"NORWEGIAN  CABINET."  Brought  back  from  Norway  by  HML.  MML  gave  it 
to  her  cousin,  Mr.  Griffin  (Illustration  14). 

CHAIR,  NPS  #2048;  MML  "Chairs  #14"  ROCKER.  A  painted  pine  rocker 
with  stenciling  on  the  crest  rail.  MML  believed  it  was  in 
the  Wayside  "for  many  years."  She  called  it  a  "Boston  Rock- 
er," a  contemporary  term  for  a  Windsor  type  rocker  with  wide, 
painted  crest  rail  and  rolled  seat.  A  similar  Boston  rocker 
is  pictured  in  the  Brooklyn  Chair  Co.  catalog  (Brooklyn,  1887) 


121 


OLD  ROOM 

No.  251,  p.  42,  facsimile,  A  Victorian  Chair  for  All  Seasons 
(Watkins  Glen,  NY:  American  Life  Foundation  Library  of  Vic- 
torian Culture,  1978). 

PIANO  STOOL.  Listed  in  1915  inventory.  This  matched  a  Miller  piano 
which  MML  sold  after  1928.  The  original  stool  (and  piano) 
are  visible  in  Illustration  15,  a  view  of  the  sitting  room 
dated  1898. 

MUSIC  STAND.  The  1914  inventory  indicates  a  "mission"  music  stand, 
related  to  other  "mission"  pieces  which  MML  brought  from  Cal- 
ifornia. MML  lived  in  California  at  the  height  of  the  "mis- 
sion" craze  in  architecture  and  furniture.  She  purchased 
much  furniture  in  that  style,  later  disposing  of  it  because 
it  was  unsuitable  to  the  Wayside's  decor. 

TABLE,  NPS  #2038;  MML  "Tables  #16."  Oak  folding  table  with  inlaid 
inserts  for  checkerboard.  "Used  often  by  HL  when  she  played 
chess  with  me  when  I  was  a  girl." 

WINDSOR  CHAIR,  NPS  #2193;  MML  "Chairs  #31."  No  documentation. 

ARMCHAIR,  NPS  #2648;  MML  "Chairs  #36."  Labeled,  "Grand  Ledge  Chair 
Co. /Grand  Ledge,  Mich/no.  977."  Probably  pre-1924.  This  is 
a  late-nineteenth-century  Queen  Anne  revival  armchair  modi- 


122 


OLD  ROOM 

fied  by  reform-style  characteristics,  such  as  the  wide, 
squared-off  crest  rail   and  spindles   in  place  of  a  back 
splat. 

CHAIR,   NPS  #2120;  MML  "Chair  #16"  WINDSOR.     Purchased  by  HML  from 
Mrs.   Clark,  a  native  of  Concord  (see  Illustration  16,   1922). 

TABLE,  NPS  #2066.     A  drop-leaf  table.     There  is  a  drop-leaf  table 
in  the  1898  photo  of  this  room  (Illustration  17).     Possibly 
this   is  the  same  table. 

Lighting  Devices 

CANDLESTICKS,  NPS  #1773;  MML  "Candles  #13  &  #14"  SET.  Pewter,  be- 
lieved electrified  by  HML.  Used  in  niches  on  mantel  in  Old 
Room. 

CHAMBERSTICK,   NPS  #1765.     Probably  English,  c.   1885. 

CANDLESTICK,   NPS  #1774.     Wood  base.     Owned  by  HML. 

LAMP,   NPS  #1783.     Astral    lamp  with   brass  pedestal.     Belong  to  HML's 
family,   probably  c.   1850.     This  and  NPS  #1785  could  be  "2 
bronze  lamps  on  piano  listed  en  1914  inventory." 

LAMP,   NPS  #1785.     Astral    lamp  with   brass  pedestal. 


123 


OLD  ROOM 

LAMP,  NPS  #2064.  Marked  "Jones  Lour  &  Fall,  Boston."  Electrified 
oil  lamp.  This  is  seen  in  Illustration  17,  1898.  Probably 
"1  Bronze  lamp  with  glass  shade  on  bracket"  mentioned  in 
1914  inventory. 

Fireplace  Equipment 
FIREPLACE  SHOVEL,  NPS  #2576. 

WROUGHT  IRON  POKER,  NPS  #2575. 

ANDIRONS,  NPS  #8000,  NPS  #8001.  Seen  in  1898  and  1922  photographs. 

BELLOWS,  NPS  #1788.  Seen  in  1898  photo. 

TRAMMEL,  NPS  #2674.  Seen  in  1898  photo. 

SMALL  HOOK,  NPS  #10317.  Two  pot  hooks  are  seen  in  the  1898  photo. 

WOODEN  BOX,  NPS  #2030;  MML  "Fireplace  Equipment  #3."  Purchased  by 
HML  c.  1900  and  used  to  store  wood  by  the  fireplace.  Carved 
into  lid  is  this  motto,  "In  this  the  art  of  living  lies/To 
want  no  more  than  may  suffice." 

Metals 

FOOT  WARMER,  NPS  #1734.  No  documentation. 


124 


OLD  ROOM 

TEA  KETTLE,  NPS  #2125.  There  is  a  tea  kettle  hanging  from  the  tram- 
mel in  Illustration  17.  Perhaps  this  is  the  same  one.  Iron; 
marked  "N  Baldwin,"  "spout  cast  81." 

Pictures 

WATERCOLOR,  NPS  #2151;  MML  "Picture  #64."  "James  and  Roxanne  Adams.' 
MML  says,  "Roxanne  Hoar  Adams  was  born  at  the  Wayside.  James 
Adams  was  a  Concord  cabinetmaker."  Judging  from  the  composi- 
tion and  garment  and  furnishing  styles,  the  work  dates  to 
1820-40.  Attributed  to  Joseph  Davis.  This  is  on  the  mantel 
in  the  1898  photo. 

Musical  Instruments 

MML  sold  the  Miller  piano  listed  on  the  1915  inventory  and  pictured 

36 
in  the  1898  Sitting  Room  photo.  She  did  not  know  who  bought  it. 

1914  Inventory  Items 

"WHITE  FRAMED  PICTURES  OF  MR.  BULL  AND  HIS  COTTAGE."  1914  inventory, 
Presuming  these  were  separate  items,  one  is  possibly  MML  #131 
(location  unknown),  and  NPS  #2255,  an  etching  printed  to  com- 
memorate the  celebration  HHL  held  in  honor  of  Mr.  Bull. 


36.  Now,  NPS  #8676,  a  labeled  Chickering  piano,  is  in  the  room. 
This  is  not  original  to  the  house. 


125 


OLD  ROOM 

"PAIR  OF  BLUE  WOODEN  HOLLAND  SHOES  ON  SHELF."  1914  inventory. 

Missing. 

37 
"LARGE  FRESOLE  FAN."  1914  inventory.  Lost  in  California. 

"PROTECTOR  FOR  FIREPLACE."  1914  inventory.  Missing.  Neither 
the  1898  nor  the  1922  photos  show  fireplace  screens. 

"PICTURES  OVER  PIANO."  1914  inventory.  These  may  be  visible 

in  the  1898  photo.  By  1914,  the  printed  "Hawthorne  card- 
board," the  label  copy  visible  in  the  1898  photo,  was  in 
the  closet. 

Also  Visible  in  the  1898  Photo: 

BOX  CAMERA  IN  LEATHER  CASE  HANGING  ON  WALL. 

SLAT-BACK  "YORK"  CHAIR.  "Could  be  Mr.  Bull's  chair." 

LADDER-BACK  ROCKER.  (Appears  to  be  nineteenth  century.) 

A  PHOTO  OR  PRINT  of  Hawthorne  on  the  mantel  draped  with  what  ap- 
pears to  be  black  crepe. 

FRINGED  SHADES.  Had  many  shades  on  lamps. 


37.  Ronsheim,  "Historic  Furnishings,"  p.  55 


126 


OLD  ROOM 

"POSTER  UNDERNEATH  PICTURE,  looks  like  John  Hancock  calendar,  might 

38 
be  Old  State  House." 


PIAZZA  ROOM 
Floor  Coverings 

MML  recalls  in  an  interview  with  Orville  Carroll  a  "rug  or  something" 
on  the  floor.  Carroll  cited  a  photo  (now  lost)  showing  a  patterned 
rug.  In  another  reference,  "Extras,"  MML  recalled  that  HML  put  yel- 
low matting  in  this  room  in  1899. 

Prints,  Paintings 

"FIRST  LANDING  OF  COLUMBUS,  WATLINGS  ISLAND  (OCTOBER  1492),"  NPS  # 
2203.  Signed  "Henry  R.  Blaney."  On  1914  inventory.  Copy- 
righted 1892.  MML  #68. 

PHOTOGRAPH,  NPS  #2269.  "Creation  of  Man,"  captioned  in  Italian. 
Portion  of  Sistine  Chapel  showing  Michelangelo's  painting. 
Listed  in  1914  as  "detail  of  ceiling  of  Vatican."  Possibly 
purchased  by  HML  on  trip  to  Italy. 

"PRINCE  CHARLES'  CHRISTMAS  AD  1611,"  NPS  #2180.  Black  and  white 
by  Howard  Pyle.  Sticker  on  back  indicates  that  this  paint- 


38.  Quotation  from  MML  interview,  1965-66,  re:  1898  photo  ( II 1  us 
tration  17).  MMNHP  files,  "Interior  Rooms." 


127 


PIAZZA  ROOM 

ing  was  exhibited  at  the  Boston  Art  Club.     The  owner  was 
"Wide  Awake  Magazine  #123,   D.   Lothrop  &  Co." 

"FARM  HOUSE,"   NPS  #2181;  MML  #126  "Pictures."     Watercolor  by 

W.L.  Tyler.     His   idea  of  the  Peppers'    Little  Brown  House. 
Listed  on  1914  inventory. 

"WHITTIER  AND  THE  CHILDREN,"   NPS   #2153.     Signed  "Louis  Meynelle." 
Made  for  HML's  book  of  the  same  title.     Listed  on  1914  in- 
ventories.    A  west  wall    location  is   indicated  by  the  1922 
photo. 

PHOTOGRAPH  "COLOGNE  CATHEDRAL,"  NPS  #2159.  3  views  in  one  frame. 
These  belonged  to  HML's  father,  Sidney  Stone,  a  New  Haven, 
Connecticut  architect.     See  Illustration  18. 

PHOTOGRAPH   "TOWER  OF  PISA,"  NPS  #2345;  MML  #27.     This   is   listed  on 

the  1914  inventory,  and  was  on  the  west  wall    in  the  northeast 
corner  of  the  room  in  1922.     Miss  Lothrop  associates   it  with 
the  lower  front  hall  where  she  hung  it  in  1937.     The  photo 
belonged  to  HML's  father,  Sidney  Stone. 

PHOTOGRAPH,   NPS   #2241;  MML  #117.     Listed  on  the  1914   inventory.      In- 
formation on  the  back  of  the  picture  indicates  that  it  was 


128 


PIAZZA  ROOM 

purchased  abroad  and  framed  in  this  country.  The  1914  in- 
ventory also  lists  a  "Photo:  Acropolis  at  Athens  (Parthe- 
non)" which  the  Park  Service  does  not  own. 

PHOTOGRAPH,  NPS  #2447;  MML  #115.  Colored  photograph  of  public 
neoclassical  building  ("resembling  the  Parthenon")  with 
American  flag  on  top.  Written  under  the  photo,  "Thuss." 
and  "Nashville."  No  date.  The  park  acguired  this  photo 
from  MML  in  1970. 

Furniture 

TABLE,  NPS  #2044;  MML  "Tables"  #11.  An  oblong,  green  wicker  table 
purchased  by  HML  for  use  on  the  piazza.  A  letter  from  HML 
to  MML  May  7,  1899  mentioned  a  new  green  willow  piazza  table 
and  easy  chair,  cushioned  to  match. 

TABLE,  NPS  #2045;  MML  "Tables"  #11.  Also  purchased  for  use  on  the 
piazza. 

CHAIR,  NPS  #2544.  Wicker,  sguare  back.  Used  on  the  piazza. 

CHAIR,  NPS  #2545.  Wicker,  oval  back.  Used  on  the  piazza. 

ARMCHAIR,  NPS  #2013;  MML  "Chairs  #35."  A  rococco  revival,  shield 
back  armchair  with  walnut  arms,  mid-nineteenth  century,  with 


129 


PIAZZA  ROOM 


black  horsehair  upholstery.  MML  is  not  certain  which  of  her 
parents  purchased  this  chair.  This  chair  is  part  of  a  parlor 
suite. 

SIDECHAIR,  NPS  #2005;  MML  "Chairs  #19."  A  lady's  chair,  part  of 
the  same  parlor  suite  as  NPS  #2013  above.  See  Illustration 
19. 

ARMCHAIR,  NPS  #2700;  MML  "Chairs  #38."  Upholstered  in  black  horse- 
hair (back  and  seat),  with  mahogany  arms  and  leqs.  MML  be- 
lieved this  chair  might  have  been  DL's.  It  dates  to  the  mid- 
nineteenth  century  and  could  be  part  of  the  parlor  set  in  Mrs. 
Hawthorne's  parlor. 

BASKET,  NPS  #2727.  Wicker.  This  represents  a  wicker  basket  listed 
in  the  1914  inventory.  No  history  survives,  except  that  MML 
gave  it  to  MMNHP  in  1970. 

BOOKCASE,  NPS  #2032;  MML  Bookcases  #1.  HML  told  MML  that  the  book- 
case belonged  to  the  Hawthornes .  Her  source  for  this  fact  is 
unknown.  As  stated  above,  the  room  was  Hawthorne's  library/ 
study  and  numerous  references  document  Hawthorne's  bookshelves 
and  their  contents.  Because  the  shelves  are  not  described  in 


130 


PIAZZA  ROOM 

detail,  we  cannot  confirm  the  presence  of  this  bookcase. 39 
The  bookcase  was  located  in  the  Bay  Window  Room  in  1937  (see 
Illustration  5). 

Lighting  Devices 

CANDLESTICK,  NPS  #2594;  MML  "Candleholders  #10."  This  is  a  version  of 

a  menorah.  MML  recorded  that  HML  purchased  it  around  1906.  No 

reason  is  cited  for  the  purchase. 

Books  Listed  in  Various  Inventories  of  This  Room 
PEPPERS  AT  SCHOOL  (1903),  NPS  #8752. 

PEPPERS  AND  FRIENDS,  NPS  #8710. 

PEPPERS  ABROAD,  NPS  #8713. 

TWO  LITTLE  FRIENDS  IN  NORWAY,  NPS  #8786.  This  was  illustrated  by 
Herman  Hyer  whose  illustrations  hang  in  the  sitting  room. 

A  LITTLE  MAID  OF  BOSTON  TOWN,  NPS  #8769. 


39.  William  Dean  Howells,  a  visitor  to  Hawthorne,  recorded,  "After 
tea,  he  showed  me  a  bookcase,  where  there  were  a  few  books  toppling 
about  the  half-filled  shelves  and  said,  coldly  'This  is  my  library,'" 
Howells,  Literary  Friends  and  Acquaintances,  p.  54,  as  quoted  in 
MMNHP  files  "Interior,  Specific,  Bookcase." 


131 


PIAZZA  ROOM 
HESTER,  NPS  #8764. 

PASSING  OF  THIRD  FLOOR  BACK,  NPS  #  2693.  Jerome  K.  Jerome.  MML 
attended  this  play  in  January,  1914.  The  book  contains 
clipped  reviews  of  the  performance,  which  starred  Forbes- 
Robertson,  and  a  notice  of  the  actor's  retirement. 

HAWTHORNE  CENTENARY,  NPS  #8915. 

CONCORD  GUIDE  BOOK,  NPS  #9023.  Bartlett.  Published  by  D.  Lothrop 
and  inscribed  by  Harriett  M.  Stone,  July  4,  1881. 

HAWTHORNE  AND  HIS  WIFE,  NPS  #8901,  NPS  #8902  (volumes  I  and  II). 
Jul ian  Hawthorne. 

THE  MARBLE  FAUN,  NPS  #9021.  Nathaniel  Hawthorne.  Inscribed  by 
Mrs.  Lothrop,  1905. 

ROMOLA,  NPS  #9266  and  NPS  #9267.  Volumes  I  and  II. 

LADY  OF  THE  LIGHT  HOUSE,  NPS  #9052.  Inscribed  by  the  author, 
Helen  S.  Woodruff. 

Window  Hangings 

In  an  interview,  MML  recalled  that  her  mother  used  full-length 
curtains  on  the  windows  after  1905.  She  does  not  describe  the 
curtains,  however. 


132 


SITTING  ROOM 

The  nineteenth-century  photographs  of  this  room  are  important  docu- 
ments of  what  small,  personalizing  objects  were  in  the  sitting  room. 
We  know  that  HML  and  the  photographers  "arranged"  the  rooms  before 
the  photos  were  taken;  nevertheless,  they  tell  us  which  items  she  saw 
as  important.  Illustration  20  from  1888  shows  a  large  fan  stuck  be- 
hind a  picture  on  the  wall;  pine  cones  hung  from  the  corner  of  the 
fire  screen  and  from  the  corner  of  the  shelves  over  the  mantel.  Vases 
of  flowers  are  visible  in  the  photos.  The  1898  photo,  Illustration  15, 
shows  small  items--an  American  flag  placed  in  a  glass  on  the  mantel;  a 
child's  toy  hanging  from  the  edge  of  the  shelves;  a  flower  vase  in  a 
woven  wicker  holder  hanging  from  the  edge  of  the  mantel --all  imparting 
a  sense  of  life  to  the  room.  Two  calendars  from  Boston  insurance  com- 
panies hang  on  the  wall.  A  woven  basket  for  holding  letters  hangs 
from  the  fire  screen.  On  the  mantel,  a  drawing  signed  "ML"  stands 
behind  the  porcelain  cups.  This  is  undoubtedly  a  child's  drawing  made 
with  a  compass  and  colored  inks  which  MML  made  and  HML  displayed  with 
motherly  pride.  Books  are  piled  everywhere  and  family  photos  are 
closely  grouped  with  more  concern  for  their  inclusion  in  the  room  than 
for  their  aesthetic  effect.  It  is  important  that  this  level  of  taste 
is  maintained.  This  sitting  room  was  for  the  Lothrops  what  a  "family 
room"  is  in  a  house  today.  Here,  they  relaxed  amidst  familiar  fur- 
nishings. All  of  the  flat  art  in  the  room  was  either  from  DL's  busi- 
ness or  purchased  as  souvenirs  at  tourist  sites  around  the  world.  The 
room  was  never  intended  to  reflect  sophistication  or  elegance. 

133 


SITTING  ROOM 

Furniture 

TABLE,  NPS  #2549;  MML  "Table  #19."  Mahogany  tilt-top  candle  stand. 

Belonged  to  HML,  source  unknown.  This  has  always  been  at  the 

Wayside  according  to  MML. 

CHAIR,  NPS  #2012;  MML  "Chairs  #15."  Ladderback  rocker.  HML  main- 
tained a  label  on  this  chair  which  read  "A  Chair  brought  over 
from  England  in  16  .  .  .  ."  This  belonged  to  the  Stone  family. 
It  was  inventoried  in  the  sitting  room  in  1914.  The  woods  of 
this  chair,  oak,  beech,  ash,  and  maple,  tend  to  indicate  an 
American,  not  an  English,  origin. 

TABLE,  NPS  #2019;  MML  "Tables  #8."  MML  purchased  this  from  Miss  Hough- 
ton in  1933.  She  kept  it  in  the  sitting  room. 

CHAIR,  NPS  #2055;  MML  #17.  Belonged  to  HML's  family.  "York"  type, 

bannister-back  chairs  popular  in  coastal  Connecticut.  Visible 
in  Illustration  20,  c.  1888. 

CHAIR,  NPS  #1688;  MML  "Chairs  #20."  Bow-back  Windsor.  MML  believed 
Julian  Hawthorne  bought  this  chair  in  Maine  and  left  it  at  the 
Wayside  during  the  period  when  his  sister,  Rose  H.  Lathrop 
owned  the  house.  There  is  no  documentation  for  this. 


134 


SITTING  ROOM 

DESK,   NPS  #2023;  MML   "Tables   #23."     This  may  have  been  in  DL's   store. 

MML  remembers  seeing  her  mother  write  one  of  the  Five  Little 

Peppers  novels  on  it. 

CHAIR,   NPS  #2724.     Fan-back  Windsor.     Given  to  MMNHP  by  MML.     No  fur- 
ther documentation. 

TABLE,  NPS  #2029;  MML  "Tables  #3."     Mid-nineteenth-century  Rococco- 
revival   table  with  green  marble  top.     HML  stated  that  the  top 
came  from  a  quarry  owned  by  her  father,  Sidney  Mason  Stone  of 
New  Haven.     MML  found  a  newspaper  account  of  a  quarry  near 
Guilford,  Connecticut,  among  HML's  papers.     The  legs  of  this 
table  were  chewed  by  a  St.   Bernard  dog  that  MML  owned  as  a 
child.     Visible  in  Illustrations  15,  20,   21,  and  22. 

CHAIR,   NPS  #2588;  MML   "Chairs   #9."     Wicker  rocker.     This  was  HML's 

favorite  chair,  purchased  about  1884  by  the  Lothrops.     HML  sat 
in  this  chair,   in  this  room,  and  devised  the  Five  Little  Peppers 
stories . 


SHELVES,   NPS  #2548.     The  shadow  box,  or  shelving  system,  above  the 

40 
fireplace  was  HML's  design.     She  displayed  her  souvenirs  here. 


40.      Interview,  Carroll /MML,   undated,   transcription,  MMNHP  files 


135 


SITTING  ROOM 

Prints  and  Paintings 

PRINT,  NPS  #2313.  Colored  photo.  This  was  listed  on  the  1914  inven- 
tory. The  description  on  the  photo  is  in  Italian.  Possibly 
HML  purchased  it  during  a  trip  to  Italy  as  she  did  a  number  of 
other  photos. 

PRINTS,  NPS  #2227,  NPS  #2228.  Angels.  Mentioned  on  the  1914  and 
1915  inventories. 

PHOTOGRAPH,  NPS  #2264.  HML  portrait  taken  about  the  time  she  founded 
the  CAR. 

PRINT,  NPS  #2229.  "Madonna  and  Child."  HML  brought  this  from  Italy. 
The  print  is  probably  from  the  painting  by  Fra  Lippo  Lippi. 

PAINTING,  NPS  #2155.  By  Herman  Heyer.  An  original  painting  of  a 
young  girl  made  for  an  edition  of  HML's  How  They  Grew  Up. 

PAINTING,  NPS  #2154.  MML  "Pictures  #3."  Watercolor  by  Kate  Green- 
away.  DL  purchased  this  from  Kate  Greenaway  in  1880. 

ADVERTISEMENT,  NPS  #2370.  Printed  advertisement  for  "A  New  Pepper 
Book,  for  1904,  Five  Little  Peppers  and  Their  Friends."  This 
ad,  given  to  MMNHP  by  MML,  bears  a  photo  of  Margaret  Sidney. 


136 


SITTING  ROOM 

PAINTING,  NPS  #2149;  MML  #13.  "White  Mountains  from  N.  Conway"  by 
Edwin  C.  Champruy.  Oil.  Miss  Lothrop  said  that  this  came 
from  the  D.  Lothrop  Co.,  and  the  frame  is  so  marked.  There 
is  another  painting  on  the  reverse  side  of  the  frame  which 
remained  undiscovered  until  Elizabeth  Jones  of  the  Fogg  Mu- 
seum treated  the  work.  Miss  Lothrop  knew  nothing  of  the 
second  painting.  Listed  on  the  1915  inventory. 

PAINTING,  NPS  #2448;  MML  #41.  Watercolor,  signed  "W .  Andrews." 
Listed  on  the  1915  inventory. 

PHOTOGRAPHS,  NPS  #s  2349,  2350,  2351,  2353.  Photographs  of  Wagner, 
his  home,  his  grave,  and  the  opera  house,  all  in  the  same 
frame.  HML  brought  these  back  from  Europe  in  1901  after  she 
heard  "The  Flying  Dutchman"  at  the  Opera  House.  The  framed 
photos  hang  in  the  sitting  room  over  the  green  marble-topped 
table  against  the  north  wall  of  the  room  (see  Illustrations 
21  and  22). 

PHOTOGRAPH,  NPS  #2261;  MML  #17.  "Lincoln  Cathedral."  HML  brought 
this  from  England.  MML  stated  this  photo  "has  been  to  the 
left  of  the  fireplace  for  many  years."  See  Illustrations  21 
and  22. 


137 


SITTING  ROOM 

PHOTOGRAPH,  NPS  #2282;  MML  #17.  "St.  Botolph's  Church,  Boston,  Eng- 
land." Visible  in  Illustrations  21  and  22,  below  "Lincoln 
Cathedral,"  to  the  left  of  the  fireplace.  HML  purchased  this. 

PHOTOGRAPH,  NPS  #2244.  HML's  grandfather,  Hervey  Mulford,  Esq.,  mer- 
chant of  New  Haven. 

PLAQUES,  NPS  #1752.  "The  Devil  Looking  Over  Lincoln."  NPS  #1753, 

"Lincoln  Imp."  These  are  steatite,  or  talc,  bas  reliefs,  copy- 
righted in  1905.  HML  purchased  these  in  England.  They  are 
renditions,  made  for  the  tourist  trade,  of  garqoyles  on  the 
Lincoln  Cathedral . 

PRINT,  NPS  #2150;  MML  "Picture  #37."  Etching  of  John  Milton.  HML 
purchased  this  in  England  and  hung  it  on  the  fireplace  sur- 
round beneath  the  sitting  room  mantel. 

PHOTOGRAPH,  NPS  #2328.  "Damas,  Arc  de  Triomphe."  Probably  purchased 
by  HML  in  the  Middle  East.  It  is  listed  on  the  1914  and  1915 
inventories  of  this  room. 

PRINT,  NPS  #2236.  "Night  Watch"  by  Rembrandt.  This  was  given  to 
MMNHP  by  HML  in  1965.  MML  notes  that  HML  bought  this  from 
Braun  in  Paris.  It  hung  on  the  east  wall  of  the  sitting  room 
between  the  fireplace  and  the  door. 


138 


SITTING  ROOM 

PHOTOGRAPH,  NPS  #2270.  Bas  relief  or  frieze.  Dancers,  with  Italian 
captions.  Possibly  purchased  in  Italy  by  HML. 

PHOTOGRAPHS  (THREE),  NPS  #2240;  MML  #149.  Three  photos  in  one  frame 
that  HML  brought  from  Europe.  Listed  on  the  1914  and  1915  in- 
ventories. Visible  over  the  desk,  south  of  the  fireplace  in 
the  1922  photo,  Illustration  21.  The  subject  is  the  Baptistery 
Doors  in  Florence. 

PHOTOGRAPH,  NPS  #2447;  MML  "Picture  #115."  Art  Building  at  the  Nash- 
ville Exhibition.  Now  in  the  Piazza  Room,  the  photo  was  located 
in  the  sitting  room  in  1914  and  1915.  Mrs.  Lothrop  gave  a  talk 
at  the  Nashville  Exhibition  and  brought  this  picture  back  with 
her. 

Ceramics  and  Glass 

VASE,  NPS  #2597.  Chinese  export  porcelain  vase.  Given  to  MMNHP  by 

MML.  Possibly  visible  on  shelves  over  mantel  in  Illustrations 

20  and  21  . 

GOBLETS,   NPS  #1628,   NPS  #1629.     Copper  lustre.     Purchased  by  HML  from 
Ephraim  Wales  Bull.     These  are  English  dating  to  1825-1830. 

TEA  CADDY,   NPS  #1631.     Chinese  export,   Imari   design.     Part  of  a  col- 
lection given  to  HML's   relatives,   H  and  N  Mulford. 


139 


SITTING  ROOM 

COFFEE  CUP,  NPS  #1604     Chinese  export,  porcelain  with  neoclassical 

SAUCER,  NPS  #1605 

TEACUP,  NPS  #1606        designs.  MML  "China  #27."  Part  of  a  set 

that  belonged  to  the  Woodruff  family.  Vis- 
ible in  center  section  of  shelves,  in  the 
1888  photo  (see  also  Illustration  20,  1898) 

CHILD'S  CUP,  NPS  #1630;  MML  "China  #23."  English  copper  lustre  mug. 
The  name  "Samuel"  is  written  in  lustre  on  one  of  the  bends. 
This  belonged  to  Samuel  Stone,  a  relation  to  HML  through  the 
Stone  Hooker  line.  Visible  on  top  shelf  over  mantel,  Illustra- 
tions 20  and  21 . 


CUP,   NPS   #1597 

TEACUP,   NPS  #1602 

BOWL,  NPS  #1599  All   HNM  monogram.     HML's   relatives   (see 

BOWL,   NPS  #1600 

TEAPOT,   NPS  #1598  explanation,  under  the  Dining  Room  above) 

CREAM  JUG,   NPS   #1595 

SUGAR  BOWL,   NPS   #1596 

LID,   NPS   #1594 


VASE,   NPS  #1661.      Imari    vase  in  shades  of  brown.     Probably  one  of  the 
darker  flowered  vases  seen  in  Illustration  15  (1898),  and  Il- 
lustration 20  (1888).     On  shelves,  over  mantel. 


CUP,   NPS  #1657,  Examples  of  English,   transfer-printed  por- 

"NORTH  BRIDGE" 
SAUCER,   NPS  #1658  celain  made  for  H.L.  Whitcomb,   Concord, 


"THE  WAYSIDE" 


Massachusetts  for  tourist  consumption.  On 
shelves  of  sitting  room. 


140 


SITTING  ROOM 

VASE,  NPS  #1633.  Mi  nature  porcelain  vase.  HML  used  this  as  a  pen 
holder.  She  wrote  in  the  sittina  room. 

BOTTLE,  NPS  #1695.  Glass,  with  windmill  for  spinning  inside.  A 
tourist  item. 

BOTTLE,  NPS  #1686.  Blown-molded  glass.  Place  in  neck  for  stopper 
which  is  missing. 

CANDY  DISH,  NPS  #1690.  Molded  nlass  with  etched  floral  design. 
Etching  and  rim  are  qold-leafed. 

GOBLET,  NPS  #1694.  Molded  glass  with  gold  rim  and  decoration. 

PERFUME  BOTTLE,  NPS  #1695.  Lead  glass,  without  stopper.  Nineteenth 
century.  Visible  on  shelves  over  mantel  in  Illustration  20 
(1888);  and  15  (1898). 

CUP,  NPS  #1689.  Blue  glass,  mold  blown.  Late  nineteenth  century. 
Belonqed  to  HML. 

GLASS,  NPS  #2599.  Etched  with  "Wagner  theatre"  and  building.  Prob- 
ably purchased  as  a  souvenir  by  HML. 

Textiles 


DRAPES.  Photographs  from  c.  1922  show  portieres  suspended  from  gold 
rings  and  a  brass  rod  across  the  doorways  to  the  Hawthorne 


141 


SITTING  ROOM 

parlor.  The  park  now  uses  reproductions  of  the  original 
(Illustration  22) . 

GOLD  FRAME  WITH  CLOTH,  NPS  #1847.  Two  framed  pieces  of  cloth,  sup- 
posedly pieces  of  Martha  Washington's  wedding  dress.  This 
belonged  to  HML. 

CURTAINS.  MML  recalled  that  HML  put  "white  curtains"  at  the  windows 

to  prevent  people  from  looking  into  the  room.  She  does  not 

describe  these  further,  but  presumably  they  were  somewhat 

41 
opaque. 

RUG.     Late  nineteenth-century  photos  of  this  room  show  what  appears 
to  be  a  red,  domestic  oriental   carpet  on  the  floor.     The  1922 
photo  shows  a  Brussels  carpet  that  HML  purchased  in  1899. 

TABLE   RUNNER,   NPS  #8350.     A  white  cotton  fringed  scarf.     Photographs 
attest  to  HML's  habit  of  decorating  tables  with  scarves,  and 
even  using  double  scarves  on  the  same  table  toward  the  late 
nineteenth  century. 

Fireplace  Equipment 

BRASS  FIRE  TONGS,   NPS  #2145.      Fire  tongs   are  visible   in  the  1898 
photo  of  the  room.      It  is  doubtful    that  #2145  are  the  same 


41.     Carroll/MML   interview,  August,   1966,  MMNHP  files 

142 


SITTING  ROOM 

pair,  but  they  did  belong  to  the  Lothrops  who  listed  tongs 
in  their  inventories. 

HEARTH  BROOM,  NPS  #8232.  Possibly  the  broom  visible  in  the  1888 
photo. 

POKER,  NPS  #2567;  MML  "Fireplace  Equipment  #14."  MML  noted  this  has 
"always  been  in  the  house." 

FIREPLACE  SHOVEL,  NPS  #2569.  A  Lothrop  family  item. 

ANDIRONS,  NPS  #1807,  NPS  #1809.  Visible  in  the  1922  photo.  The 

Lothrops  noted  brass  andirons  on  the  1915  inventory.  #1807 

and  #1809  are  identified  by  MML  as  "Bradley"  andirons  that 
belonged  to  the  Mulford  family. 

FIREPLACE  FENDER,  NPS  #1811.  In  1899,  Mrs.  Lothrop  wrote  her  daugh- 
ter that  she  had  purchased  new  brass  fenders  for  the  sitting 
room  and  dining  room.  Shown  in  Illustration  21  (1922),  the 
first  post-1899  photograph.  It  remained  in  the  sitting  room 
until  removed  by  the  park. 

FIRESCREEN,  NPS  #  2039.  A  folding  screen  is  visible  in  the  1898 
photo.  A  larger  screen,  painted  with  a  quotation  and  ever- 
green boughs  is  also  visible  in  the  earlier  photos  and  was 


143 


SITTING  ROOM 

painted  by  Rose  Lathrop  for  HML.  Quotation:  "Fire  Worships 
--Mosses  from  an  Old  Manse/Beautiful  it  is  to  see  the  strength- 
ening gleam,  the  deepening  light  that  gradually  cast  distinct 
shadows  of  the  human  figure,  the  table  and  high-backed  chairs 
upon  the  opposite  wall,  and  at  length,  as  twilight  comes  on, 
replenishes  with  living  radiance  and  makes  life  all  rose  color." 

Lighting  Devices 

LAMP.  "One  large  reading  lamp/Glass  cloth  shade"  is  listed  on  the 
1915  inventory.  The  lamp,  NPS  #2554,  is  now  in  the  sitting 
room.  Illustration  15,  made  in  1898,  shows  two  lamps  in  the 
room,  a  large  table  lamp,  and  a  hanging  lamp  suspended  from  a 
hook  in  the  ceiling  beam  over  the  table.  Both  are  oil  lamps. 

Clocks 

CLOCK,  NPS  #1583;  MML  "Clocks  #5."  Black  marble  mantel  clock,  possibly 

French.  Belonged  to  HML  &  DL.  Illustration  21  shows  this  clock 

on  the  table  against  the  north  wall. 

EAST  CHAMBER 
Furniture 

BED,  NPS  #2089;  MML  #3.  MML  believes  her  parents  bought  this  when  they 
moved  to  the  Wayside.  It  was  Mr.  &  Mrs.  Lothrops'  bed  and  HML 


144 


EAST  CHAMBER 

continued  to  use  if  after  DL's  death.  It  always  stood  in  their 
room,  the  southeast  bedroom  (east  chamber). 

CHAIR,  NPS  #2546.  The  1914  inventory  lists  a  "large,  black  wooden 
arm  chair"  in  this  room.  #2546  is  a  rush-seated,  slat-back 
armchair,  possibly  the  same  one. 

ROCKING  CHAIR,  NPS  #2581;  MML  "Chairs  #45."  This  wooden  rocker  with 
cane  seat  and  back  has  painted  decoration  on  the  crest  rail. 
MML  believes  Mrs.  Hawthorne  painted  this  chair.  MML  placed  it 
in  this  room  in  1963. 

BUREAU,  NPS  #2103;  MML  "Bureaus  and  Chests  #5."  MML  believes  that 
HML  purchased  this  from  Ephraim  Wales  Bull.  This  is  a  bow 
front,  Federal  chest  of  drawers,  with  inlaid  bandinq  around 
the  front  edge  of  the  top. 

CHAIR,  NPS  #1976;  MML  "Chairs  #30."  "Hitchcock"  type  Windsor  with 

painted  decoration  on  crest  rail.  MML  placed  it  in  this  room, 
but  supplied  no  history  on  the  piece. 

CHAIR,  NPS  #2121;  MML  "Chairs  #31."  Similar,  but  not  identical,  to 
NPS  #1976.  Two  "red  straight  chairs"  were  listed  on  the  1914 
inventory.  These  are  not  the  same  chairs. 


145 


EAST  CHAMBER 

CHEST  OF  DRAWERS,   NPS  #2697;  MML  #9.     MML  records   that  this  walnut, 
post-1876  chest  "always   stood  in  the  northeast  corner  of  the 
Hawthorne  bedroom  in  my  childhood,  and  held  my  clothes.     It 
has  a  particular  fascination  for  me,  as   it  had  happy  child- 
hood associations,  but  probably  has  no  value." 

Prints 

STONE  RUBBING,  NPS  #2787.  This  is  a  grave  rubbing  MML  reports  that 

she  made  from  Shakespeare's  grave.  It  was  in  the  dining  room 

in  1922  (see  Illustration  23). 

"WOMAN  WITH  MUFF,"  NPS  #2212.  This  is  listed  in  the  1914  and  1915 
inventories.  It  is  a  print  in  brown  tones.  The  frame  is  by 
C.H.  Dunton  &  Company,  Boston. 

PHOTOGRAPH,  NPS  #2248.  Three  birch  trees  with  pastoral  scene.  This 

was  listed  as  "photo:  two  willow  trees"  in  1915,  and  as  birches 
in  1914.  There  is  no  other  information  about  this  picture. 

PRINT,  NPS  #2789.  Angel  blowing  a  trumpet.  Presently  in  the  room;  no 
documentation.  The  1915  inventory  lists  "2  small  Fra  Angelica 
Angels."  It  does  not  list  their  media  and  perhaps  this  and 
#2790  are  the  referants. 

PRINT,  NPS  #2790.  Angel  blowing  a  trumpet.  See  #2789  above. 


146 


EAST  CHAMBER 

PHOTO  OF  EMERSON,   NPS  #2247;  MML  #91.     A  print  made  from  an  1854 

photograph.     It  is  listed  on  the  1914  inventory.     A  picture 
of  Emerson  is  visible  in  Illustration  21   of  the  sitting  room 
(1922). 

"LA  VIERGE  L'ENFANT  JESUS  ET  ST.   JEAN  BAPTISTE,"  NPS  #2119;  MML   "Pic- 
tures #23."     Print  of  painting  by  Bouquereau,  published  in 
Berlin,   1879.     MML's   note  on  back:      "Was   hunq  in  MML's   room 
from  her  earliest  years." 

PRINT,  NPS  #9492.     "Woman  in  a  Vision."     On  bottom  is  written,   "Copley 
print--1901 ."     Listed  in  this   room  on  the  1915  inventory. 

PHOTO,   NPS  #2288.     "Si bi 11  a  Cumana"   in  Sistine  Chapel,  painted  by 

Michelangelo.     This  and  #2287  below  were  probably  purchased  by 
HML  on  her  trip  abroad.     Both  were  framed  by  Bigelow  and  Jor- 
dan, Boston.     One  of  these  photos  may  be  one  listed  on  the 
1915  inventory  as   "'0  sea  and  Sylilla1,  small   photo." 

PHOTO,   NPS  #2287.      "Sibilla  Delphica"   in  the  Sistine  Chapel   by  Michel- 
angelo. 

"MADONNA  WITH  THE  CHAIR,"  NPS  #2119;  MML  #23.     MML  always   kept  this 
picture  over  her  bedroom  mantel . 


147 


EAST  CHAMBER 

"PHOTO:   WINDMILL   IN  HOLLAND."     Listed  on  the  1914  inventory;   no  other 
information  survives. 

"MADONNA  &  CHILD  IN  ROUND  BLACK  FRAME."  Listed  on  the  1914  inventory; 
no  other  information  survives. 

"PICTURE—SMALL  BLUE  DUTCH  WINDMILL."     Listed  on  the  1915  inventory, 
and  in  1914  as  "Windmill."     No  other  information  survives. 

Textiles 

RUG,  NPS  #8094.  A  Persian  style  rug.  In  1914,  a  red  rug  was  listed; 
in  1915,  a  "Large  red  rug  (Persian  pattern)/Small  red  rug  (Per- 
sian pattern)"  were  listed.  Possibly,  one  is  #8094. 

HAT,  NPS  #8154.  A  black  velvet,  tri-cornered  hat  with  white  ostrich 
feathers,  labeled  "R.H.  Stearns  &  Co.  Boston;"  in  a  hat  box 
labeled  "The  White  House,  San  Francisco;"  written  on  the  top 
of  the  box,  "Mrs.  Lothrop's  white  hat  with  feathers."  No  docu- 
mentation survives  that  this  hat  was  kept  in  this  room,  other 
than  the  empirical  evidence  that  the  Lothrops  kept  clothing  at 
the  Wayside  when  they  lived  there. 

"FOUR  GREEN  SHADES."  Listed  on  the  1915  inventory.  In  1914,  the  enu- 
merator listed  "four  blue  shades."  The  difference  might  be  due 
to  individual  color  perception.  Shades  are  missing. 


148 


EAST  CHAMBER 

"3  PAIRS  CHINTZ  CURTAINS."  Listed  in  1914.  The  park  now  uses  re- 
productions . 

"CHINTZ  BEDSPREAD  TO  MATCH."  See  above. 

MATTRESS,  NPS  #10449.  On  bed.  Listed  in  inventories. 

SHEETS,  NPS  #10447,  NPS  #10448.  In  the  room  now.  They  are   cotton 
sheets  that  belonged  to  the  Lothrops,  and  are  not  easily  dat- 
able. 

Baskets 

BASKET,   NPS  #2616.     An  unpainted  wicker  wastebasket.     The  1915  in- 
ventory lists  a  "white  basket"  which  MML  believed  was  a  waste- 

42 
basket. 

Mirrors 


MIRROR,   NPS  #2110.     A  red  mirror  was   listed  in  1914;   in  1915,   it  was 
called  a   "plate  glass  mirror."     Perhaps   #2110  is  the  latter. 
It  is  a  mid-nineteenth-century  mirror  with  a  gilt  edge.     The 
glass  may  be  replaced. 

Fireplace  Equipment 

FIREPLACE  FENDER,   NPS  #1797.     This   is   sheet  brass  over  iron.     MML  says 


42.     Ronsheim,   "Historic  Furnishings,"  p.   97 


149 


EAST  CHAMBER 

the  fender  belonged  to  HML.  In  1914  and  1915,  a  "brass  fender: 
pair  brass  andirons"  were  listed  in  this  room.  It  is  uncertain 
whether  this  is  the  same  fender. 

BRASS  ANDIRONS,  NPS  #8003,  NPS  #8004.  It  is  not  certain  whether  this 
is  the  same  set  listed  on  the  1914  and  1915  inventories.  They 
were  the  Lothrops'  possessions. 

SHOVEL,  NPS  #2144.  From  the  catalog  description  stating  that  the  han- 
dles twist  off,  it  would  appear  that  this  shovel  is  a  late 
eighteenth-century  piece.  A  "brass  handled  shovel"  was  listed 
on  the  1914  and  1915  inventories.  Possibly  this  is  the  same 
shovel . 

BRASS  TONGS,  NPS  #1794.  Part  of  set  that  belonged  to  HML.  MML  did 
not  remember  date  or  place  of  purchase. 

POKER,  NPS  #2570.  No  documentation  on  acguisition.  Given  by  MML. 

STAND,  NPS  #1793.  Part  of  a  set  purchased  by  HML. 


150 


GUEST  ROOM  OR  TERRACF  ROOM 

Furniture 

BED,  NPS  #1991 
BUREAU,  NPS  #1990 
COMMODE,  NPS  #1993 
BED  FRAME  AND  MATTRESS 
SPRINGS,  NPS  #1992 


Set  of  ash  furniture  purchased  by  HML  and 
DL  when  they  purchased  the  Wayside  in  1883. 
The  furniture  has  always  been  in  this  guest 
room.  The  case  pieces  are  distinguished  by 
their  unusual  drawer  construction.  The 
drawer  sides  are  scalloped  to  fit  into  the 
scalloped  front  and  back  and  each  scallop 
is  secured  with  a  Ja-inch  dowel.  The  writer 
has  seen  a  similar  bureau  in  a  private  Bos- 
ton collection  and  feels  the  furniture  may 
be  of  local  manufacture.  The  furniture  is 
in  the  reform  style  and  dates  to  the  last 
quarter  of  the  nineteenth  century.  See 
Illustration  24. 


WALL  RACK  WITH  MIRROR,  NPS  #1989.  Visible  in  Illustration  24.  This 

is  a  mahogany  cabinet  with  towel  rack  and  mirror.  Japan  in- 

43 
spired  decoration,  probably  post-1876. 


43.  For  an  explanation  of  the  pervasiveness  of  Japanese  decoration, 
see  Dallas  Furn,  "Japan  At  The  Centennial,"  Nineteenth  Century,  2 
(Autumn,  1976):  33-40 


151 


GUEST  ROOM  OR  TERRACE  ROOM 

HAT  RACK,  NPS  #2113.  Perhaps  this  is  the  "English  clothes  pole 
(cherry)"  listed  on  the  1914  and  1915  inventories. 

ROCKING  CHAIR,  NPS  #1981;  MML  "Chairs  #44."  Carved  back  and  seat. 
MML  notes,  "This  is  a  rocker  that  goes  with  the  grained  bed- 
room set  which  HML  and  DL  bought  when  they  moved  to  the  Way- 
side." (She  refers  to  the  ash  bedroom  set  above  as  the 
"grained"  set.) 

CHAIR,  NPS  #8438.  The  1914  and  1915  inventories  list  this  chair  with 
upholstered  chintz  pillows  matching  the  curtains.  Perhaps 
#8438,  now  in  the  room,  is  the  same  chair. 

TABLE,  NPS  #1987;  MML  "Tables  #9."  MML  notes  that  her  mother  believed 
this  belonged  to  Mrs.  Hawthorne.  MML  felt  it  belonged  to  Rose 
Hawthorne  Lathrop  but  could  supply  no  documentation.  The  table 
has  always  been  in  this  room.  It  is  a  demilune,  marble-topped 
pier  table  dating  to  the  mid-nineteenth  century. 

Mirrors 

MIRROR,  NPS  #1988;  MML  "Mirror  #1."  Grained  mirror  bought  by  the 

Lothrops  when  they  purchased  the  house.  This  is  a  pier  mirror, 
8  feet  high  by  2  feet  wide.  MML  notes  that  the  demilune  table 
(#1987)  has  always  stood  in  front  of  it. 


152 


GUEST  ROOM  OR  TERRACE  ROOM 
Textiles 

PILLOWSLIPS,  NPS  #8395,  NPS  $8398.  White  muslin,  embroidered  with 
DL's  initials. 

SLIPCOVER  FOR  BOLSTER,  NPS  #8500.  Presented  to  the  park  by  MML . 

RUG,  NPS  #8081.  A  braided  rug  with  a  history  of  use  in  this  room. 

"3  PAIRS  CHINTZ  CURTAINS."  Listed  in  the  1914  and  1915  inventories. 

44 
MML  remembers  them  with  red  flowers  on  a  white  ground.    Re- 
productions are  in  use  today. 

"3  GREEN  SHADES."  Listed  on  the  inventories. 

Lighting  Devices 

HURRICANE  LAMPS,  NPS  #2089,  NPS  #2099;  MML  "Candleholders  #11."  MML 
associates  these  with  her  mother  in  her  notes.  The  1914  and 
1915  inventories  list  "2  brass  candlesticks  with  glass  shades." 

CANDLESTICK,  NPS  #1766;  MML  "Candleholders  #8."  This  was  given  to 
the  Park  Service  by  MML,  although  there  is  no  record  of  its 
use  in  this  room  during  MML's  lifetime.  Electrified  wall 
sconces  with  glass  shades  were  in  this  room  since  1906. 


44.  Ronsheim,  "Historic  Furnishings,"  p.  128. 


153 


GUEST  ROOM  OR  TERRACE  ROOM 

Ceramics  and  Glass 

TRAY,  NPS  #2778.  European  porcelain  marked  "Victoria-Austria." 
The  1915  inventory  lists  a  "China  toilet  tray."  The  tray 
presently  in  the  room  may  not  be  this  tray. 


WATER  JUG,  NPS  #1977      Part  of  a  toilet  set.  Probably  English, 

WASH  BOWL,  NPS  #1978 

SOAP  DISH,  NPS  #1979      late  nineteenth  century.  This  belonged 

to  MML  and  is  visible  in  Illustration  24 


COLOGNE  JAR  AND  COVER,  NPS  #2452.  Given  to  the  park  by  MML.  Pre- 
sumably it  is  from  HML's  occupancy. 

Prints,  Paintings 

SKETCH,  "POLLY  PEPPER,"  NPS  #2174.  Charcoal,  bearing  HML  note  that 

it  is  a  resketch.  Probably,  this  was  drawn  for  a  publication. 

The  frame  dates  to  1880. 

"COLORED  PICTURE,  NUN  LIGHTING  CANDLES,"  NPS  #2226;  MML  #125.  Listed 
on  the  1914  and  1915  inventories  of  this  room.  MML  notes  this 
was  connected  with  D.  Lothrop  &  Co. 

PAINTING,  NPS  #2156.  The  1914  inventory  lists  "Old  Mill"  by  Edwin  G. 
Champney  in  this  room. 


154 


LARGE  BATHROOM 

45 
Bathtub,  water  closet,  and  lavatory  are  believed  original.    See 

Illustration  25.  In  May  2,  1967  interview,  MML  recalled  that  "The 

Old  Bath  Tub  had  a  wooden  flat  top  which  covered  the  edge  of  the  tin 

46 
tub." 


Metals 

WIRE  SOAP  DISH,  NPS  #10467.  Mr.  Lothrop  kept  a  set  of  pulling  weights 

47 
on  the  north  wall  bathroom.  The  original  set  is  lost. 


Furniture 

WINDSOR  CHAIR,   NPS   #2017.     The  chair  carries  a   tradition  of  being  in 

Hawthorne's  study  at  the  Wayside.     The  exact  date  is  not  clear. 

The  chair  is  mid-nineteenth  century;  whether  it  was   in  the 

house  before  1924  is   unknown. 

CHEST,   Possibly  NPS  #2696.     MML  recorded  a  large  "black  stained  chest 
of  drawers"   in  the  room  on  her  1935  inventory.     In  an  interview 
with  Orville  Carroll    in  1966,  she  stated  the  chest  had  always 


45.  Interview,  Carrol 1/MML,  August  18,   1966,  Draft  p.   39  of  transcrip- 
tion, MMNHP  files. 

46.  MMNHP  files,   "Interior  Rooms."     MML  told  Orville  Carroll    that  the 
Lothrops   had  a  painted  metal    tub  when  she  was  a  girl,  Carrol 1/MML   in- 
terview, August  16,   1966,   draft  transcription,   p.   22,  MMNHP  files. 

47.  MMNHP   files. 


155 


LARGE  BATHROOM 

been  in  the  bathroom.   It  had  a  history  of  belonging  to  the 
Hawthornes.  HML  is  believed  to  have  purchased  it  from  the 

Lathrops  in  1883.48 

MIRROR;  MML  #6.  Probably  purchased  by  MML.  This  is  still  in  the 
bathroom,  but  apparently  has  no  NPS  number. 

Texti les 

GREEN  WINDOW  SHADE.  Listed  on  1914  inventory. 

MAID'S  ROOM 

Furniture 

IRON  BED.  Two  were  listed  on  the  1914  inventory.  One,  a  twin-sized 

bed,  NPS  #10466,  is  in  the  room.  See  Illustrations  26  and 

27. 

BUREAU.      In   1914,   2   bureaus   were   in   this   room.     One,    a  brown  dress- 
er,  MML  #11,   was   purchased  by  HML.      NPS  #2114  is   in   the   room 
now.     This   is   MML  #13,   "Bureaus   and  Chests,"   pine,   three-draw- 
er chest   painted   green,   with   round  walnut   pulls.     MML  noted 
that  HML  found   this   chest   built   into   the   house. 

WASHSTAND,    NPS  #1980;   MML  #3.     This   was   in   the   garage   in  1931,    and 

is   now   in   the  Maid's   Room.     The  1914   inventory  listed   a  brown 

48.      Ibid. 


156 


MAID'S   ROOM 

washstand  in  this   room,  but  there  is   no  further  record  of 
the  object. 

SIDE  CHAIR,   NPS  #2646.     Cane  seat;   simulated  black  walnut  finish. 
Now  in  the  Maid's   Room. 

TABLE,   NPS  #2196 ;  MML   "Tables"    (p.   59,   1935),   noted  that  this   table 
belongs   to  the  grained  set   in  the  guest  room.      It  was   grained 
to  match  the  set  brought  by  HML  and  DL  for  the  Terrace  Room. 
Now  in  the  Maid's   Room. 

ROCKING  CHAIR,   NPS   #2440.     Caned  seat  and  back.     MML   "Chairs   #41." 
Now  in  the  Maid's   Room. 

MIRROR,   NPS  #2134.     Now  in  the  Maid's   Room. 

Textiles 

RUG.  The  1914  inventory  lists  a  large  rug  in  this  room.  It  is  now 

missing.  NPS  #8084  and  NPS  #8085,  hooked  rugs,  no  date,  are 

presently  in  the  room. 

CURTAINS.  The  1914  inventory  lists  2  curtains  at  the  windows.  MML 
recalled  light,  or  medium  blue  curtains  but  did  not  remember 
the  pattern. 

"2  CURTAINS  TO  CLOTHES  PRESSES."  Four  pairs  of  blue  and  white  closet 
curtains  were  used  in  1914  to  transform  built-in  shelves  into 


157 


MAID'S  ROOM 

closets.  These  are  missing. 

MATTRESSES,  NPS  #10464.  This  is  a  tufted  mattress  with  blue  and 
white  ticking. 

PILLOWS,  NPS  #9441,  NPS  #2093.  Feather  pillows. 

SHEET,  NPS  #8506.  Bears  Lothrop  laundry  mark. 

BEDSPREAD,  NPS  #10463.  White  with  blue  and  pink  stripes. 

Prints 

FRAMED  PRINT  OF  GIRL  IN  WHITE  DRESS,  NPS  #2214.  MML,  #1360,  feels 
this  could  be  from  D.  Lothrop  &  Co. 

FRAMED  PRINT  OF  MAN  AND  WOMAN  WALKING,  NPS  #2216;  MML  "Picture 
#138." 

FRAMED  PRINT  OF  GIRL  IN  NEOCLASSICAL  DRESS,  NPS  #2214. 


158 


SMALL  BATHROOM 

In  an  interview  with  Orville  Carroll,  MML  stated  that,  to  the  best 
of  her  knowledge,  the  bathtub,  water  closet,  and  lavatory  were 
original  to  the  room.  The  room  was  converted  to  a  bathroom  by  HML 
around  1910.  The  only  furnishing  in  this  room  is  a  wooden,  three- 
drawer  chest,  NPS  #10462;  MML  "Bureaus  and  Chests,  #11."  The  room 
was  never  intended  to  be  furnished  (see  Carroll,  ADS)  and  no  data 
on  furnishings  from  MML  survives. 

TOWER  STUDY 

Floor  Covering 

49 
MML  thinks  a  rug  may  have  been  on  the  floor.    In  Illustrations  28 

(1898),  29  (c.  1902),  and  30  (c.  1928),  a  rug  is  visible.  In  the 

1902  stereoview,  a  small  Brussels  carpet  is  visible.  A  large  "rug 

with  fringe"  is  visible  in  the  1898  and  1928  views.  This  appears 

to  be  an  oriental  or  a  domestic  oriental  carpet.  Illustration  31 

is  later  than  the  1898  photo.  The  large  carpet  has  been  removed 

but  "ghosts"  from  it  are  visible.  The  1928  view  shows  the  edge  of 

the  carpet.  The  whereabouts  of  this  carpet  is  unknown.  The  1915 

inventory  lists  "2  small  blue  rugs."  They  are  missing. 


49.  Carrol 1/MML  interview,  August  19,  1966,  transcription,  Draft, 
p.  54. 


159 


TOWER  STUDY 

Furniture 

TABLE,  NPS  #2014;  MML  #20.  This  is  a  mahogany  Pembroke  table  which 
the  Misses  Lothrop  believe  belonged  to  Julian  Hawthorne  be- 
cause Mr.  Hawthorne  lived  in  the  Caribbean  and  the  table  is 
made  of  Honduras  Mahogany.  In  fact,  Caribbean  mahogany  was 
imported  into  the  colonies  regularly.  The  table  was  in  the 

house  when  the  Lothrops  purchased  it.  Illustration  28  places 

50 
the  table  in  this  room  as  early  as  1898. 

BOOKCASE,  WARDROBE,  NPS  #2208.  A  large,  walnut-stained  wardrobe 

used  as  a  bookcase.  MML  also  noted  that,  according  to  Julian 

Hawthorne,  his  father  kept  books  in  the  built-in  closets  seen 

51 
in  Illustration  30. 

CHAIR,  NPS  #2000;  MML  "Chairs  #13."  Red  paint.  MML  believes  this 
chair  was  in  the  Wayside  when  her  parents  bought  it.  It  may 
be  the  same  red  Windsor  chair  listed  on  the  1915  kitchen  in- 
ventory. A  Windsor  chair  is  pictured  in  Illustration  28 
(1898). 


50.  MML  interview,  1965-66,  transcript,  p.  40,  MMNHP  files,  "Inte- 
rior Rooms,  Tower  Study." 

51.  Ibid.,  p.  42. 


160 


TOWER  STUDY 

CHAIR,  NPS:  MML  "Chairs  #21."  MML  notes  that  she  bought  this  Wind- 
sor chair.  She  does  not  date  the  purchase.  Possibly  it  was 
acquired  after  1924.  All  photos  of  the  Tower  Study  show  one 
chair  which,  judging  from  its  turnings,  was  placed  in  differ- 
ent areas  of  the  room. 

TABLE,  NPS  #2016;  MML  "Tables  #6A."  MML  seems  to  have  attributed 

the  same  Hawthorne  provenance  to  two  different  tables,  or  the 
park  has  given  the  same  two  numbers,  #2014  and  #2016. 

PEDESTAL,  NPS  #2209.  This  is  a  pine  pedestal  (painted  green)  which 
was  used  to  support  a  bust.  It  is  described  in  the  1914  in- 
ventory as  "1  green  standard  for  Bust." 

BOOKCASE,  NPS  #2204;  MML  #16.  This  revolving  bookcase  belonged  to 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Lothrop.  It  was  in  the  tower  in  1935. 

Sculpture 

BUST,  NPS  #2306;  MML  "Picture  #107."  Pestalozzi.  According  to  MML, 
this  belonged  to  Bronson  Alcott  and  was  kept  in  his  temple 
school  of  philosophy.  Possibly,  HML  brought  it  to  the  Way- 
side when  she  acquired  the  Orchard  House.  The  bust  is  mark- 
ed with  Pestalozzi  's  name  on  the  front  of  the  base. 

BUST,  NPS  #2571;  MML  "Picture  #152."  Benjamin  Franklin.  Origin 
uncertain. 


161 


TOWER  STUDY 

BUST,  NPS  #1986;  MML  "Pictures  #151."  Charles  Sumner  in  classic 

dress.  RDR  speculates  that  the  Sumner  and  Franklin  busts 

may  have  belonged  to  Lothrop's  publishing  firm  because  they 

appear  in  an  old  photo  taken  before  the  purchase  of  Orchard 

52 
House.    Ronsheim  identifies  Sumner  on  the  basis  of  the 

1915  inventory  and  the  bust's  resemblance  to  pictures  of 

Sumner.  He  notes  that  Hawthorne  and  Sumner  were  friends 

despite  their  differences  on  slavery. 

BUST,  NPS  #2301;  MML  "Picture  #108."  This  Plato  has  a  beard;  but 
his  name  is  on  the  back  of  the  bust.  MML  thinks  that  her 
mother  may  have  acquired  this  with  the  Orchard  House.  Al- 
cott  admired  Plato. 

BUST,  NPS  #2300;  MML  "Picture  #109."  MML  believes  this  came  from 
the  School  of  Philosophy. 

Prints 

PRINT,  NPS  #2100;  MML  "Picture  #84."  Lithograph  of  Hawthorne, 

signed  "H .  Baker  Del."  and  printed  by  "Armstrong  &  Co.  Lith, 
Boston,  Copyright  Houghton,  Mifflin,  &  Co.  1883."  This  be- 
longed to  MML.  Originally,  a  newspaper  in  the  back  of  the 


52.  Ronsheim,  "Historic  Furnishings,"  p.  136 


162 


TOWER  STUDY 

frame  was  marked,  "Boston  Evening  Transcript,  August  21, 
1894."  This  is  visible  over  the  mantel  in  Illustrations  28, 
31,  and  on  the  wall  of  the  stair-tower  in  Illustration  32. 

CERTIFICATE,  NPS  #2206;  MML  "Picture  #103."  In  1915,  this  hung  in 
the  Tower  Study.   It  is  presently  in  the  Old  Room. 

Photographs  of  the  Tower  Study  supply  additional  information  on 
placement  of  objects  in  the  room.   Illustration  28  taken  in  1898 
shows  interior  louvered  shutters  or  "blinds"  as  New  Englanders  call 
them.  A  hanging  bookshelf  is  visible  on  the  west  wall.  A  hanging 
lamp  appears  in  the  upper  foreground,  and  matching  astral  lamps  with 
glass  pendants  adorn  the  mantel.   In  Illustrations  29  and  33  of  the 
west  wall,  two  framed  prints  are  leaning  against  the  mantel  and  a 
large  card  with  legible  label  copy  is  leaning  against  the  wall. 
Above  the  card,  an  illustration  of  what  appears  to  be  Hester  Prynne 
knocking  on  a  door  is  tacked  to  the  wall.  The  right  edge  of  the  paper 
is  ragged  as  if  it  were  torn  from  a  book,  probably  an  edition  of  The 
Scarlet  Letter.  Finally,  illustrations  show  that  HML  associated 
evergreen  boughs  with  historical  interpretation.  This  is  very 
revealing  about  her  view  of  the  property  as  a  historic  shrine. 


163 


UNA'S   ROOM 
Furniture 

BED,  NPS  #2067; 

MML  #1 
BUREAU,  NPS  #2069; 

MML  #1 
COMMODE,  NPS  #2068; 

MML  #1 
WASHSTAND,  NPS  #2070 

MML  #2 


All  part  of  a  mid-nineteenth-century  neo- 
Grec  bedroom  suite.  Labeled,  "Paine's 
Furniture  Manufactory  141,  143,  145,  147, 
149,  151,  153,  and  155  Friend  Street  and 
48,  50,  52,  54,  56,  58,  60,  and  62  Canal 
Street,  Boston,  Mass ./U.S.A."  The  set  is 
walnut  and  poplar  with  applied  burl  veneer 
designs.  MML  believes  the  set  is  from 
DL's  first  marriage.  The  large  size  of 
the  furniture  limits  placement  in  the 
room.  The  present  arrangement  matches 
that  seen  in  Illustration  34,  made  about 
1888.  The  upholstered  box  spring  is  at- 
tached to  the  bed. 


ROCKER,  NPS  #2056;  MML  "Chairs  #28."  Walnut,  upholstered  rocker. 

MML  recalled  that  this  rocker  had  always  been  in  the  house. 

Fabric  for  the  upholstery  was  given  to  MML  by  a  friend  in 
California  about  1930. 

CHAIR,  NPS  #2565;  MML  "Chairs  #32."  Bird  cage  Windsor,  late  eigh- 
teenth or  early  nineteenth  century.  MML  notes  that  this  was 


164 


UNA'S   ROOM 

Ezra  Ripley's  chair  and  that  HML  had  his   name  burned   into 
the  back  of  the  seat.     The  1888  photo   (Illustration  34) 
shows  a  bow  back  Windsor  in  the   room. 

TOWEL  RACK,   NPS   #2695.     Mid-  to  late  nineteenth  century.     A  "white 
English  clothes  pole"  was  listed  in  the  1914  inventory.     This 
is  missing  today. 

WICKER  ROCKER.     The  1898  photo  shows  a  wicker  rocker.     This   is   now 
in  the  piazza   room  on  the   first  floor.     Rocker  #2056   takes 
its   place.     We  should  remember  that  the  rooms  were  "arranged" 
for  the  Cousins'    photographs  and  that  the  Windsor  chair  and 
the  rocker  might  not  have  been  in  this   room  at  all    times. 

Paintings,   Prints 

"MARY,  QUEEN  OF  SCOTS,"  NPS  #2233.     Print  brought  from  England  by 

HML.     This  was   listed  in  this   room  in  an  undated,   post-1924 

inventory. 

"GIRL  WITH  FLOWERS,"  NPS  #2053;  MML  "Picture  #10."  "He  loves  me  a 
little,"  by  August  Heckel ,  published  by  Col  ton,  Zalen,  and 
Roberts.  MML  thinks  that  her  father  bought  this.  It  was 
over  the  mantel  in  the  1888  photo. 

"CHARMING  KATE,"  NPS  #2182;  MML  "Pictures  #7."  Listed  in  the  1914 
inventory.  This  is  a  chromolithograph. 


165 


UNA'S   ROOM 

"GIRLS  ON  STAIRCASE,"   NPS   #2220.     Black  and  white  photograph.     Prob- 
ably the  "Maiden's  Stairway"   listed  on  the  1914  inventory. 
It  is  a  photo  of  a  Burne-Jones  print  titled  "Stairway  of 
Life. "     No  MML  number. 

"AVE  MARIA,"   NPS  #2299.     This   is   Delia   Robbia's   "Annuciation,"   that 
was   inventoried  in  1914. 

"UNA  HAWTHORNE."     Copy  of  oil    portrait.     Presently  located  over  the 
mantel.     There  is  no  historical   precedent  for  its   placement. 
This  was  Miss  Hawthorne's  bedroom  when  she  lived  here  (see 
Illustration  35,  believed  post-1924). 

Textiles 

MATTRESS,  NPS  #8522.  A  patchwork  quilt  presented  to  the  Wayside  by 

MML.  The  1898  photo  shows  a  quilted  comforter  folded  at  the 

foot  of  the  bed. 

PILLOW  SLIPS,  NPS  #9440,  NPS  #9442.  Embroidered  "DL"  and  "HML"  on 
edges.  The  1915  inventory  lists  "2  pair  show  pillows/4  white 
cotton  cases  for  same."  These  would  be  the  large  bolsters 
displayed  in  the  1898  photograph. 

TOWELS,  NPS  #s  2475,  8381,  8333.  MML  believes  the  decorations  on 
#2475  are  associated  with  Ellen  Emerson.  No  references  to 
the  other  towels  survive. 


166 


UNA'S   ROOM 

BEDSPREAD.  There  is  presently  a  white,  trapunto  bedspread  on  the 
bed.     The  1898  photo  does  not  clearly  show  the  bed  cover- 
ing.    The  bedspread  belongs   to  MML. 

"2  RUG-LIKE  CARPETS,"   "BODY   BRUSSELS  CARPET."      "In  1899,   Mrs.    Loth- 

rop  put  a  Body  Brussels  carpet,   blue  and  white  with  a  border, 

in  this   room.      It  was   still    there  in  1915  along  with   rugs. 

The  undated  inventory  lists   blue  rugs.     It  was  not  there  in 

1928,   perhaps  because  of  the  1922  floor  and  the  age  of  the 

carpet,  although  this   room,   the  best  guest  room,  would  have 

received  little  use.     The  Body  Brussels  Carpet  is  now  gone;" 

the  2  rugs  are  also  missing.     Two  braided  rugs  (modern)  are 

53 
in  the  room  now. 

SHEET,  NPS  #8513.  Received  from  MML.  Age  undetermined. 

CURTAINS,  NPS  #s  10416,  10417,  10418.  These  are  white,  sheer  cur- 
tains which  MML  presented  with  the  house.  In  1914,  "3  pairs 
Muslin  curtains"  were  at  the  windows.  The  1888  photo  shows 
lightweight  curtains  at  the  windows  with  deep,  printed  val- 
ances and  matching  drapes  over  the  closet.  A  reproduction, 
Schumacher  fabric  is  used  for  the  closet  drapes  now.  The 
original  Persian  chintz  portieres  are  missing. 


53.  Ibid.,  p.  114. 


167 


UNA'S   ROOM 

"TWO  WHITE   SHADES/3  BLUE   SHADES."      Listed    in   the  1914   inventory;    now 
missing.     HML  brought   fabric  from  Liberty's   of  London  which 
she   had  made   into   a  set   of   curtains   around  1900-1910.      The 
present   reproductions   attempt   to  match  the  fabric. 

"1    LONG   DUTCH   BLUE   MANTEL   COVERING   FROM   HOLLAND. "/"I    DUTCH   BLUE 
TABLE  COVER  ON  COMMODE."     These   are   listed   on   the  1914  inventory. 
They  are  now  missing.     A  table   cover  with   a  lace  edge   is 
visible  on  the  commode   in   the  Cousins'    photograph   (Illustra- 
tion 34).     A  mantel    cover   is   visible   in   the   same  photo. 

Lighting  Devices 

CANDLESTICK,  IMPS  #1767,  NPS  #1768;  MML  #2.  Marked  "382  James  Dixon  & 

Sons  53."  MML  feels  the  sticks  are  old.  They  date  to  about 

1850.  HML  purchased  them  in  England. 

Clocks 

CLOCK,  NPS  #1582;  MML  "Clocks  #3."  Marked  "Ansonia  Clock  Co.,  An- 

sonia,  Conn.  Patented,  June  14,  1881."  MML  believes  that  her 

parents  purchased  the  clock  before  they  bought  the  Wayside. 

Baskets 

BASKET,  NPS  #8150.  A  small,  wicker  basket.  There  is  a  small  straw 

basket  on  the  mantel  in  Illustration  34;  #8150  might  not  be  the 

same  basket  in  the  photograph. 


168 


UNA'S  ROOM 
Metals 

VASE,  NPS  #2777.     A  small   enameled  tin-vase.     Visible  on  the  mantel 
in   Illustration  35. 

Ceramics  &  Glass 

"LARGE  BLUE   CHINESE   ENAMELED  VASE;"    "PALE  BLUE  VASE."     These  are 

listed  on  the  1914   inventory.     They  are  also  visible   in  the 
1898  photo  of  the   room.     They  appear  to  date  to   the  last 
quarter  of  the  nineteenth  century.     Both  are  missing. 

"2  SMALL  BRASS  MIRRORS  ON  THE  WALL;"   MML   "Mirrors   #10  &  11."     These 
were  sconces  that  HML  purchased  abroad.     They  are  missing. 

PERFUME  BOTTLES,   NPS  #1683,   NPS  #1684.     These  are  cut  glass  with 

qlass  stoppers.     Cataloger  Cordelia  Snow  attributes   them  to 
the  nineteenth-century  French  firm,  Baccarat.     They  belonged 
to  the  Lothrops . 

WASH  SET:   SOAP  DISH,   NPS   #2774;   SLOP  JAR,   NPS   #2775;   CHAMBER  POT, 
NPS  #2776;  MML  #11.     English,   blue,  and  white  set.     MML  recalled   it 
in  the  Wayside  in  Una's  room  since  her  childhood. 

Other  accessories  are  visible  in  the  1888  photograph  (Illustration 
34).  A  "library  calendar"  is  listed  on  the  1914  inventory,  and  is 
seen  above  the  chair  rail,  decorated  with  a  ribbon.     Two  elaborate 


169 


UNA'S  ROOM 

pillow  shams  are  hung  from  a  rod  on  the  bed.  There  is  no  additional 

record  of  these.  The  brass  and  wood  curtain  rods  in  this  picture 

54 
belonged  to  HML. 

UPPER  FRONT  HALL 

Paintings,  Prints 

"PILGRIMS  SIGNING  THE  COMPACT,"  NPS  #2087;  MML  "Picture  #40."  Eng- 
graving  made  in  1914.  Listed  on  the  1915  inventory  as  "Large 
engraving  of  the  Mayflower."  Hanging  from  ceiling  cove  mold- 
ing, at  the  top  of  the  main  stairs. 

CERTIFICATE,  NPS  #2237;  MML  #157.  DL's  membership  in  the  Bostonian 
Society.  Listed  on  the  1914  and  1915  inventories.  The  news- 
papers used  in  framing  date  to  October,  1889.  Hanging  from 
the  ceiling  cove  molding  over  the  northeast  passage  doorway. 

"WATERCOLOR  OF  THE  HOUSE,"  NPS  #2201.  By  Mrs.  Isaac  (A.J.)  Fenno, 
dated  1891.  The  "Fennos  were  close  friend  of  the  Lothrops. 
He  was  one  of  the  leading  men's  clothing  manufacturers  in 
Boston."  They  lived  in  Roxbury  and  there  was  much  visiting 


54.  Carrol  1 /MML  interview,  August  15,  1966,  typescript,  MMNHP 
files,  n.p. 


170 


UPPER  FRONT  HALL 

and  writing  back  and  forth. 55  Hanging  from  the  ceiling 
cove  molding  over  the  Hawthorne  bedroom  doorway. 

PRINT,  NPS  #2445;  MML  "Pictures,  #139."  "Milton  in  his  blindness." 
Engraving,  by  Edmund  Garrett  for  one  of  DL's  magazines.  In- 
ventoried in  1914. 

"2  PRINTED  CARDBOARDS  (HAWTHORNE'S  AND  UNA'S  ROOM)."  Inventoried  in 
1915.  The  original  signs  are  now  missing.  They  were  probably 
attached  to  the  doorways  of  the  rooms. 

Furniture 

CHAIR,   NPS  2202;   MML   "Chair  #12."     MML  notes   that   this   chair   belonged 
to  Ephraim  Wales   Bull,    hybridizer  of   the  Concord   grape,    from 
whom  HML  purchased   it.     MML  recalled  Mr.    Bull    seated    in   the 
chair   in   front   of   his   house.     She  placed   the  chair    in   the   up- 
per  front   hall.     Mr.    Bull's   name   is   carved   into  the  crest   rail 
of  this  Windsor  chair. 

Clocks 

CLOCK.   Illustration  36,  made  about  1888,  shows  an  office  clock  above 

the  doorway  in  the  Hawthorne  bedroom.  The  clock  is  marked  "D. 

Lothrop  Co."  Its  present  whereabouts  are  unknown. 


55.  Ronsheim,  "Historic  Furnishings,"  p.  123, 


171 


UPPER  FRONT  HALL 

Floor  Covering 

Same  green  carpeting  described  above  under  "Lower  Front  Hall." 

Lighting  Devices 

HANGING  LANTERN.  Electrified,  at  the  top  of  the  main  stairs.  This 
was  installed  around  1906  when  the  house  was  electrified. 
MML  stated  that  lighting  was  designed  by  the  Boston  firm 
of  Bigelow  and  Jordan  (see  above,  "Lower  Front  Hall"). 

WEST  CHAMBER  OR  HAWTHORNE  BEDROOM 

Furniture 

CHEST,  NPS  #2111;  MML  "Beds  and  Chests  #17."     Probably  the  "mahog- 
any colonial   bureau  and  a  mahogany  colonial   mirror  and 
stand"  listed  in  1914.     It  does  consist  of  two  pieces:  a 
four-drawer  swell -front  Federal    bureau  and  a  small    stand 
which  sits  on   it.     The  stand  has  a  mirror. 

ROCKING  CHAIR,   NPS   #2096.     A  carved-back-and-seat  rockinq  chair  is 
presently  in  the  room.      In  1915,  a   "white  wicker  rockinq 
chair"  was   listed  on  the  inventory.     That  chair's  where- 
abouts  is   unknown.     MML  later  believed  that  her  mother  put 

56 
it  in  Grapevine  Cottage. 


56.     Ibid.,  p.   87 


172 


WEST  CHAMBER  OR  HAWTHORNE  BEDROOM 

DESK,  NPS  #2097;  MML  "Desks  #2."  MML  notes  that  "this  desk  was  in 
the  Concord  jail."  Circumstances  of  its  acquisition  are  un- 
known. 

SHAVING  TABLE,  NPS  #2109;  MML  "Bureaus  and  Chests  #6."  MML  believed 

that  her  mother  purchased  this  from  Rose  Lathrop.  This  may 

be  true.  The  Concord  Antiquarian  Society  owns  a  matching 

chest  of  drawers  (#F-924).  A  Mrs.  Kelly  gave  the  piece  to 

the  Society  in  the  early  1950s  and  indicated  that  she  had 

purchased  it  at  a  "Hawthorne  sale."  No  documentation  about 

this  sale  remains.  A  similar  chest  of  drawers,  photographed 

in  a  Salem  house  in  the  late  nineteenth  century,  is  pictured 

in  Newton  W.  Elwell,  Colonial  Furniture  and  Interiors  (Boston: 

George  H.  Polley  &  Co.,  1896).  The  shaving  table  is  probably 

a  Salem  piece  and  certainly  dates  to  the  early  nineteenth 

57 
century.  It  definitely  could  have  belonged  to  the  Hawthornes. 

HIGH  CHEST,  NPS  #1808;  MML  "Bureaus  and  Chests  #15."  Documentation 
on  this  chest  is  missing.  It  is  a  Queen  Anne  hi qh  chest  dat- 
ing from  the  early  eighteenth  century.  MML  gave  it  to  the 
park  in  1965. 


57.  The  Elwell  book  is  located  in  the  Rare  Books  -  Fine  Arts  Depart- 
ment of  the  Boston  Public  Library.  I  was  unable  to  take  a  copy  photo 
of  the  Salem  Bureau. 


173 


WEST  CHAMBER  OR  HAWTHORNE  BEDROOM 

"WHITE  BEDSTEAD  IRON  WITH  BRASS  TRIMMINGS."  This  bed  is  in  the 
maid's  room  now.  MML  purchased  a  sleigh  bed  in  Califor- 
nia in  1934  and  it  is  in  this  room  now  (NPS  #2115). 

Lighting  Devices 

BRASS  CANDLESTICKS,  NPS  #1763,  NPS  #1764;  MML  "Candleholders  #11 

and  #12."  Belonged  to  HML.  A  pair  of  brass  candlesticks 

was  listed  on  the  1915  inventory. 

"RED  CANDLESTICK  WITH  GLASS  SHADE."  This  was  listed  in  1914.  Miss 

Lothrop  had  no  recollection  of  it.  It  is  not  at  the  Dark 

58 
now. 

CANDLESTICKS,  NPS  #2123,  NPS  #2124;  MML  "Candleholders  #7."  Tin 

candlesticks,  painted  green,  with  clear  glass  globes.  These 
belonged  to  the  Lothrops.  There  is  no  record  of  their  place- 
ment in  this  room. 

Fireplace  Equipment 

FIREPLACE  FENDER,  NPS  #2105;  MML  #8.  A  "brass  topped  fender"  is 
listed  in  the  1914  and  1915  inventories. 


58.  Ronsheim,  "Historic  Furnishings,"  p.  81 


174 


WEST  CHAMBER  OR  HAWTHORNE  BEDROOM 

ANDIRONS,  NPS  #2105,  NPS  #2106.  Brass  andirons  are  listed  in  the 

1914  and  1915  inventories.  MML  remembers  these  from  her 

childhood. 
FIREPLACE  SHOVEL,  NPS  #1792.  Purchased  by  HML;  MML  not  certain  of 

date  or  source. 

FIREPLACE  TONGS,  NPS  #1791  Now  in  the  room;  date  and  place  of 

POKER,  NPS  #9463 

BRASS  STAND,  NPS  #1790    purchase  unknown.  This  poker,  the 

tonqs,  and  the  brass  stand  approximate 

the  "brass  stands  with  brass  tongs  & 

brass  poker"  listed  on  the  1914  and 

1915  inventories.  A  "little  hearth 

brush"  was  also  1 isted. 

Mirrors 

MIRROR,  NPS  #2686.  A  "plate  glass  mirror  in  black  walnut  frame"  was 
listed  in  1915. 

SHAVING  MIRROR,  NPS  #2106.  Visible  in  Illustration  37.  Listed  in 
the  early  inventories  on  the  bureau. 

Ceramics 


VASES,  NPS  #1634,  NPS  #1635.  Hand  painted  by  a  friend  of  HML  who 

received  them  for  a  wedding  present  in  1881.  They  are  copies 
of  Frankenthal  porcelain,  according  to  cataloger  Cordelia  Snow, 


175 


WEST  CHAMBER  OR  HAWTHORNE  BEDROOM 

PORTIERE,  NPS  #8457.  A  "Chintz  curtain  for  closet"  was  listed  on 

the  1914  and  1915  inventories.  NPS  #8457  is  old,  but  not 

59 
the  same  one  listed  on  the  inventories. 

PILLOW  SLIPS,  NPS  #s  8391,  8395,  8398.  White  muslin  embroidered 
with  DL's  initials. 

BRAIDED  RUG,  NPS  #8072.  No  history  on  this  piece.  Given  to  MMNHP 
by  MML. 

MATTRESS,  NPS  #2116.  For  the  bed.  Probably  not  the  same  mattress 
listed  on  the  1915  inventory.  This  fits  the  larqer,  sleiqh 
bed  in  the  room.  It  belonged  to  MML. 

"3  PAIRS  CHINTZ  CURTAINS."  Listed  on  the  early  inventories.  MML 

recalls  seeing  two  pairs  of  curtains  with  deep  valances. 

60 
She  may  have  considered  the  valances  a  pair  of  curtains. 

"CHINTZ  CUSHION  TO  MATCH  FOR  OTTOMAN."  In  1914,  this  was  merely 
described  as  a  cushion.  There  is  no  other  information  on 
it.  The  ottoman  is  missing. 

"PIECE  OF  CHINTZ  (FOR  TOILET  TABLE)  TO  MATCH."  This  is  missing, 
but  the  chintz  decoration  reveals  HML's  taste. 


59.  Ibid.,  pp.  82-83 

60.  Ibid.,  p.  82. 


176 


WEST  CHAMBER  OR  HAWTHORNE  BEDROOM 

Prints,  Paintings 

PRINT,  NPS  #2221.  "Girls  on  Hill."  Unsigned  chromolithograph  MML 
associated  with  her  father's  office.  She  remembered  seeing 
it  in  the  house  when  she  was  young.  Listed  in  this  room  on 
the  early  inventories. 

PRINT,  NPS  #2256.  "Captive  Andromache."  Steel  engraving  by  C. 

Roberts,  Jr.  Inventoried  in  this  room  in  1915.  Miss  Lothrop 
wrote  that  it  has  been  in  the  house  for  many  years,  and 
thought  that  it  might  have  been  connected  with  the  Lothrop 
Publishing  Company. 

PRINT,  NPS  #2231.  "A  Morning  in  the  Tropics."  Engraving  by  S.R. 

Hunt,  after  the  painting  by  F.E.  Church.  Listed  on  the  early 
inventories  of  this  room. 

"3  PHOTOS  IN  ONE  FRAME:"  "Descent  from  Cross,  Assumption,  etc." 

This  was  also  listed  in  1914.  The  item  is  missing.   It  does 
not  appear  in  any  photograph. 

PRINT,  NPS  #2213.  "Erasmus"  after  Holbein's  portrait.  This  belonged 
to  the  Lothrops ;  there  is  no  historical  documentation  for  its 
location  in  this  room. 

PHOTO.  "Communion  of  St.  Jerome."  This  was  listed  on  the  early  in- 
ventories, but  there  is  no  description,  and  the  park  does  not 
own  it. 

177 


RECOMMENDED  FURNISHINGS 
Introduction 


The  following  is  a   list  of  recommended  furnishings   for  the  Wayside. 
The  list  is  arranged  room-by-room,  alphabetically,   first  and  then 
second  floors.     Many  of  the  recommended  items  are  already  part  of 
the  park's  collection  and  are  exhibited  in  their  historical    loca- 
tions.    Where  this   is  the  case,  justifications  for  their  inclusion 
are  found  in  the  previous  section,   "Evidence  of  Original    Furnishings. 
Items  recommended  for  acquisition  are  also  documented  in  the  previous 
section. 

A  word  is  necessary  here  about  the  Lothrops '   furnishings  and  sources 
for  new  acquisitions.     The  Wayside  was  obviously  furnished  as  a  sum- 
mer home.     Very  few  of  the  items   in  it  were  high  style.     Most  of  the 
art  is  what  we  would  term  "souvenir  art"   today.     That  is,  the  ob- 
jects were  purchased  by  HML  on  her  many  trips  abroad  and  displayed 
in  the  home  for  their  sentimental   or  evocative  value.     Replacements 
for  these  objects  are  not  found  in  fine  antique  stores.     Thrift 
shops,   flea  markets,  and  second-hand  stores  are  the  most  likely 
source  for  the  ephemera  that  once  decorated  the  Wayside.     In  recre- 
ating the  historic  scene,  one  must  avoid  rendering  the  Wayside  finer 
than  it  was.     The  Lothrops  clearly  valued  an  intellectual   above  a 
material    plane  of  life.     This   is  what  the  house  should  convey  to 
the  visitor. 


178 


All  drawings  were  originally  done  by  Orville  W.  Carroll  in  1967. 
Except  where  they  were  modified  to  reflect  new  information,  this 
author  has  traced  Carroll 's  drawings  for  this   report. 

Before  concluding  this   introduction,  the  photographic  documents 
of  the  Wayside  pictorially  should  be  mentioned.     The  large  number 
of  documentary  photographs   is   unusual   and  a  blessing  to  historians, 
but  they  must  be  used  with  caution.     First,   it  is  obvious  that  the 
photographer,  the  owner,  or  both,  manipulated  the  scenes.     That 
is,   they  moved  objects  about  for  the  sake  of  pictorial   composition. 
We  may  see  the  same  chair  in  one  room,  and  again  in  another.     I  be- 
lieve that  this  was  done  in  some  cases  to  assure  that  certain  items 
would  be  within  the  camera's  line  of  vision;   in  other  cases,  to 
maximize  the  Wayside's  furnishings. 

We  cannot  document  much  of  the  furnishings  and  accessories  to  spe- 
cific rooms.     In  addition  to  the  manipulated  photographs,  HML  oc- 
cupied the  house  for  more  than  thirty  years  and  during  those  years, 
furnishings  were  moved  within  a  room  and  from  room  to  room.     The 
photographs  do  tell    us  what  objects  the  Lothrops  considered  appro- 
priate for  various  types  of  rooms.     For  example,  architectural 
photographs  were  placed  in  public  rooms.     The  photographs  also 
indicate  a  state  of  "clutter"   in  the  Victorian  sense. 


179 


BAY  WINDOW   ROOM 


Jorth  Wall 


NPS  CAT.   NO. 

2312  PHOTOGRAPH.      "Madonna  di    Foligno." 

2286  PHOTOGRAPH.      "Fondheim  Cathedral ." 

2034  MARBLE-TOPPED  TABLE.     Place   in  front  of  radiator.     Table 

should  be  covered  with  a  floor-length  piece  of  repro- 
duced portiere  fabric  (as   in  Illustration  4)   and  flowers 
(in  season)   placed  on   it. 

2563  BRASS  AND  COPPER  PITCHER  FOR  FLOWERS.     To  preserve  the 

pitcher,  dried  flowers  should  be  substituted  for  sea- 
sonal, garden  flowers. 

East  Wall 


NPS   CAT.   NO. 

2242        PHOTOGRAPH.  "Sistine  Chapel . " 

ELECTRIFIED  WALL  SCONCE.  Original. 
2018        SECRETARY. 

South  Wall 


NPS  CAT.  NO 


REPRODUCTION  WINDOW  SHADES  (3). 

10408-      CURTAINS.  Reproductions  after  originals  in  Illustra- 
10410       tion  4. 

REPRODUCTION  WOODEN  BRACKETS  (2).  Install  between 
windows  in  the  bay. 

TWO  HANGING  PLANTS.  Hang  one  from  each  bracket  as  HML 
did.  Boston  ferns  would  do  well.  Bracket  marks  are 
visible  on  the  upper  right  section  of  window  molding 
in  Illustration  4. 


180 


BAY  WINDOW   ROOM 
West  Wall 
NPS   CAT.    NO. 


TELEPHONE.  Period  substitute  for  original  crank  phone 
that  was  mounted  on  the  wall  (Illustration  3).  Source 
Phone  Center  Store.     Cost:      $45. 


PHOTOS  AND  LABEL  COPY.  The  1937  photo  of  this  room 
shows  photos  and  label  copy  thumbtacked  to  the  west 
wall    above   the   bookcase.      This    includes: 


Nathaniel   Hawthorne   as   a  young  man.     Beneath   it   is   a 
small    typescript   sign   that   reads   "EXTRA  COPIES/FOR/SALE/ 
FIVE   CENTS."     To   the   right   are  copies   of   the  Matthew 
Brady  portrait   of  Hawthorne   and   one  other   portrait   taken 
when   he  was   an   older  man    (undoubtedly,    post-1860).      Label 
copy  to  the   right   identifies   the  portraits.      Below  them 
is   a  framed   engraving  of   Everet  Duycknick,    Hawthorne's 
early  publisher   in  The  Literary  World.      To   the   right 
(not   visible   in   the   photograph),    label    copy  indicates 
there   is   a  photostat   copy  of  a   letter  from  Hawthorne  to 
Duycknick,   written   from  the  Wayside.     Lists   of   books 
written  by  Margaret  Sidney  for   sale   at   the  Wayside   are 
thumbtacked   to   the  edges   of   the   first   and   second   shelves 
of   the  bookcase.      Prices   for   the  books   are   also   listed. 


2032  BOOKCASE.     See  MML's   notes 


DRINKING  GLASS.     As   a  final    touch,    a  glass   containing 
lilies   of  the   valley  (in   season)   might   be   added. 


Center  of  Room 


NPS  CAT. 


SMALL   BRAIDED  RUG.     An   approximation  of  the   rug   seen    in 
the  1922  photograph.     Because  of   visitor  traffic,    an   in- 
expensive,  easily-replaced   reproduction   is   recommended. 
See  Sears'    rugs.     Cost:     About  $60. 


181 


BAY  WINDOW   ROOM 

The  Bay  Window  Room  can   be   arranged   to   show  how  the  Lothrops   lived   and 

how  MML   interpreted  the  Wayside  to  visitors   after  HML's   death.     This 

is   very  much   a  part  of  the   house's   story. 

Estimated  Cost,   Bay  Window  Room:  $105. 

DINING  ROOM 

The  Lothrops   ate   their  meals   in   this   room.      Not   only  family  members, 
but  guests  were  present.      A  maid   served   the  meals   and,    after  Mr. 
Lothrop's  death,   Mrs.    Lothrop   sat   at  the   head   of   the  table. 

Mrs.    Lothrop  believed   that  Nathaniel   Hawthorne   also   used   this   room 
as   his   dining   room.      This   notion  was  wrong   (see  p.   56  for  documenta- 
tion).    Because  we   are   interpreting   the  Lothrop  occupancy,    however, 
the   room  should   include  furnishings   that    indicate  Mrs.    Lothrop's 
views,   even  when  those  views  were   later  proven  wrong. 

It    is   obvious   from  surviving   photographs   that   there  was   no   single 
arrangement  of   objects   displayed   on   furniture   in   the  dining   room 
during   the  Lothrop  occupancy.     What   is    listed   here   is   a  suggested 
arrangement  which   can   be  varied  with   objects   in   the   closet   from  time 
to   time. 

North  Wall 


NPS   CAT.    NO. 


SIGN.     Replication  of  one   in  the   home   in  1922   (Illustra- 
tion 8)   that   reads,   "This  was   Hawthorne's  Dining  Room 


182 


DINING  ROOM 
NPS  CAT.  NO. 


until  Julian  was  at  Harvard  College  when  it  was  given 
to  him.  Hawthorne  speaks  of  it  as  the  'room  where  the 
sunshine  lingers  lovinaly  the  best  part  of  a  winter 
day'."  The  curator  can  make  this  sign  for  about  50<t. 
It  should  be  tacked  to  the  wall  as  in  the  illustration 
and  replaced  when  it  shows  signs  of  wear. 


1639        CREAMWARE  PLATTER.  Affixed  to  the  wall,  below  sign, 
with  plate  hooks. 


ELECTRIFIED  WALL  SCONCE.  Original  to  room. 


1640       CREAMWARE,  "SAXON  CHINA,"  PLATE.  Hung  on  wall  with 

picture  wire  from  picture  molding  as  in  Illustration  8, 


1638       CREAMWARE  "SAXON  CHINA"  SOUP  PLATE.  Hanging  on  wall 
from  plate  hooks . 


1646        FAIENCE  PLATE.  With  St.  Malo.  Hanging  on  wall  from  a 
visible  hook  with  picture  wire  as  in  Illustration  8. 


2001        TABLE  AND  CLOTH.  MML  believed  that  her  mother  would 

have  kept  a  cloth  over  table  #2001  to  cover  its  marred 
surface.  If  the  park  collection  does  not  have  a  suit- 
able tablecloth  or  runner,  purchase  a  plain  white  linen 
cloth  large  enough  to  cover  the  table  when  it  is  folded, 
Cost:  $20.  Source:  Linens  section  of  any  large  de- 
partment store. 


1830       BREAD  AND  CHEESE  TRAY.  On  top  of  covered  table 


2009        DESK  AND  BOOKCASE,  UPPER  PORTION.  Used  as  a  sideboard, 
Set  diagonally  in  northeast  corner. 


1635       DELFT  PLATTER.  On  top  of  sideboard, 


183 


DINING  ROOM 

NPS  CAT.  NO. 

1603         CHINESE  EXPORT  PLATE.  With  "HNM"  monogram  (of  HML's 

relatives,  Henry  and  Nancy  Mulford),  c.  1830,  on  top  of 
sideboard. 


East  Wall 


NPS  CAT.  NO, 


2054        CHROMOLITHOGRAPH.  Framed,  hanging  from  the  picture 
molding  in  the  nineteenth-century  manner. 

ELECTRIFIED  WALL  SCONCE.  Part  of  set  in  room. 

1663        PLATE.  Austrian,  hanging  on  wall  from  plate  hooks. 

2556        CHROMOLITHOGRAPH.  "Asking  A  Blessing,"  framed  hanging 
as  #2054. 

2006        TABLE.  Set  diagonally  in  southeast  corner.  Cut  flow- 
ers from  the  Wayside's  gardens  can  be  placed  on  top  of 
this  table  when  in  season.  Place  flowers  in  a  small, 
reproduction  soft  paste  vase. 

South  Wall 


NPS  CAT.  NO. 

1737  "CAMBRIDGE  COAT  OF  ARMS."  Hanging  on  wall. 

1738  "OXFORD  COAT  OF  ARMS."  Hanging  on  wall  directly  below 
#1737. 

ELECTRIFIED  WALL  SCONCE.  Original  to  room. 

174/        PEWTER  PLATE.  Hanging  below  the  wall  sconce. 


184 


DINING  ROOM 

Windows 

NPS  CAT.    NO. 

10384-5  CURTAINS.     Two  pairs,   white  gauze.     Given   to   the   park 

by  MML.      SHADES.     Red,    on   each  window.     These   are   pres- 
ently in   place.     Window  hangings  will    fade   and   sun   rot 
in   time.      Those   presented   to   the   park   by  MML  should   be 
used   as   records   for   securing   replacements. 


West  Wall 


NPS  CAT. 


ELECTRIFIED  WALL  SCONCES.  Original  to  room. 

2225        PRINT.  "Philon,"  hanging  below  sconce. 

CLOSET.  Containing  ceramics.  See  pp.  71-74  for  com- 
plete list  of  ceramics  and  glassware  in  closet. 

PORTIERE.  Suspended  from  brass  rod  across  the  cup- 
board. Reproduction  in  park's  collection  after  Art 
Nouveau  hanging. 

Over  Mantel 


NPS  CAT.  NO. 

PINE  BOUGHS.  For  special  occasions  pine  boughs  should 
be  placed  here.  HML  saw  pine  boughs  as  important  to 
historic  interpretation  of  the  house  (see  Illustration 
9). 

2787        STONE  RUBBING.  Framed,  hung  from  picture  molding.  May 
alternate  with  pine  boughs  (see  Illustration  23). 


On  Mantel 

NPS  CAT.  NO. 

1771-2       CANDLESTICKS, 


185 


DINING  ROOM 

NPS  CAT.  NO. 

8239-40      BOBECHE.  Pair  on  either  end  of  mantel. 

2451        MUG.  With  Lord  Baden  Powell's  portrait  on  it. 

HORSESHOE.  Nailed  to  mantel  as  MML  remembered  it. 

Fireplace  Equipment 

NPS  CAT.  NO. 

1793        BRASS  STAND.  To  hold  equipment. 

1801         SHOVEL. 

1810         FENDER. 

1805-6       ANDIRONS.  Pair. 

WOOD.  In  fireplace.  The  Lothrops  used  their  fire- 
places. Wood  should  be  kept  in  them  to  demonstrate 
this.  The  park  can  supply  its  own  wood  at  no  cost. 

2356        MANUSCRIPT  of  America.  Framed.  Hang  from  picture 
molding  N.B.  This  and  all  of  the  works  on  paper  in 
house  should  be  reframed  with  archival  mat  boards  and 
UF-2  plexiglas  to  preserve  the  objects.  (See  Caroline 
Keek's  Curatorial  Care  of  Works  of  Art  on  Paper  for 
arc hi  val  matting  and  framing  instructions.) 

8429         SIDE  CHAIR. 

Center  of  Room 

NPS  CAT.  NO. 

2007         DINING  TABLE.  Leaf  set  in. 

1671         FLOWER  POT  or  FERN  DISH. 

1736        TIN  CONTAINER.   In  center  of  table.  (Alternate  between 
pine  boughs  and  cut  flowers  as  a  centerpiece.) 


186 


DINING  ROOM 
NPS  CAT.  NO. 

2002  SIDE  CHAIR. 

2003  SIDE  CHAIR. 

2051        DESK  CHAIR.  At  head  of  table. 

RUG.  Below  table.  Photos  indicate  that  the  Lothrops 
changed  their  rugs  in  the  dining  room.  The  present  area 
rug  was  donated  by  MML  and  is  suitable. 

Estimated  Cost,  Dining  Room:  $20. 

KITCHEN 

The  Lothrops  used  this  room  for  food  storage  and  preparation,  and  as  a 

laundry,  for  which  tasks  help  was  employed.  This  room  should  reflect 

those  activities.  The  kitchen  is  primarily  an  indication  of  the  hired 

help. 

Lighting 

NPS  CAT.  NO. 

ELECTRIC  LIGHTS.  Placed  in  this  room  by  HML.  The  bare 
bulbs  should  remain  exactly  as  they  are  (see  p.  78). 

Floor  Covering 

The  present  floor  covering  is  an  appropriate  reproduction  of  the 

original  linoleum. 

North  Wall 


NPS  CAT.  NO. 


10375       WINDOW  CURTAIN.  Adapted  after  "2  pairs  Khaki  Window 
curtains"  listed  by  HML. 


187 


KITCHEN 
NPS  CAT. 


10350 
10350 

8421 


WINDOW  SHADE.  Left  in  the  Wayside  by  MML. 

TOWEL  BAR.  Wooden.  Original  to  the  house. 

TOWEL  HOLDER  AND  ROLLER.  Wooden. 

DISH  CLOTH.  Reproduction. 

DISH  CLOTH.  Reproduction. 

HAND  TOWEL.  On  roller,  presented  by  MML.  When  a 
replacement  is  needed,  toweling  is  available  at  most 
large  department  stores.  All  cotton  or  linen  is 
preferable  to  blends. 


East  Wall 

A  sink   and    laundry  tub  with   drain   board   top   are   built   into   this   wall. 

NPS  CAT.    NO. 

WINDOW  SHADE.  Presented  to  the  Wayside  by  MML. 
8562        DISH  PAN.  Enamel. 


2715 

DISH  RACK. 

Wire. 

1643 

BOWL. 

1644 

PLATE. 

1652 

BOWL. 

2465 

PLATE. 

DISH  MOP. 

See  Sears 

See  Sears,  1902,  p.  572  for  example.  These 
are  small  "mops"  on  a  short  wooden  handle  for  cleaning 
dishes.  They  are  still  available  in  five  and  ten  cent 
stores  for  under  $2. 

SINK  SCRAPERS.  Two.  Flat  wooden  sticks  for  cleaning 

sinks.  Reproductions  could  be  made;  or,  a  birch 

stirring  paddle  (available  in  housewares  departments  of 
department  stores)  could  be  substituted. 


188 


KITCHEN 

NPS  CAT.  NO. 


2441 


WINDOW  SHADE.  Presented  to  the  Wayside  by  MML. 
WINDOW  CURTAIN.  Adaptation  after  description  of  HML 
ROCKING  CHAIR. 


On  Built-in  Wall  Shelf 

NPS  CAT.  NO. 

10391        GLASS  JAR. 

8163         CERAMIC  PITCHER. 

2199         TIN  TRAY.  Black. 

On  Floor  Beneath  Shelf 
NPS  CAT.  NO. 


2743 


CLOTHES  BOILER. 

ICE  CREAM  FREEZER.  See  Sears,  1902  catalog  for  two 
models.  These  can  be  located  in  antique  shops  or 
second-hand  shops.  Their  approximate  cost  varies;  but 
expect  to  pay  about  $75.  for  one  in  good,  although  not 
necessarily  usable,  condition. 


South  Wall— On  Built-in  Wall  Shelf 


NPS  CAT. 

NO. 

8157 

CROCK. 

1730 

TIN  TRAY.  Black. 

2769 

CERAMIC  PITCHER. 

10345 

SIGN.  "Ice  and  Oil.1 

10346 

ICEBOX. 

189 


KITCHEN 

NPS   CAT.    NO. 


STONEWARE   JUGS   (PITCHERS).     Three.     For  molasses   and 
vinegar  —  early  twentieth-century  stoneware   is   available 
in   second-hand   stores.      Expect   to   pay  about  $15.    each. 
Cover   the  mouths  of   the  jugs  with   oiled   paper   and 
string. 


In  Corner 
NPS  CAT.    I 
10372 


BROOM. 

DUST   PAN.     See  Sears  catalog,    p.   591  for   example.     These 
are  sometimes   available  in   second-hand   stores,   or  at 
garage   sales.     Price—About  $3. 


West  Wall 

NPS  CAT. 

NO. 

2547 

CHAIR. 

2698 

TABLE. 

10354 

TABLECLOTH.  Red  and  white  check. 

8720 

COOKBOOK. 

2598 

PEPPER  SHAKER. 

2425 

SALT  SHAKER. 

9540 

BOWL. 

10349 

GLASS  JAR.  Containing  dried  peas 

2508 

SPOON. 

8324 

DISH  CLOTH. 

2120 

CHAIR.  Small,  red  wooden. 

190 


KITCHEN 

NPS  CAT.  NO. 

2012 

CHAIR.  Small,  rush-seated. 

COAL  STOVE.  Built  into  house 

1800 

POKER. 

1996 

SKILLET. 

1836 

FLATIRON. 

1834 

FLATIRON. 

1835 

FLATIRON. 

9458 

KETTLE. 

9446 

COAL  SHOVEL. 

2542 

COAL  SCUTTLE. 

10352 

POPCORN  POPPER. 

10353 

POPCORN  POPPER. 

Pantry 

The  following  items  should  be  placed  on  the  shelves  of  the  pantry, 

hung  on  its  walls,  and  stacked  or  rested  on  the  floor.  The  placement 

of  the  items  should  be  neat,  but  should  convey  the  feeling  that  the 

house  and  kitchen  are  occupied. 

NPS  CAT.  NO. 

10364        CARDBOARD  BOX. 

10363        GLASS  CUP. 

1642         TEAPOT. 

1655         SUGAR  BOWL  AND  LID. 

10362        GLASS  WITH  WAX. 


191 


KITCHEN 

NPS  CAT.  NO. 

1982 

BREADBASKET. 

1739 

BLANC  MANGE  MOLD 

2406 

BREAD  BOX. 

9456 

POT  LID. 

2140 

BASKET. 

9451 

FUNNEL. 

2200 

TRAY. 

1731 

TRAY. 

10380 

YARD  STICK. 

10355 

BALL  OF  RED  WAX. 

8187 

FLOOR  BRUSH. 

8188 

FLOOR  BRUSH. 

2710 

SCRUB  BOARD. 

2746 

WRINGER. 

10371 

TOASTING  RACK. 

10370 

TOASTING  RACK. 

2739 

BUCKET  AND  COVER 

1997 

IRON  POT. 

103678 

BASIN.  Enamel. 

10376 

BOX.  Wood. 

9448 

BREAD  BOARD. 

10367 

BUCKET. 

Wooden 


192 


KITCHEN 

NPS  CAT.  NO. 

10379 

CORD.  With  plug 

8008 

KNIFE. 

8007 

KNIFE. 

8011 

KNIFE. 

8010 

KNIFE. 

8015 

KNIFE. 

2189 

TEASPOON. 

2185 

TEASPOON. 

2187 

TEASPOON. 

8047 

TEASPOON. 

2188 

TEASPOON. 

8051 

TEASPOON. 

8050 

TEASPOON. 

8048 

TEASPOON. 

8049 

TEASPOON. 

2183 

SOUP  SPOON. 

8045 

SPOON. 

9453 

KETTLE. 

9457 

FRYING  PAN. 

2407 

GRINDER. 

2734 

IRON. 

1837 

IRON  REST. 

193 


KITCHEN 

NPS  CAT.  NO. 

2622 

MUSTARD  JAR. 

1995 

RUG  BEATER. 

8238 

VEGETABLE  GRATER. 

1667 

SUGAR  BOWL. 

2403 

POTATO  MASHER. 

8156 

CROCK.  With  cover. 

10373 

LIGHT  BULB. 

10374 

LIGHT  BULB. 

8183 

TIN  BOX. 

10356 

BOKA  COFFEE  CAN. 

10357 

BEECHNUT  COFFEE  CAN. 

10358 

BEECHNUT  COFFEE  CAN. 

2618 

MARMALADE  JAR. 

10359 

GLASS  JAR. 

10360 

CUP. 

1687 

CELERY  DISH. 

1651 

COFFEE  CUP. 

1653 

SAUCER. 

8122 

WILLOWWARE  CUP. 

8191 

WILLOWWARE  SAUCER. 

8195 

WILLOWWARE  SAUCER. 

8125 

WILLOWWARE  CUP. 

194 


KITCHEN 

NPS  CAT.  NO. 

8193         WILLOWWARE  SAUCER. 

8166         WILLOWWARE  PLATTER. 

8138         WILLOWWARE  SAUCER. 

8128        WILLOWWARE  CUP. 

8185         WILLOWWARE  BOWL. 

8130        WILLOWWARE  PLATTER.  Large. 

2399         KNIFE. 

8014         KNIFE. 

8006         KNIFE. 

LEMON  SQUEEZER.  See  Sears  catalog  for  prototype. 

ROASTING  PAN.  Large,  as  in  Sears,  p.  583. 

SAUCE  PAN. 

CAKE  TINS. 

BUTTER  CROCK.  Probably  stoneware.  Available  in  local 
second-hand  stores  for  under  $15. 

BREAD  PANS.  Four. 

TUBE  PAN.  One.  Called  "Turk's  head  pan"  in  Sears, 
1902. 

PIE  PLATES.  Two,  large. 

PIE  PLATES.  Three,  small. 

CUSTARD  CUPS.  Two,  large. 

CUSTARD  CUPS.  Two,  medium. 

CUSTARD  CUP.  One,  small. 


195 


KITCHEN 

NPS  CAT.  NO. 

CUSTARD  CUPS.  Six,  small.  Should  not  match  the  one 
small  custard  cup  above. 

ASH  BARRELS.  Three,  zinc. 

All  of  the  above  items  are  still  available  in  second-hand  stores, 

priced  under  $5.  per  item. 

Estimated  Cost,  Kitchen:  $300. 

LOWER  FRONT  HALL 

This  room  is  where  the  visitor  to  the  Wayside  should  be  welcomed, 
just  as  the  Lothrops1  visitors  entered  the  house  here.  Older  furni 
ture  and  souvenirs  from  the  Lothrops1  travels,  as  well  as  framed 
testaments  which  establish  the  owners'  identities,  are  found  here. 

North  Wall 


NPS  CAT 


WINDOW.  With  interior  shutters  painted  red.  See  in- 
terview with  OWC  and  MML,  transcription,  p.  11,  MMNHP 
files. 


East  Wall 
NPS  CAT. 


CLOTHES  POLE.  Listed  as  "light  wood"  in  the  1915 
inventory.  This  was  probably  a  simple  oak  clothes  tree 
with  canted  legs  and  metal  brackets.  Possibly,  it  came 
from  DL's  business,  like  the  wardrobe.  Source:  Check 
second-hand  furniture  stores.  Cost:  Prices  vary  from 
$15.  to  $75. 


196 


LOWER  FRONT  HALL 

NPS  CAT.  NO. 

8579        WARDROBE.  See  Illustrations  10,  11. 

2543  MARBLE-TOPPED  TABLE.     A  hall    table   is   needed   for  calling 

cards,  mail,   etc.     This  last   quarter,   nineteenth-century 

table   is   suitable.     MML  provided   no   specific   documenta- 
tion on   this   table. 

ELECTRIC   WALL   SCONCES.      Original    to   room. 

2552  BANNER.     Over   sitting   room  door.      "Now  fayre   betyde  whoe 

here   abyde   and   happie  may  theye  be   and   good   befall    whoe 
in  this   halle  render  fayre  courtesie." 

South  Wall 


NPS  CAT. 


West  Wall 


CURTAINS.     Over  door   lights.     Reproductions   of  curtains 

made  by  MML.     Because  of   sun  damage,    these   and  all 

window  hangings   should   be   periodically  checked  and 

replaced   as   needed.      Use   the  original    hangings  in 
MMNHP's   collection   as   patterns. 


2037        CHAIR.  "Savonarola"  style. 

On  Wall 

2294-97      PHOTOGRAPHS.  Four,  in  one  frame. 

Center  of  Hall  and  on  Stairway 

"LARGE   GREEN  RUG."     Put   down   in  1899.     One   presumes   that 
the  rug   in   Illustrations  10  and  11   is   an   approximation 
after  MML's   document,   now  in  MMNHP's   files. 

Estimated  Cost,  Lower  Front  Hall:  $75. 


197 


MRS.    HAWTHORNE'S    PARLOR 

The  Lothrops   used   this   room   as   a  library  during   the   early  years   of 
their  occupancy.     After  Daniel   Lothrop  died,    Harriett  Lothrop   began   to 
convert   the   room   into   a  memorial    to   her   husband.     The   room   assumed   a 
shrine-like   quality   in  HML's  mind   and    it   should   convey  that   ideal    to 
the   visitor  today.     This   room  provides   the   interpretor  with   an   excel- 
lent opportunity  to  discuss  HML's   strong   leanings   toward   the   idealiza- 
tion  of  her   life  through  the  manipulation   of  her   surroundings. 


North 

Wa 

11 

NPS  CAT. 

NO. 

2348 

PHOTOGRAPH 

2275 

PHOTOGRAPH 
#2348. 

2205 

PEDESTAL. 

1784 

LAMP.  On 

Framed,    Edward  Everett   Hale. 

Framed,   Julia  Ward  Howe.      Hangs   below 


WINDOW   SHADES,     Three.     Original    to   room. 


10397 

-99 

NET  CURTAINS.  Pairs,  white.  Br 
backs. 

2600 

VASE.  Ceramic. 

2082 

ARMCHAIR. 

ANTIMACASSAR.  On  back  of  chair. 

1985 

PEDESTAL. 

1984 

BUST  OF  DANIEL  LOTHROP.  Bronze, 

on   pedestal 


198 


MRS.    HAWTHORNE'S   PARLOR 
East  Wall 


NPS  CAT. 

2636-38 

10394-96 

2020 
2063 
2042 


BOOKCASES.  Large,  from  D.  Lothrop  &  Co.  offices. 

CURTAINS.  Rose-colored,  on  interior  of  bookcase  doors, 
Bookcases  are  used  as  a  repository  for  DL  publications, 
The  park  maintains  a  separate  inventory  of  these  books, 

CHAIR.  Gothic. 

SIDE  CHAIR. 

PRINT.  "Entry  Into  Jerusalem,"  framed,  hanging  from 
picture  molding. 


South  Wall 


2043 


"MADONNA  AND  FAMILY."  By  Erich  Currens,  framed,  hang- 
ing from  picture  molding  over  mantel  (see  Illustration 
12). 


On  Mantel 


NPS  CAT, 


1725 
1756 


1581 


LAMBREQUIN.  Striped  with  fringed  edges  and  embroidery 
draped  over  mantel  as  in  Illustration  12.  A  reproduc- 
tion of  the  lambrequin  used  by  HML  could  be  made  for 
about  $125. 

VASE.  Chinese. 

STATUETTE.  Parian  of  neoclassical  figure. 

PHOTOGRAPH.  Mounted  on  board,  of  European  architec- 
ture. Available  in  second-hand  stores  for  about  $5. 
The  photograph  should  lean  against  the  back  wall  as  in 
Illustration  12. 

CLOCK.  Baullier. 


199 


MRS.  HAWTHORNE'S  PARLOR 
NPS  CAT.  NO. 

1724        VASE.  Chinese. 
2062         SIDE  CHAIR. 

West  Wall 

NPS  CAT.  NO. 

2640        PRINT.  "Christ  Led  to  the  Crucifixion,"  framed,  hanging 
from  picture  molding. 

2059  ARMCHAIR. 

2784        PHOTO  OF  S.W.  McCALL.  Autographed,  framed. 

1785        PHOTO  OF  E.  STEDMAN.  Autographed,  framed,  hanging  below 
#2784. 

2060  SIDE  CHAIR. 
2021        CHAIR.  Morris. 

2272        PHOTO  OF  G.  BOUTWELL.  Autographed. 

Center  of  Room 
NPS  CAT.  NO. 

CARPET.  This  was  installed  in  1903  and  is  appropriate. 

LANTERN.  This  is  also  from  HML's  occupancy. 

Estimated  Cost,  Mrs.  Hawthorne's  Parlor:  $130. 

OLD  ROOM 

The  Lothrops  used  this  room  for  leisure  activities.  Informal  par- 
ties were  held  here.  The  room's  atmosphere  should  reflect  a  mood  of 
relaxed  activity. 


200 


OLD  ROOM 

North  Wall 

NPS  CAT.  NO. 

2038        TABLE.  With  checkerboard  on  top. 

2193        CHAIR.  Windsor. 

WINDOW   SHADES.      Original    to   room. 


2064 

OIL  LAMP.  Electrified  on  buil 

2648 

ARMCHAIR.  See  Illustration. 

East 

Wall 

NPS  CAT.  NO. 

CUPBOARD.  Built-in,  contents: 

1611 

PLATE. 

Nankeenware. 

1655 

CUP. 

Nankeenware. 

1670 

INK  STAND. 

2453 

VASE. 

Glass. 

2781 

SAUCER.  Green. 

2780 

SAUCEF 

[.     Green. 

2782 

DISH. 

Green. 

8123 

CUP. 

Nankeenware. 

8124 

CUP. 

Nankeenware. 

8126 

CUP. 

Nankeenware. 

8127 

CUP. 

Nankeenware. 

8129 

CUP. 

Nankeenware. 

201 


OLD  ROOM 
NPS  CAT.  NO. 

8131  BOWL.  Nankeenware. 

8132  SAUCER.  Nankeenware. 

8135  SAUCER.  Nankeenware. 

8136  SAUCER.  Nankeenware. 

8137  SAUCER.  Nankeenware. 

8139  SAUCER.  Nankeenware. 

8140  SAUCER.  Nankeenware. 
8192  SAUCER.  Nankeenware. 
8190  SAUCER.  Nankeenware. 

8196  PLATE.  Nankeenware. 

8197  PLATE.  Nankeenware. 

8198  PLATE.  Nankeenware. 

8199  PLATE.  Nankeenware. 

8186  BOWL.  Vegetable,  Nankeenware 

8200  PLATE.  Nankeenware. 
8213  PLATE.  Nankeenware. 
8235  DISH.  Nankeenware. 
1632  PITCHER.  Lustreware. 

South  Wall 


NPS  CAT.  NO. 

2010         SIDE  CHAIR. 


202 


OLD  ROOM 
NPS  CAT.  NO, 


2030 

Over  Mantel 
NPS  CAT.  NO, 


CABINET.  Norwegian.  Now  in  possession  of  MML's 
cousin,  Mr.  Griffen.  HML  brought  this  cabinet  from  a 
trip  abroad  (see  Illustration  14). 

CHEST.  Wooden,  on  floor,  below  cabinet. 


SIGN.   Ink  on  white  illustration  board,  replicating  the 
one  in  Illustration  17:  "The  Old  Room.  This  is  the 
oldest  part  of  the  house,  being  one  of  the  homes  of  the 
early  settlers  who  built  along  Lexington  Road  under  the 
ridge.  The  crane  was  in  the  house  in  which  the  'town 
meetings'  were  held,  situated  on  the  edge  of  Carlisle 
when  that  town  and  Concord  were  united.  The  kettle  is  a 
Hawthorne  kettle." 


On  Mantel 
NPS  CAT. 
1773 


2151 

1757 
1670 


CANDLESTICKS.  Set,  pewter. 

PORTRAIT.  Of  Hawthorne  with  black  crepe  ribbons.  This 
can  be  made,  in-house,  to  simulate  this  calendar,  or  one 
could  possibly  be  found  in  local  second-hand  shops. 

WATERCOLOR.  James  and  Roxana  Adams,  leaning  against 
chimney. 

BRIC-A-BRAC.  "Sleeping  Child." 

INKSTAND.  Porcelain. 


203 


OLD  ROOM 
Fireplace 


NPS  CAT.  NO. 

1788 

BELLOWS. 

1734 

FOOT  WARMER. 

2125 

TEA  KETTLE. 

2674 

TRAMMEL. 

10317 

POT  HOOK.  Small. 

2575 

POKER. 

2576 

SHOVEL. 

8102 

TONGS. 

1786 

WARMING  PAN. 

8000 

ANDIRON. 

8001 

ANDIRON. 

West  Wall 

NPS  CAT.  NO. 

2048         ROCKING  CHAIR.  Wooden. 

8676         PIANO.  Chickering. 

CALENDAR.  John  Hancock  Insurance  Co.,  c.  1898,  with  the 
Old  State  House  pictured.  Ask  company  if  copy  is  avail- 
able, or  make  a  facsimile. 

PRINT.  Pastoral  scene  comparable  to  the  one  in  Illus- 
tration 17,  framed  and  hanging  from  picture  molding. 
Cost:  $50. 

1783-85      LAMPS.  Astral,  pair,  on  each  end  of  piano. 


204 


OLD   ROOM 

NPS  CAT.    NO. 

9439  MUSIC   RACK. 


PIANO  SHEET  MUSIC.      Old   sheet  music   can   usually  be   pur- 
chased   in   thrift   shops   for   about  $5.50  per   piece.     Try 
to   find   titles   the  Lothrops  might   have  owned    (patriotic 
songs). 


Center  of  Room 

NPS  CAT.  NO. 

2120         CHAIR.  Windsor. 

2066.        TABLE. 

Estimated  Cost,  Old  Room:  $30. 

PIAZZA  ROOM 

This  room  retains  its  appearance  in  1906,  when  the  Lothrops  re- 
moved a  partition  that  divided  the  space  into  two  smaller  rooms.  The 
family  used  it  as  an  informal  sitting  room  or  parlor.  The  room  should 
retain  a  feeling  of  informality. 

All  lighting  fixtures  in  this  room  were  installed  by  HML  and  are 
believed  original. 

Center  of  Room 


NPS  CAT. 


RUG.  Rattan,  on  floor.  A  large  area  rug  would  be 
suitable.  Yellow  matting  was  used  by  HML.  These  are 
available  through  East  Asian  Importers'  outlets  in  major 
cities. 


205 


PIAZZA  ROOM 

NPS  CAT.  NO. 

2752         TABLE. 

2748        COVER.  On  table.  Plain  buff-colored  linen  with  embroi- 
dered border. 

North  Wall 

2241        PHOTOGRAPH.  Framed,  "Acropolis  in  Athens,"  hanging  from 
picture  molding. 

2447        PHOTOGRAPH.  Framed,  "Parthenon"  in  Nashville,  Tennes- 
see, hanging  from  picture  molding. 

WINDOW  SHADE.  Original  to  room. 

10406       WINDOW  CURTAINS.  Gauze.  Presented  to  the  Wayside  by 
MML.  The  ruffled  valance  should  be  removed  and  plain 
--not  ruff led--tiebacks  used.  See  Sears,  1902,  pp. 
879-882. 

East  Wall 


NPS  CAT.  NO. 

2203        PRINT.  Framed,  "Landing  of  Columbus." 

2044         TABLE. 

SIDE   CHAIR.     Mission   style,    as    in  #350,    p.   62,   Stickley 
Craftsmen  Furniture  Catalog   (New  York:      Dover,   1979). 
Low-priced   alternatives   to   labeled   pieces   are   available 
in   second-hand   stores   for   about  $35. 

Over  Mantel 


PRINT.  Framed,  "Three  Women  in  Garden,"  hanging  from 
picture  molding. 


2594         CANDLESTICK. 


206 


PIAZZA  ROOM 

NPS  CAT.  NO. 

2451 

CUP.  Ceramic. 

1680 

PITCHER.  Ceramic 

1689 

CUP.  Lustreware. 

South  Wall 

NPS  CAT.  NO. 

2269 

PHOTOGRAPH.  Fram 

molding. 

2013 

ARMCHAIR. 

2032 

BOOKCASE. 

2180 

PRINT.  "Prince  C 

hanging  from  picture  molding. 

BOOKS.   In  bookcase: 

2702        Two  Little  Friends  in  Norway 

2693        Passing  of  Third  Floor  Back 

2664        Peppers  at  School 

2662        Peppers  and  Friends 

2602        Peppers  Abroad 

2065        A  Little  Maid  from  Boston  Town 

2676        Hester 

2152        Proceedings  of  the  Hawthorne  Centenary 

Reverend  Dr.   Aked;  Woman  Who  Lost;   Mis'   Beauty;   English 
Cousins;   Yawcab  Strauss.     Not   in   park's   collection   but 
available  through  booksellers   at   average  cost   per  book 
$20. 


207 


PIAZZA  ROOM 

West  Wall 

2700        SIDE  CHAIR.  Upholstered  in  black  horsehair. 

2181        WATERCOLOR.  Framed,  "Farm  House,"  hanging  from  picture 
molding. 

2005         SIDE  CHAIR. 

2153        PAINTING.  Framed,  "Whittier  And  The  Children,"  hanging 
from  picture  molding. 

2159        PHOTOGRAPHS.  "Cologne  Cathedral." 

2345        PRINT.  "Tower  of  Pisa." 

DESK.  Mahogany,  on  frame.  For  example,  see  "The  Work 
of  L.  &  J.G.  Stickley,  Fayettevi 1 le,  New  York," 
(Stickley,  cited  above,  p.  36,  #660). 

2727        BASKET.  Wicker. 

North  Wal 1--Beneath  Pictures 

IMPS  CAT.  NO. 

BOX  COUCH  OR  LOUNGE.  Upholstered.  See  Sears,  p.  776. 
These  rarely  survive.  Check  with  a  reputable  dealer. 
Estimated  cost  of  couch  and  upholstery,  $4500. 

CUSHIONS.  Sofa,  can  be  made  in-house. 

1  Green  Silk  Brocade 

1  Persian  (Paisley)  Cotton 

1  Red  Si  Ik  Brocade 

1  Plain  Red  Cotton 

1  White  with  Embroidered  Corners 

Estimated  Cost,  Piazza  Room:  $5000. 


208 


SITTING  ROOM 

The  Lothrops  used  this  room  as  a  place  to  relax  and  receive  their 
friends.  Harriett  Lothrop  also  wrote  her  books  and  stories  here,  per- 
haps the  most  important  fact  about  the  room.  Margaret  Lothrop  left 
excellent  descriptions,  cited  earlier,  of  her  mother  writing  in  this 
room.  We  also  have  photographic  documentation  of  the  furnishings  and 
their  arrangement. 

North  Wall 


NPS  CAT.  NO. 


10401        PORTIERE  OR  DOOR  DRAPE.  This  is  one  of  two  given  to  the 
park  by  MML.  The  Arts  and  Crafts  pattern  is  appropri- 
ate. 

2351        PRINTS  AND  PHOTOGRAPHS.  Framed  display,  of  Wagner,  his 
house,  his  grave,  and  a  view  of  Germany.  Two  leaves, 
from  trees  near  the  composer's  grave  are  also  included 
in  the  framed  composition  (Illustration  59). 

ELECTRIC  WALL  SCONCES.  Original  to  room. 

2029        TABLE.  Green  marble-topped,  Rococo  revival. 

Books  on  Top  of  Table 

NPS  CAT.  NO. 

8989        Ivanhoe,  Vol.  I. 

8987        Old  Mortality,  Vol.  I. 

2313        PRINT.  Framed,  of  a  mosaic  of  Christ  in  Sicily,  hang- 
ing from  picture  molding. 

East  Wall 


NPS  CAT.  NO, 


2261        PHOTOGRAPH.  Framed,  of  Lincoln  Cathedral  in  England 
hanging  from  picture  molding. 

209 


SITTING  ROOM 

NPS  CAT.  NO. 

2282        PHOTOGRAPH.  Framed,  of  St.  Botolph's  Church  in  Boston, 
hanging  beneath  #2261. 

2549        CANDLE  STAND.  Tilt-top,  top  vertical. 

Shelves  Over  Mantel 

NPS  CAT.  NO. 

1583  CLOCK.  Mantel,  French,  belonged  to  HML  and  DL. 

2597  VASE.  Chinese  export  porcelain. 

1695  BOTTLE.  Mold-blown  glass. 

1628  GOBLET.  Copper  lustre. 

1629  GOBLET.  Copper  lustre. 
1631  TEA  CADDY.  Oriental  export. 
1686  BOTTLE.  Glass. 

1605  SAUCER.  Chinese  export  with  urn  design. 

1606  TEACUP.  Chinese  export  with  urn  design. 
1604        COFFEE  CUP.  Chinese  export  with  urn  design. 

1630  CUP.  English  copper  lustre,  underglazed  with  "Samuel." 
This  belonged  to  Samuel  Stone,  a  relative  of  HML. 

1597        CREAM  JUG.  Helmet,  Chinese  export  porcelain,  mono- 

g rammed  "HNM."  (This  and  all  subsequent  HNM-ware  are 
part  of  the  Mulford  china  in  the  dining  room.) 

1602         TEACUP. 

1599  BOWL.  " 

1600  BOWL.   "HNM." 


210 


SITTING  ROOM 

NPS  CAT.  NO. 

1598        TEAPOT.  "HNM." 

1596         SUGAR  BOWL.   "HNM." 

1594         LID.  To  #1596. 

2244  PHOTOGRAPH.     Framed,   of  Harvey  Mulford,    HML's   grand- 

father. 

1690  CANDY   DISH.     Molded   glass. 

1694  GOBLET.     Pressed   glass. 

1847  FABRIC.      Two  framed   pieces,   supposedly  Martha  Washing- 

ton's wedding  dress. 

1639  CUP.      Blue   glass,  mold   blown,   belonged   to  HML. 

1661  VASE.     Japanese  Imari,    nineteenth   century. 

2599  DRINKING  GLASS.     Souvenir,   with   "Wagner   theatre"   build- 

ing etched  on   side. 

1722  BOWL.     Spun   brass. 

1657  CUP.      Souvenir,   with  North   Bridge  on   side. 

1658  SAUCER.      Souvenir,   with   transfer-printed   scene  of   the 
Wayside  on   it. 

On  Architrave  Below  Mantel 


NPS  CAT.  NO. 

1752  PLAQUE.  Of  "Devil  Looking  Over  England."  Souvenir  pur- 
chased by  HML  in  Lincoln  at  the  Lincoln  Cathedral. 

1753  PLAQUE.  Of  the  "Lincoln  Imp."  Purchased  by  HML  along 
with  #1752. 

2150        PRINT.  Framed,  of  John  Milton.  Purchased  as  souvenir 
by  HML  who  placed  it  here. 


211 


SITTING  ROOM 

Fireplace  Equipment 

NPS  CAT.  NO. 

2145  FIRE  TONGS.  Brass. 

8232  HEARTH  BROOM. 

1807;  1809  ANDIRONS.  Pair,  brass. 

1811  FENDER. 

2039        FIRE  SCREEN.  Decorated  by  Rose  Hawthorne  Lothrop  with 
quotations  from  Mosses  from  an  Old  Manse. 

PINE  CONES.  Tied  to  ribbons  hanging  from  upper  corner 

of  screen  as  in  Illustration  20.  These  can  be  made  from 

flora  on  the  property  and  inexpensive  satin  ribbon  for 
under  $3. 

PINE  CONES.  Hanging  from  edge  of  shelves  with  ribbons 
as  in  Illustration  20. 

2328        PHOTOGRAPH.  Sepia  toned,  of  "Arc  de  Triomphe"  in  Paris, 
framed,  hanging  from  picture  wire  attached  to  molding. 
One  of  HML's  souvenirs. 

FAN.  Palm  leaf  with  flowers  stenciled  on  it,  behind 
photo  as  in  Illustration  20.  Available  in  reproduction 
at  Oriental  import  shops  for  under  $7. 

2236        PRINT.  Of  Rembrandt's  "Night  Watch,"  framed,  hanging 
from  picture  molding. 

2270        PHOTO.  Framed  of  bas-relief  frieze. 

2240        PHOTO.  Framed  of  triptych  by  Lorenzo  Ghiberti  of  the 
Baptistery  Gates  of  Paradise. 

2012        ROCKER.  Ladderback,  from  HML's  family.  She  believed 

it  was  from  England,  but  the  woods,  maple  and  oak,  argue 
for  a  New  England  origin. 

2019        TABLE.  Sheraton. 


212 


SITTING  ROOM 

NPS  CAT.  NO. 

8350         TABLE  RUNNER.  White  cotton. 

2554        LAMP.  Astral,  converted  for  electricity. 

South  Wall 

NPS  CAT.  NO. 

2227-28  CHROMOLITHOGRAPHS.      Pair,   of   angels   in   lancette   frames 

hanging   one   above   the  other. 

WINDOW   SHADES.      Original    to   house. 

10404  CURTAINS.     White   lace,    selected  by  MML. 

2229  PRINT.     Framed,   of  Madonna   and  Child   after  Lippi    origi- 

nal,   hanging   from  picture  molding. 

Books  on  Shelf 


NPS  CAT. 

NO. 

8990 

Ivanhoe  II 

8992 

Waverly  II 

8991 

Waverly  I 

8988 

Old  Mortality  II 

2023 

WRITING  DESK.   HML's 

On  Desk 

NPS  CAT. 

NO. 

1686 

PERFUME  BOTTLE.  Bel 

10343 

BOX.  Durand  chocola 

213 


SITTING  ROOM 
NPS  CAT.  NO. 
1633 


1727 
2472 
2370 
1688 

10405 
2155 

2055 


VASE.  Miniature,  used  by  HML  as  a  pen  holder. 

PENS,  in  vase.  PEN  HOLDERS,  straight.  NIBS.  Available 
at  art  supply  stores  for  about  50$  each. 

INK  STAND.   HML's. 

EYEGLASSES.  HML's. 

ADVERTISEMENT.  For  the  Five  Little  Peppers. 

CHAIR.  Windsor,  in  front  of  desk. 

WINDOW  SHADE.  Original  to  the  room. 

CURTAINS.  White  lace,  selected  by  HML. 

ILLUSTRATION.  Framed,  by  Hermann  Heyer  of  one  of  the 
Five  Little  Peppers  stories  (Illustration  60). 

CHAIR.  Banister-back. 


West  Wall 
NPS  CAT.  NO, 
2154 

2149 

2448 

10400 

2724 


WATERCOLOR.  Framed,  by  Kate  Greenaway,  purchased  by 
Daniel  Lothrop  in  1880. 

OIL.  On  canvas,  framed,  "The  White  Mountains,"  by 
Edwin  Champruy. 

WATERCOLOR.  Framed,  by  W.  Andrews  of  a  pastoral  scene, 

DOOR  DRAPE  OR  PORTIERE.  Matches  those  on  North  Wall. 

CHAIR.  Windsor. 


214 


SITTING  ROOM 

Center  of  Room 

NPS  CAT.  NO. 

10403       RUG.  Domestic  oriental.  Not  original  to  room  but  rep- 
licates the  feeling  of  the  area  rug  seen  in  Illustra- 
tion 20,  taken  in  1888.   Illustration  21,  taken  in 
about  1922,  shows  a  Brussels  carpet,  now  missing.  This 
carpet  was  quite  worn  in  the  photograph. 

2588        ROCKER.  Wicker.  Where  HML  liked  to  sit  and  think  about 
the  Peppers. 

CUSHIONS.  Chintz,  for  rocker  made  from  a  reproduction 
fabric  and  feather  cushions.  Schumacher  fabric  similar 
to  that  used  in  the  West  Chamber  would  be  appropriate. 
Estimated  cost:  $50.  per  cushion  or  $100. 


Estimated  Cost,  Sitting  Room:  $115. 

EAST  CHAMBER 

This  room  should  portray  MML's  presence  at  the  Wayside.  This  was 
her  room  after  1905.  The  interpreter  has  an  opportunity  in  the  east 
chamber  to  discuss  MML's  role  in  the  house  and  its  preservation. 

North  Wall 


NPS  CAT. 


9492        PRINT.  Framed,  "Girl  Standing,"  hanging  from  picture 
molding. 

1976         CHAIR.  Windsor. 

WALL  SCONCE.  Electric.  North  and  West  Wall  sconces 
original  to  room. 

2288        PRINT.  Framed,  "Sibilla  Delthea,"  hanging  from  picture 
molding. 


215 


EAST  CHAMBER 

NPS  CAT.  NO. 

2697 

CHEST  OF  DRAWERS. 

2653 

WASH  BASIN. 

TOILET  SET.  Brush,  comb,  mirror,  hair  receiver,  hair- 
pin box,  and  hairpins.  Available  at  a  thrift  shop,  or 
second-hand   shop.     Estimated   cost:      $45. 


East  Wall 

NPS  CAT. 

NO. 

* 

2089 

PANEL  BED. 

10449 

MATTRESS.  On  bed.  No  NPS  number 

10447 

SHEET. 

10448 

SHEET. 
PILLOW. 

10445 

PILLOW  CASE. 

10446 

BLANKET. 

10450 

BEDSPREAD. 

2616 

SCRAP  BASKET.  Wicker. 

10451 

CURTAINS. 

2581 

ROCKING  CHAIR. 

2212. 


PRINT.  Framed,  "Girl  With  A  Muff,"  hanging  from  picture 
molding. 


2546 


CHAIR. 


216 


EAST  CHAMBER 

South  Wal 1 

NPS  CAT.  NO. 

10452 

CURTAINS. 

10453 

CURTAINS. 

2248 

PRINT.   F 

PRINT.     Framed,   "Birches,"    hanging   from  picture  mold- 
ing. 


West  Wall 


NPS  CAT. 

NO 

2103 

2110 

2121 

Over  Mant 

el 

NPS  CAT. 

NO 

2789 

2790 

2247 

Fireplace 

i 

NPS   CAT.    NO 

1797 

8003 

8004 

2144 


CHEST  OF   DRAWERS.      Hepplewhite. 
MIRROR.      Hanging  from  picture  molding 
CHAIR. 


PRINT.  Pre-Raphaelite  angel,  in  stand-up  frame, 
PRINT.  Pre-Raphaelite  angel,  in  stand-up  frame, 
PRINT.      "Emerson,"    in   stand-up   frame. 


FENDER. 

ANDIRON.  Brass. 
ANDIRON.  Brass. 

SHOVEL.  With  brass  top, 


217 


EAST  CHAMBER 

NPS  CAT.  NO. 

1794        TONGS.  Brass. 

2570         POKER. 

Center  of  Room 

NPS  CAT.  NO. 

8094        RUG.  Oriental  style. 

2558         HAT  BOX. 

10040        BOX. 

10039        FOOTLOCKER.  Numbers  2558,  10040,  and  10039  stacked  at 
foot  of  bed. 


In  Closet 

NPS  CAT.  NO. 

8154         HAT.  MML's. 

8440         SHOE.   MML's. 

10430       COAT.  Black,  MML's. 

Estimated  Cost,  East  Chamber:  $45. 

GUEST  ROOM  OR  TERRACE  ROOM 

Sometime  after  DL's  death  in  1893  and  MML's  return  from  college  in 
1905,  this  room  became  HML's  bedroom.   It  is  recommended  that  this 
room  portray  HML's  occupancy.  According  to  an  interview  with  MML,  the 
wallpaper  in  this  room  was  original  to  the  Hawthornes.  The  woodwork 
colors  date  to  HML's  occupancy. 


218 


GUEST  ROOM  OR  TERRACE  ROOM 
North  Wall 


NPS  CAT 

2081 

2113 


10431 
1988 
1987 
2098 

East  Wall 
NPS  CAT.  NO, 

10432 
8438 

10434 

10435 
2572 

8349 


CHEST  OF  DRAWERS.  With  high  mirror. 

CLOTHES  POLE. 

WALL  SCONCES.  Original  to  room.  No  NPS  number. 

WINDOW  SHADES.  Original  to  room. 

CURTAINS.  Chintz,  reproduced  from  the  original  pair. 

MIRROR.  Pier,  grained  frame. 

TABLE.  Demilune  pier,  in  front  of  mirror. 

LAMP.  Hurricane,  on  pier  table. 


WINDOW  SHADE.  Original  to  room. 

CURTAINS.  Chintz,  reproduced  from  the  original  pair. 

WING  CHAIR.  Wicker. 

CUSHION.  Small,  on  chair,  reproduction. 

PILLOWCASE.  On  cushion,  made  from  reproduction  Chintz. 

PILLOW.  Large,  on  chair,  reproduction. 

PILLOWCASE.  Large,  on  chair,  made  from  reproduction 
Chintz. 

TABLE.  Small,  pine.  Copies  of  Wide  Awake  from  the 
park's  collection  on  the  table.  These  should  be  rotated 
to  preserve  them. 

TABLE  SCARF.  On  table. 


219 


GUEST  ROOM  OR  TERRACE  ROOM 

NPS  CAT.  NO. 

2099 

1991 


1992 

10426 

10427 

10428 

10429 

10425 

8398 
8395 
10440 
2226 


1990 
2452 
2778 


LAMP.  Hurricane,  on  table. 


BED.  Ash,  part  of  set  purchased  by  the  Lothrops  in 
1883. 

BEDSPRINGS.  Frame. 

SHEET. 

SHEET. 

BLANKET. 

MATTRESS. 

PILLOW. 

PILLOW. 

PILLOW  SLIP. 

PILLOW  SLIP. 

BEDSPREAD. 

CHROMOLITHOGRAPH.  "Nun  Lighting  Candles,"  framed,  hang- 
ing from  picture  molding  over  bed. 

WALL  SCONCE.  Original  to  room.  No  NPS  number. 

BUREAU. 

COLOGNE  BOTTLE.  On  bureau. 

TRAY.  Ceramic,  on  bureau. 

HAIRPINS.  On  tray.  Reproductions  are  available  in 
five  and  dime  stores  for  under  $1. 

TOILET  SET.  Brush,  combs,  mirror,  hair  receiver,  hair- 
pin container.  Available  through  second-hand  stores. 
Estimated  cost:  $45. 


220 


GUEST  ROOM  OR  TERRACE  ROOM 

South  Wall 

NPS  CAT.  NO. 

2156        OIL.  "Country  Scene,"  on  canvas,  framed,  hanging  from 
picture  molding,  over  mantel. 

On  Mantel 


NPS  CAT.  NO. 

1766         CANDLESTICK.   Brass. 

2174        SKETCH.  Of  Polly  Pepper,  framed,  leaning  against  wall 

West  Wall 

NPS  CAT.  NO. 

1989  TOILET  CUPBOARD.  With  mirror. 

8382  TOWEL.  Linen,  hanging  from  towel  bar  on  cupboard. 

1993  COMMODE. 

8331  TOWEL.  On  top  of  commode. 

1979  SOAP  TRAY. 

SOAP.      Plain   castile,    in   tray.     Available  through   a 
supermarket   or   five   and   dime   store   for  50<{:  per  cake. 

1977  PITCHER. 

1978  WASHBOWL. 

WALL  SCONCE.  Electrified,  original  to  room.  No  NPS 
number. 

1981         ROCKING  CHAIR. 

WINDOW  SHADE.  Original  to  room. 


221 


GUEST  ROOM  OR  TERRACE  ROOM 

NPS  CAT.  NO. 

10439        CURTAINS.  Reproduction  Chintz,  after  originals. 

Estimated  Cost,  Guest  Room  or  Terrace  Room:  $50. 

LARGE  BATHROOM 

This  room  was  used  by  the  Lothrops  for  sanitation  and  hygiene. 

The  plumbing  fixtures  are  original. 

North  Wall 

NPS  CAT.  NO. 

2017        CHAIR.  Windsor,  bamboo  style. 

10468       CURTAINS.  Window,  reproduction  of  white  dimity  cur- 
tains used  by  HML. 

WINDOW  SHADE.  Green.  Presented  to  the  Wayside  by  MIL. 

2195        BASKET.  Large,  wicker,  originally  used  for  soiled 
towel s. 

WEIGHTS  AND  PULLEYS.  Affixed  to  wall.  Estimated  cost 
$125. 

East  Wall 


NPS  CAT. 


MIRROR.  Considered  a  fixture  on  the  wall.  This  has 
always  been  in  the  room. 

TOWELS.  Linen,  over  towel  bar.  Reproduction  towels  are 
available  through  department  stores;  or  a  dry  goods 
firm  can  supply  the  linen;  and  park  staff  can  hem  them. 

2696        CHEST  OF  DRAWERS.  Believed  to  have  been  purchased  from 
the  Hawthornes,  and  always  located  in  this  room. 


222 


LARGE    BATHROOM 
NPS   CAT.    NO. 


South  Wall 


NPS  CAT, 


West  Wall 


DUST  RUNNER.      Linen,   on   chest   of  drawers.     The  one   pres- 
ently  in   the  room   is   appropriate  but   has   no   number. 

MUG.     Green   and  white,   for   shaving.     A  green  milk   glass 
mug  would   be   appropriate,   or  a  green   earthenware  mug. 
Available  from  a  dealer  who  specializes   in   late  nine- 
teenth-century objects.     Estimated  cost:     $25. 

SOAP  DISH.     Small    ceramic   dish   would   be   suitable. 
Estimated   cost:      $5. 

BASIN.     Enamel,   probably  used   for   a  shaving   bowl.     An 
enamel,   shallow  bowl,    approximately  10  inches   in  diam- 
eter can   be  found    in   a  second-hand   store   for   approxi- 
mately $5. 


BATH  TOWEL.     Over   towel    bar.     A  plain  white   terry  towel 
would   be   suitable.     Cost:      $5.     The   pile  on   the   towel 
should   not  be   as  thick  as   present-day  towels. 


NPS  CAT.    NO. 

8496        BATH  MAT.  Hung  over  the  side  of  tub. 

10467        SOAP  DISH. 

SOAP.  Cake  of  castile  or  white  soap  for  dish.  Cost 
50$. 

Center  of  Room 

NPS  CAT.  NO. 

8559        RUG.  Hooked. 


223 


LARGE    BATHROOM 

NPS   CAT.    NO. 

8629  RUG.     Striped 


Estimated  Cost,   Large  Bathroom: 


$250, 


MAID'S   ROOM 

The   furnishings   in   this   room  should   reflect   the  residence  of  the 

Lothrop  family's   live-in   help,  making   a   statement   about   the  Lothrops1 

economic   status   and   about   the   life-styles  of   late  nineteenth-century 

domestics. 


North  Wa 

11 

NPS  CAT. 

NO. 

10466 

BED.   Iron 

and  brass. 

10464 

MATTRESS. 

8506 

SHEET. 

8425 

SHEET. 

10463 

BEDSPREAD. 

Black  and 

9441 

PILLOW. 

2093 

PILLOW. 

2114 


WINDOW  CURTAINS.     Made  to   approximate   the   original    de- 
sign.    These   should   be  a   simple   pair   of   cotton,    light 
and  medium  blue   printed   curtains,   with   tiebacks. 
Fabric   patterns   should   be  examined   in   back    issues   of 
Sears   catalogs,    and   an   attempt   made  to   approximate  MML's 
vague  description  of  the  originals   (see  p.   157). 

BUREAU. 


224 


MAID'S  ROOM 

NPS  CAT.  NO. 

2215        PRINT.  "Girl  in  White  Dress,"  hanging  from  picture 
molding  on  wall  above  bureau. 

East  Wall 


NPS  CAT 


WINDOW  SHADE.  Presented  to  the  Wayside  by  MML. 

CURTAINS.  As  described  on  North  Wall,  above. 

2216        PRINT.  "Man  and  Woman  Walking,"  hanging  from  picture 
molding  above  mantel. 

CHEST  OF  DRAWERS.  Painted  brown,  that  approximates  the 
green  chest  of  drawers  already  in  the  room.  Source:  A 
local  antiques  dealer.  Estimated  cost:  $225. 

BUREAU  SCARF.  Linen.  Approximate  cost:  $5. 

South  Wall 

NPS  CAT.  NO. 

2646         SIDE  CHAIR. 

CURTAINS.   In  four-panel  sections  in  fabric  that  matches 
the  window  curtains,  suspended  from  rods  in  front  of 
"clothes  press." 


West  Wall 


NPS  CAT, 


BED.     Single,    iron   and   brass,    approximately  the   same 
style   as   the  one   now   in  the  room.      Source:      Dealer  who 
specializes   in    late   nineteenth-century  antiques,   or   one 
who  deals   exclusively   in   brass   beds.     Estimated   cost: 
$350-$500. 


225 


MAID'S   ROOM 

NPS   CAT.    NO. 

MATTRESS.     Available   from  second-hand   store  for  $25. 
This   should   be  the  type  with   a  tick   cover   and   buttons. 

SHEETS.  Two.  If  the  bed  is  to  be  displayed  made  up, 
any  type  of  sheets  will  give  the  bedspread  the  proper 
drape. 

FEATHER  PILLOWS.  Two.  Tick  covers.  Cost:  $10.  eacn. 
Source:     Second-hand   shops. 

BEDSPREAD.     Similar   to   the  one   in   the   room.      Source: 

Second-hand   store.     Cost:  $10.     As   an   alternative,    a 

seersucker,   striped  fabric  could   be  purchased   and  made 
into  a   suitable   spread. 

2214  PRINT.      "Girl    in  Neoclassical   Dress,"   over   bed,    hanging 

from  picture  molding. 

1980  WASHSTAND. 

2134  MIRROR.     Above  washstand   on  wall. 

8406  WASHBOWL. 

8403  PITCHER. 

8404  SOAP  DISH. 

8408  SLOP   JAR 

HAND  TOWELS.  Linen,  two,  hanging  from  the  rails  of  the 
washstand.  Available  in  second-hand  shops  for  $3  each, 
or  made  from  reproduction  fabric   at  the  park. 

Center  of  Room 

NPS  CAT.  NO. 

8084-85      RUGS.  Braided,  scattered  on  the  floor. 

Estimated  Cost,  Maid's  Room:  $1016. 


226 


SMALL  BATHROOM 

No  furnishings  data  survive  for  this  room,  and  no  furnishings  are 
recommended  here.  The  Lothrops  used  the  larger  bathroom.  This  small 
bathroom  was  not  installed  until  1910,  a  few  years  before  the  Lothrops 
began  to  rent  the  property.  Furnishing  the  larger  bathroom,  which  is 
well  documented,  will  sufficiently  interpret  this  function  at  the  Way- 
side. 

TOWER  STUDY 

This   room,  more  than   any  other   at   the  Wayside,   provides   an   oppor- 
tunity to  portray  the  Lothrops'    (especially  HML's)   ideas   about   his- 
toric  interpretation,    and  to  discuss  the  Victorian's  expectations  of 
an   historic   house.     The  Lothrops   used   this   room  as   a   shrine  to  Nathan- 
iel  Hawthorne.      It   is   the   epitome  of  the  Wayside  tour.     While  no   in- 
ventory survives,    an   abundant   amount  of   photographic   evidence   (Illus- 
trations 28  through  32)   exists.     HML  considered  Hawthorne  one  of 
America's   greatest   authors.      Despite   the  considerable  conflicts    in   the 
world   views   of  HML  and  Hawthorne,   she  memorialized   him  at   the  Wayside 
and,   by  virtue  of   her  occupancy,    set   herself   in   a  direct   continuum 
from  Hawthorne   in   the   annals   of  American   literature. 

North  Wall 


NPS  CAT.    NO. 

2300  BUST  OF  A  WOMAN.     On   top  of  built-in   cupboards 


227 


TOWER  STUDY 

Inside  Cupboard 

IMPS  CAT.  NO. 

Illustration  30  demonstrates   that   MiML  kept   displays   and 
label    copy  inside  the  cupboards.     A  similar  display 
might   be  made.     The   photos   appear   to   be   famous   American 
authors,    philosophers,    and   statesmen. 

WALL   SCONCE.     Original    to   room.      No  NPS  number. 

WINDOW   SHADES.     Green.     Original    to   room.      In   summer, 
tack   a  piece  of   screening  to  one   of  the  windows   as   MML 
did  for  ventilation   (see  Illustration  30). 

2209  PEDESTAL. 

1986  BUST.     Of  Voltaire,   on   pedestal. 

2301  BUST.     Of  Plato,    on   top  of  built-in   cupboard. 

East  Wall 


NPS  CAT.    NO. 

2014        TABLE.  Drop-leaf,  Federal  style  pembroke. 

2204        BOOKCASE.  Oak,  swivel,  from  D.  Lothrop  Co. 

Books  in  Bookcase 

NPS  CAT.  NO. 

2155        The  Hawthorne  Centenary  at  the  Wayside,  Concord,  1904, 
T.W.  Higginson. 

2565        Hawthorne  at  the  Old  Manse  by  Allen  French. 

2795         Nathaniel  Hawthorne  Man  and  Writer  by  Edward  Wagen- 
kneeht. 

2824        Nathaniel  Hawthorne  by  Austin  Warren. 


228 


TOWER  STUDY 

NPS  CAT.  NO. 

8849        Nathaniel  Hawthorne,  The  American  Years  by  Robert  Cant- 
wel  1. 

8825        Personal  Recollections  of  Nathaniel  Hawthorne  by  Horatio 
Bridge. 

8837        Life  of  Nathaniel  Hawthorne  by  Moncure  D.  Conway. 

8849  Nathaniel  Hawthorne,  The  American  Years  by  Robert  Cant- 
wel  1 . 

8850  Sorrow  Bui  It  a  Bridge  by  Katherine  Burton. 

8853  Tales  of  Nathaniel  Hawthorne,  John  Brook  Moore,  ed. 

8865  Favorite  Authors. 

8866  Yesterday  With  Authors,  James  T.  Field. 

8867  Yesterday  With  Authors,  James  T.  Field. 
8895  Archibald  Malmaison,  Julian  Hawthorne. 

8897  The  Novels  and  Tales  of  Nathaniel  Hawthorne. 

8898  Confessions  and  Criticisms,  J.  Hawthorne. 

8899  Hawthorne  and  His  Circle.,  J.  Hawthorne. 

8900  Hawthorne  and  His  Circle,  J.  Hawthorne. 

8901  Nathaniel  Hawthorne  and  His  Wife,  Vol.  I,  J.  Hawthorne. 

WALL  SCONCE.  Original  to  room. 

2208        BOOKCASE.  Belonged  to  the  Hawthornes. 

FABRIC.  Plain  red  wool  fabric  covering  bookcase.  MML 
recalls  this  was  used  as  a  protection  by  her  mother. 


229 


TOWER  STUDY 

On  Bookcase 

NPS  CAT.  NO. 

2306        BUST.  Pestalozzo. 

2571        BUST.  Benjamin  Franklin. 

In  Bookcase 


NPS  CAT.  NO. 

8902  Nathaniel  Hawthorne  and  His  Wife,  Vol.  II,  J.  Hawthorne. 

8903  Selections  From  Hawthorne  and  His  Friends. 
8906  American  Literary  Scene,  Manning  Hawthorne,  ed. 
8910  Shapes  That  Pass,  Julian  Hawthorne. 

8914  The  Hawthorne  Centenary  at  the  Wayside,  1904. 

8915  The  Hawthorne  Centenary  at  the  Wayside,  1904. 
8933  Memories  of  Hawthorne  by  Rose  Lathrop. 

8938  The  Life  of  Horace  Mann  by  Mary  Mann. 

8951  A  Fire  Was  Lighted,  Theodore  Maynard 

8960  The  Rebellious  Puritan,  Helen  A.  Clarke. 

8999  Brief  Biographies,  Lloyd  Morris. 

9004  The  Life  and  Times  of  Nathaniel  Hawthorne,  Frank  Preston 
Stearns. 

9017  Hawthorne  and  His  Publisher,  Caroline  Ticknor. 

9018  The  Hawthorne  Centenary  at  the  Wayside,  1904. 
9020  Hawthorne's  Country,  Helen  A.  Clarke. 


230 


TOWER  STUDY 

iMPS  CAT.  NO. 

9022  Tales,  Sketches  and  Other  Papers  by  Nathaniel  Hawthorne, 
G.  Lathrop. 

9059  Nathaniel  Hawthorne,  George  E.  Woodbery. 

9237  Hawthorne  and  His  Friends,  F.B.  Sanborn. 

9271  Romantic  Rebel ,  Hildegard  Hawthorne. 

9364  The  House  of  the  Seven  Gables,  N.  Hawthorne. 

9366  Aunt  Ebe,  Manning  Hawthorne. 

9379  Nathaniel  Hawthorne  and  the  Tradition  of  Gothic 
Romance,  J.  Lundblad. 

9380  Nathaniel  Hawthorne  Prepares  for  College,  Manning 
Hawthorne. 

9381  Nathaniel  Hawthorne  at  Bowdoin  College,  Manning  Haw- 
thorne. 

9382  Hawthorne  Spectator,  Elizabeth  Hawthorne,  ed. 

South  Wall 

NPS  CAT.  NO. 

2100        PRINT.  Framed,  Nathaniel  Hawthorne,  hanging  from 
picture  molding. 

On  Mantel 

NPS  CAT.  NO. 

1783;  1785    OIL  LAMPS.  Pair,  electrified,  at  either  end  of  mantel 
as  in  Illustration  28. 

2174  DRAWING.  Framed,  of  Polly  Pepper  praying,  with  explana- 
tion and  autograph  of  HML,  in  center  of  mantel  as  in  Il- 
lustration 28. 


231 


TOWER  STUDY 
NPS  CAT.  NO. 


OBELISK.  Small,  to  the  right  of  #2174  as  in  Illustra- 
tion 28.  This  was  obviously  a  souvenir.  They  are  still 
available  for  approximately  $3. 


In  Front  of  Fireplace 

NPS  CAT.  NO. 

2000 

2207 


CHAIR.  Windsor,  red 


CHAIR.  Painted,  late  nineteenth  or  early  twentieth  cen- 
tury. 

CUSHION.  Down,  covered  with  a  red  slip  case,  on  the 
chair,  as  in  Illustration  28. 


West  Wall 


NPS  CAT, 


2016 


BOOKSHELF.      Bamboo-turned,  mounted   on  wall.     These  were 
popular  during  the   last  quarter  of  the  nineteenth   cen- 
tury.    Approximate  cost:     $125.     Source:     Dealers  who 
specialize   in  nineteenth-century  antiques. 

PAGE.     From   an   edition   of  The  Scarlet  Letter   showing 
Hester  Prynne  knocking   at   the  door.     This   page   is   tacked 
to   the   wall    in   Illustration  33.     Approximate  cost: 
$10. 

TABLE.      Drop-leaf,   with   one   leaf   extended. 

CARD.      On   table   to   simulate  the  one   in   Illustration  33. 

CARD  TEXT.     Reads,   "HAWTHORNE   TOWER.     After   his   return 
from   Italy,    Hawthorne  wanted   a  tower   room  that   reminded 
him  of  Monte  Auto,    and  where   he   could   work   undisturbed. 
He  built   this   in  1856  where   surrounded   by  the  waving 
pines   he   could    look   off   to   the   quiet   country  he   loved   as 
he   paced   to   and   fro.      The   standing  desk    in   the   corner 
was   built   by  his   own   hand." 


232 


TOWER    STUDY 
NPS   CAT.    NO 


PINE   BOUGHS.     HML's   association  of   historic    interpreta- 
tion with  euhemerism   is   obvious   from  the   shrine-like 
room  arrangements    in   the   early  photographs   of  the  Way- 
side.    Whether   she  valued   pine  boughs   for   the   symbolic 
aspects   of  coniferous   plants,    i.e.    always   green,   full    of 
life   and   longevity,    or  merely  as   useful    ornaments,    this 
room  would   be   incomplete  without   pine   bough  decorations 
at   least   on   important   anniversaries.     The   greens  display 
is   seen    in   Illustrations  28  and  33. 


Estimated  Cost,   Tower  Study:  $140.00 

UNA'S   ROOM 

The  Lothrops   used   this   room   as   a  guest   room.      Since  the  1914   in- 
ventory describes   this   as   the   "blue   room,"    there   is   some   question 
whether   the  Lothrops   associated   the   room  with  Una  Hawthorne.     This 
room  provides   the   interpreter  with   the  opportunity  to  discuss   both 
Una   and  HML's  many  friends  who   visited   the   Wayside. 

North  Wal1--Northwest  Corner 

NPS  CAT.    NO. 

2069        VANITY  TABLE.  Part  of  the  complete  bedroom  suite  in 
this  room. 

On  Table 

NPS  CAT.  NO. 

1683-84      PERFUME  BOTTLES. 


233 


UNA'S  ROOM 

Window  Hangings 

NPS  CAT.  NO. 

10421  CURTAINS.      White,    sheer,    from  MML  but    probably  not 

original    to   this   room. 

DEEP   VALANCE.     Liberty  of  London   print   fabric    (select 
from   local   Liberty  of  London  dealer),    suspended   from 
large  curtain   rings   on  brass-ended   curtain   rods.     These 
wood   and  brass  curtain  rods   are  mentioned   in  Carroll's 
interview  with   MML  on  August   15,   1966.      Nearby  sources 
for   reproductions   can   be  found    in  The  Old-House  Jour- 
nal ' s  Buyer' s  Guide   (issued   annually),   199  Berkeley 
Place,    Brooklyn,    New  York   11217.      See   Illustration  34 
for  guidelines. 

2565  SIDE   CHAIR.     Windsor. 

WALL   SCONCE.     Electrified.     Original    to   room.      No  NPS 
number. 


East  Wall 


NPS  CAT.    NO 


2233  PRINT.      Framed,   "Mary  Queen   of   Scots,"   hanging  from   a 

picture   hook    about   six   inches   above   the   top   of   the 
frame. 

CURTAIN.     Across   closet   doorway  made  from  Liberty  of 
London   fabric,    suspended   from  curtain   rings    and   hanging 
from   a  wooden   rod  with   brass   ends. 

STEAMER  TRUNK.      See   the  trunk   in   the  foreground   of   Il- 
lustration 34  for   guidelines.      If   such   a  trunk   is   not 
already  in  the  park's   possession,    second-hand   stores 
carry  them  for   approximately  $65. 


234 


UNA'S  ROOM 

Over  Mantel 

NPS  CAT.    NO. 

2053  CHROMOLITHOGRAPH.     Framed,   "Girl   Picking  Petals  from 

Daisies,"   believed   to   have  been   purchased  by  Daniel 
Lothrop.      Illustration  34  shows   this   print   hanging  over 
the  mantel.      It   should   be  hung   in   the   same  manner, 
tilting  out   over   the  mantel. 

On  Mantel 


NPS  CAT. 


LAMBREQUIN.     Large,    as   in   Illustration  34.      No   records 
survive  that   describe  this    in  detail.      From  the   photo- 
graph  it   appears  to   have  been   a  light-colored  fabric 
with   a  band   of   tassels   sewn   to   the  front   edge.      In   keep- 
ing with   the  colors   of   the   room,    a  light   blue   silk   is 
recommended.      Scalamandre   fabrics   produces   a   line  of 
ready-made  trimmings  which  would   be   suitable  for  the 
tassels. 

1767-68  CANDLESTICKS.      Pair. 

8150  WORKBASKET. 

2777  VASE.     Blue  enameled. 

1582  CLOCK.     Ansonia  Clock  Works,   1881. 

2056  ROCKER.     Mid-nineteenth   century. 

CURTAIN.      Liberty  of  London   print   across   closet   door- 
way.    See   above  description. 

South  Wall 


NPS  CAT 


2182  PRINT.     Framed,   "Charming  Kate,"   hanging   from   a  long 

picture  wire   as   in   Illustration  34. 


235 


UNA'S  ROOM 

NPS  CAT.  NO. 

CALENDAR.  Any  small  calendar  of  the  type  distributed  as 
promotional  items  by  retailers,  dating  between  1888  and 
1914.  These  can  be  found  in  second-hand  stores.  A  silk 
ribbon  rosette  should  be  affixed  to  the  upper  corner  of 
the  calendar  as  in  Illustration  34. 

WINDOW  HANGINGS.  See  above  description. 

2220        PHOTOGRAPH.  Of  a  Burne-Jones  print,  "Stairway  of  Life" 
or  "Girl  on  Staircase,"  hanging  from  long  picture  wire 
as  in  Illustration  34. 

2299        PRINT.  Framed,  "Ave  Maria"  after  Delia  Robbia,  hanging 
from  short  Dicture  wire  beneath  #2182.  See  Illustration 
34. 


West  Wall 


NPS  CAT.  NO. 

2067  BED.  Rococo  revival. 
8410-12  MATTRESS. 

8513  SHEET. 

PILLOWS.  Feather,  two  (no  numbers). 

9440  PILLOW  COVER.  "DL"  embroidered  into  the  edge. 

9442  PILLOW  COVER.  "MML"  embroidered  into  the  edge. 

PILLOW  SHAM.  Lace,  suspended  from  curtain  bar  as  in 

Illustration  34.   Inexpensive  curtain  lace  is  still 

available  from  Sears,  Roebuck  and  Co.  Two  satin  bows 
should  be  attached  to  the  front. 

8522        QUILT.  Folded  at  the  foot  of  bed. 

2068  COMMODE. 


236 


UNA'S   ROOM 
NPS   CAT.    NO. 


COVER.      Linen,   with   tatted   edges,   over  commode.     See 
Illustration  34. 


2775 

SLOP  JAR.   Inside  commode. 

2695 

TOWEL  RACK. 

2475 

TOWEL. 

8331 

TOWEL. 

8333 

TOWEL. 

2070 

WASHSTANO. 

2774 

SOAP  DISH. 

2797 

GIRANDOLE.  Gold. 

WASHBASIN  AND   PITCHER.     On  washstand.     An   ironstone   set 
is  recommended.     These   are  available   in   second-hand 
stores   or   antique  dealers   for   about  $100. 


Center  of  Room 


NPS  CAT.  NO, 


RUG.  Domestic  oriental,  approximately  4 '  x6'.  See  Il- 
lustration 34.  These  are   available  through  any  reputa- 
ble rug  dealer,  such  as  Jerehian  Brothers  or  Maloumian 
Brothers  in  Philadelphia,  or  Dildarian  in  New  York. 
Often,  rug  cleaners  who  store  rugs  will  have  unclaimed 
rugs  at  reduced  prices.  Estimated  cost:  Up  to  $1500, 
depending  upon  condition. 


Estimated  Cost,  Una's  Room:  $1800. 


237 


UPPER    FRONT   HALL 

Although  this   space  was   only  used   by  the   occupants   as   a  passage 
between  rooms,    the  Lothrops   did   keep   some  furniture   and  mementos    in 
it.     Some  of  the  objects   relate   to  Daniel   Lothrop.     This   provides   the 
interpreter  with   an  opportunity  to  discuss  Lothrop,    as   elsewhere   his 
presence   is   not   as   strong   as   his   wife's   or  daughter's. 

North  Wall 


NPS  CAT.  NO 


WINDOW  SHADE.  Original  to  space.  No  NPS  number 


East  Wall 

NPS  CAT.  NO. 

2237        CERTIFICATE.  Framed,  of  DL's  membership  in  the  Boston- 
i an  Society,  hanging  from  ceiling  cove  molding  over 
Northeast  Passage  doorway. 

2201        WATERCOLOR.  Framed,  of  the  Wayside  by  Mrs.  Isaac 

Fenno,  1891,  hanging  from  cove  molding  over  Hawthorne 
Bedroom  doorway. 

CLOCK.  See  Illustration  36.  A  wall  clock  marked  "D 
Lothrop  Co."  once  hung  over  the  Hawthorne  Bedroom  door- 
way. The  whereabouts  of  this  clock  is  unknown  and  be- 
cause of  its  highly  personal  association,  a  substitute 
is  not  recommended.   It  is  listed  as  a  record  of  what 
appeared  in  the  hall  if  an  opportunity  to  acquire  such  a 
clock  ever  arises. 


South  Wall 


NPS  CAT 


WINDOW  SHADE.  Original  to  this  space.  No  NPS  number. 


238 


UPPER  FRONT  HALL 

NPS  CAT.  NO. 

2202        CHAIR.  Windsor,  with  "Ephraim  Wales  Bull"  stenciled  on 
the  crest  rail. 

East  Wall 

NPS  CAT.  NO. 

2087        PRINT.  Framed,  "Pilgrims  Signing  the  Compact,"  hanging 
from  picture  molding. 

2445        PRINT.  Framed,  "Milton  In  His  Blindness,"  hanging  part 
way  down  the  stair  wall. 

Center  of  Room 

NPS  CAT.  NO. 

CARPETING.  Green,  as  in  lower  front  hall. 

HANGING  LANTERN.  Now  electrified,  at  the  top  of  the 
stairs,  installed  in  1906. 

Estimated  Cost,  Upper  Front  Hall:  $00. 


WEST  CHAMBER  OR  HAWTHORNE  BEDROOM 

This  was  MML's  bedroom  when  she  was  a  child.  After  she  began 

using  the  East  Chamber,  this  room  served  as  an  extra  guest  room. 

North  Wall 


NPS  CAT, 


1808        HIGH  CHEST.  Queen  Anne,  probably  South  Shore,  Massachu- 
setts. 


239 


WEST  CHAMBER  OR  HAWTHORNE  BEDROOM 
NPS  CAT.  NO. 


2221 


CHROMOLITHOGRAPH.  Framed,  "Girls  on  Hill,"  hanging  from 
picture  molding  over  bed. 

WALL  SCONCE.  Electric.  Original  to  room.  No  NPS  num- 
ber. 


2115 

SLEIGH  BED. 

2116 

MATTRESS. 

8461 

SHEET. 

10455 

SHEET. 

10456 

BLANKET. 

PILLOWS.  Two,  on  bed. 

8398 

PILLOW  SLIP. 

8395 

PILLOW  SLIP. 

East  Wall 

NPS  CAT. 

NO. 

8457 

PORTIERE.  Chintz,  for 

Chintz,  for  closet  doorway.  Available  from 
F.  Schumacher  Co.,  for  about  $75.  This  should  match  the 
other  chintz  in  the  room. 


Over  Mantel 
NPS  CAT.  NO 
2256 


PRINT.  Framed,  "Capture  of  Andromache." 


240 


WEST  CHAMBER  OR  HAWTHORNE  BEDROOM 

On  Mantel 

NPS  CAT.  NO. 

1763-64      CANDLESTICKS.  Pair,  brass. 

1634-35      VASES.   Imitation  Frankenthal,  hand  painted,  a  wedding 
present  to  HML. 

Firepl ace 

NPS  CAT.  NO. 

2104  FENDER.  Wire  and  brass. 

2105-06  ANDIRONS.  Pair. 

1790  EQUIPMENT  STAND. 

1791  FIRE  TONGS. 
9463  FIRE  POKER. 

1792  FIRE  SHOVEL. 

2231        PRINT,  "A  Morning  in  the  Tropics." 

2111         CHEST  OF  DRAWERS.  Federal. 

2109         TOILET  MIRROR  AND  STAND.  On  chest. 

WALL  SCONCE.  Electric.  No  NPS  number. 

South  Wall 


NPS  CAT.  NO. 


10457-58  CURTAINS.     Chintz.      Reproduced   after  original    set   by 

HML. 

WINDOW  SHADES.     Original    to   the  Wayside. 


241 


WEST  CHAMBER  OR  HAWTHORNE  BEDROOM 

NPS  CAT.  NO. 

2096        ROCKING  CHAIR.  Cane  seat  and  back. 

2213        PRINT.  Framed,  "Erasmus,"  hanging  from  picture 
molding. 


West 

Wall 

NPS  I 

:at.  i 

2097 

2123 

-24 

DESK.   Drop-front. 

OIL  LAMPS.  Glass,  pair. 

BUREAU  SCARF.   No  NPS  number. 

1668        BOWL.  Ceramic. 

2686        MIRROR.  Hanging  from  picture  molding  above  desk. 

10460        CURTAINS.  Chintz. 

2108        SHAVING  TABLE.  Salem,  early  nineteenth  century.  Be- 
lieved to  have  belonged  to  Hawthorne. 

Center  of  Room 

NPS  CAT.  NO. 

8072        RUG.  Braided,  wool.  Presented  to  NPS  by  MML. 

SCREEN.  Wood  and  chintz.  No  longer  in  NPS  collection. 
A  substitute  screen  can  be  found  in  an  antiques  shop  and 
fitted  with  reproduction  chintz,  matching  the  other 
chintz  in  the  room,  all  for  about  $275.  Plain  rect- 
angles as  in  Stickley's  Craftsmen  Furniture  Series 
would  be  appropriate. 

Estimated  Cost,  West  Chamber  or  Hawthorne  Bedroom:         $350. 


242 


SPECIAL  INSTALLATION,  MAINTENANCE  AND  PROTECTION  RECOMMENDATIONS 

(Diana  R.  Pardue) 

This  section  contains  instructions  on  maintaining  a  safe  environment 
for  museum  objects  in  the  historic  house,  performing  necessary 
collection  maintenance,  and  maintaining  adequate  security.  See  Part  D 
for  potential  sources  of  assistance  in  implementing  this  section. 

A.     THE  ENVIRONMENT 

Maintaining  a  stable  environment  within  a  furnished  building  is  cru- 
cial for  long-term  preservation  of  the  historic  furnishings.  Part  C 
contains  a  list  of  elements  destructive  to  historic  furnishings 
(Agents  of  Deterioration),  and  includes  recommended  levels  to  sustain 
a  proper  museum  environment. 

1.     Temperature/Humidity 

Temperature  and  humidity  readings  must  be  taken  on  a  regular,  long- 
term  basis  to  determine  seasonal  fluctuations.  A  recording  hygrother- 
mograph  should  be  used  continuously,  placed  on  each  floor,  and  out  of 
reach  of  curious  visitors,  but  in  rooms  containing  historic  furnish- 
ings. Weekly  charts  can  be  used  to  identify  problem  areas  and  justi- 
fy changes  to  the  existing  climate  control  equipment. 

The  house  appears  to  be  having  structural  problems  that  may  affect 
the  historic  furnishings.  Hygrothermographs  can  be  placed  in  problem 
areas  and  their  charts  can  be  used  to  detect  excess  moisture.  Inte- 
rior photographs  need  to  be  taken  of  the  problem  areas  and  then  used 


243 


as  a  basis  for  documenting  any  changes  that  are  occurring  internally 
with  the  structure.  Monitoring  must  be  done  by  the  park  staff  before 
structural  changes  can  be  made.  The  Regional  Historic  Architect 
should  be  consulted  and  should  work  with  the  staff  on  monitoring  and 
interpreting  the  results. 

An  average  internal  relative  humidity  of  55%  should  be  maintained 
year  round.  Recognizing  the  difficulty  of  such  precise  control  and 
taking  into  consideration  the  needs  of  a  historic  structure,  an  ac- 
ceptable alternative  is  35%  or  higher  relative  humidity  in  the  winter 
and  55%  or  lower  in  the  summer.  Such  a  broad  range  in  relative  humid- 
ity is  acceptable  only  if  the  change  from  the  wintertime  low  to  the 
summertime  high,  and  back  again,  is  slow  and  regular  and  the  daily 
relative  humidity  varies  less  than  2%. 

Ideally  the  inside  temperature  should  be  about  70°F  when  the  house 
is  open  to  the  public.  However,  an  acceptable  temperature  for  winter 
is  50°F,  and  for  summer  75°.  Above  70°F,  good  ventilation  is  needed 
to  minimize  pockets  of  stagnant  humid  air.  Rapid  changes  in  tempera- 
ture must  be  avoided;  daily  temperature  changes  should  not  exceed  5°. 
(Manual  for  Museums,  pp.  67-69;  Conserve  0  Grams  3/6,  3/7) 

2.     Light 

Controlling  both  visible  and  ultraviolet  light  will  prevent  fading 

and  weakening  of  fibers  in  organic  materials  (wood,  textiles,  paper, 


244 


leather).  The  curator  should  try  to  maintain  light  levels  of  150  lux 
(or  lower)  and  no  more  than  75  microwatts  per  lumen. 

Ultraviolet  light  filters  have  been  installed  on  all  windows  of 
furnished  rooms.   Window  shades  and  curtains  can  be  used  to  block 
direct  sunlight  from  entering  the  furnished  rooms.  The  curator  should 
develop  a  schedule  of  raising  and  lowering  the  appropriate  shades  in 
the  morning,  noon,  and  at  closing  time  to  limit  the  amount  of  sunlight 
in  the  rooms.  Light  readings  (both  lux  and  ultraviolet)  need  to  be 
taken  by  the  curator  on  a  yearly  basis  to  make  sure  the  levels  are 
within  the  recommended  range. 

Lighting  fixtures  in  these  rooms  should  be  used  only  when  necessary, 
and  turned  off  when  visitors  are  not  present.  Only  incandescent 
lighting  with  low  watt  bulbs  should  be  used. 
(Manual  for  Museums,  p.  69;  Conserve  0  Grams  3/3,  3/5) 

3.     Dust 

Dust   is   an   abrasive  which   can   attack  objects   directly.      Prevention    is 
better  than  treatment;   good  housekeeping  should  keep  dust  off  ob- 
jects.    Dust   covers,  made  from  washed,   unbleached  muslin,   should   be 
placed  over  the  furniture  when   the   house   is   closed   to   the  public   in 
the  off-season.     These  covers  will   minimize  dust   contact.     To   keep 
dust   levels   to  a  minimum,   windows   should   be  open  only  when   absolutely 
necessary  and  window  screens   should   be   used. 
(Manual   for  Museums,   pp.   69-70;   Conserve  0  Gram  7/8) 


245 


4.  Insects/Rodents 

Insect  and  rodent  inspections  should  occur  weekly,  and  appropriate 

actions  taken  where  needed.  To  prevent  or  to  minimize  insect  and 

rodent  activity,  food  and  drinks  should  not  be  allowed  in  the  house, 

and  it  should  be  cleaned  on  a  regular  basis  using  the  housekeeping 

schedule. 

(Manual  for  Museums,  pp.  65;  69-77;  Conserve  0  Grams  3/9,  3/10) 

5.  Fire 

The  house  needs  better  fire  detection  systems.  Smoke  and  heat  detec- 
tors are   located  throughout  the  house  but  are  not  placed  in  good  loca- 
tions within  the  rooms  to  quickly  detect  a  fire.  Fire  extinguishers 
(ABC)  are  located  throughout  the  house  and  are  to  be  used  until  the 
local  fire  department  arrives.  The  detection  system  is  hooked  up  with 
the  local  fire  department.  An  appraisal  of  the  fire  detection  and 
suppression  systems  needs  to  be  done  by  a  reputable  firm  in  conjunc- 
tion with  the  appropriate  Regional  office  staff  people  to  determine 
what  is  needed.  A  multidisciplinary  team  made  up  of  a  historical 
architect  and  a  museum  curator  should  be  involved  in  determining  what 
particular  types  of  systems  should  be  installed  to  minimize  any  nega- 
tive impact  en  historic  building  fabric  and  the  furnishings.  The  team 
should  consult  with  the  recommendations  in  NFPA  911,  "Protection  of 
Museums  and  Museum  Collections."  In  addition,  the  park  should  invite 
the  responsible  fire  department  to  visit  and  inspect  the  house,  to  be- 
come aware  of  particular  problems  which  should  be  considered  regarding 


246 


the  furnishings  and  the  historic  structure.  This  visit  should  take 
place  twice  a  year. 

The  Park  Ranger  should  prepare  an  emergency  action  plan  for  imple- 
mentation in  the  event  of  natural  disasters,  fire,  civil  unrest,  and 
bomb  threats.  It  should  delineate  responsibilities  of  park  employees 
to  minimize  danger  to  life  and  property.  The  staff  must  be  made  aware 
in  advance  of  actions  designed  to  save  the  more  valuable  museum 
objects.  A  plan  for  the  safe  evacuation  of  visitors  and  staff  must  be 
posted. 

Fire  drills  held  on  a  regular  basis  are  one  of  the  best  ways  to 
ensure  the  proper  response  to  an  emergency.  Thinking  out  responses 
ahead  of  time  makes  dealing  with  the  real  emergency  much  easier. 

Good  housekeeping  can  be  the  most  important  single  factor  in  the 
prevention  of  fire.  No  smoking  should  be  allowed  in  the  furnished 
sections  of  the  house. 
(Manual  for  Museums,  pp.  77;  292-297;  Conserve  0  Gram  2/4) 

6.     Security 

Protection  of  the  furnishings  is  provided  by  visitor  barriers,  mechan- 
ical intrusion  systems,  and  park  employees.  Park  employees  conduct- 
ing house  tours  meet  visitors  at  the  front  door  and  let  them  out  when 
the  tour  is  completed.  Outside  exits  should  remain  locked. 


247 


Tour  groups  should  never  exceed  fifteen  people,  except  during  spe- 
cial programs  when  more  employees  can  be  stationed  throughout  the 
house.  Self-guided  tours  should  be  avoided  and  visitors  should  not 
be  left  unattended. 

Security  devices  can  extend  the  eyes  and  ears  of  the  park  staff, 
especially  when  the  park  is  closed.  These  devices  depend  on  trans- 
mitting a  message  to  a  receiver  who  acts  with  speed  and  effective- 
ness. 

A  reputable  security  firm  should  prepare  a  security  appraisal,  rec- 
ommending additional  security  devices  if  needed.  The  security  sys- 
tems should  be  tested  periodically.  Local  authorities  should  be  made 
aware  of  the  existence  and  value  of  the  furnishings,  as  well  as  who 
to  notify  in  an  after-hour's  emergency. 

Park  employees  must  insist  that  visitors  do  not  touch  the  furnish- 
ings. Only  park  employees  with  curatorial  duties  should  handle  the 
historic  furnishings  and  then  as  little  as  possible,  and  only  with 
clean  hands.  Metal  objects  should  not  be  handled  without  clean  cot- 
ton gloves. 

Small  objects  can  be  protected  from  unncessary  handling  or  theft  by 
placing  them  out  of  reach  of  visitors,  or  securing  them  to  large  ob- 
jects. Reproduction  objects  should  be  used  in  place  of  historic  ob- 
jects if  proper  protection  cannot  be  provided  and  displayed  objects 
are  necessary.  However,  reproduction  objects  should  not  be  regarded 


248 


as  expendable  to  the  extent   that  they  are  given   absolutely  no  protec- 
tion or  care. 

Park  employees   should   conduct   walk-through  examinations   and   visual 
inventories   several    times   daily.     Missing   or  damaged   objects   should   be 
reported   immediately  to   the  Superintendent,    and   Incident  Reports 
(Form  10-434A)   completed. 

The  museum  records   system   is   an   additional    security  device.     An 
up-to-date   system  contains   object    locations   and  descriptions.      Loca- 
tion  files,   part   of  the   records   system,    should   be   established,   using 
salmon-colored  catalog   cards   (Form  10-254A).      Each   card   should   contain 
the  object   name,   location   (building,   room,   where   in   room)   a  brief  de- 
scription,  catalog   number,    and   accession   number.     These   cards   should 
be   kept   in   the   house   and   organized   by  room,   type  of  object   (chair, 
table,   painting,   etc.),    and   numerical    sequence  by  catalog  number. 

Photographs   showing  object   placement   should   be   available  for   each 
room.     Depending  on   size,   rooms  can   be   photographed   in   sections   of 
four  or  more,    and   labeled  A,    B,    C,   etc.     The  contents   of   closets   can 
be   included.     These   photographs   can  be   kept   on  Print   File  Cards   (Form 
10-30),    and   filed   by  room. 
(Manual   for  Museums,   pp.   77-82;    78-297;   Conserve  0  Gram  2/4) 

7.       Specific  Conservation  Considerations 

a.       Objects   should   never  be   placed   next   to,   or  on   top  of,   function- 
ing  heating   vents,   which  will    dry  out  wood,   textiles,    leathers,    and 


249 


paper  objects.  An  alternative  to  relocating  objects  is  to  close  off 
vents. 


b.  When  placing  objects  such  as  lamps,  books,  and  other  small 
objects  on  other  materials  (textiles,  finished  wood  surfaces,  paper, 
or  leather),  protective  barriers  should  be  placed  between  the  objects 
to  prevent  the  transfer  of  corrosion  or  chemicals,  and  to  evenly 
distribute  weight.  Suitable  protective  barriers  are:  acid-free 
cardboard;  museum  mat  board  (100%  rag);  or  polyethylene  foam. 

c.  Pages  of  open  books  should  be  turned  weekly  to  avoid  excess 
damage  to  any  two  pages  or  the  spine  of  the  book. 

d.  No  historic  papers  should  be  exhibited  merely  to  recreate  the 
historic  scene;  modern  copies  will  have  the  same  overall  effect. 
Copies  should  be  replaced  monthly  to  create  a  fresh  appearance. 

e.  Exposed  bookcases  can  be  covered  with  plexiglas  to  prevent 
theft  and  to  minimize  dust.  Using  UF3  plexiglas  will  also  reduce 
ultraviolet  light  hitting  the  books. 

f.  Garments  (including  hats  or  bonnets)  should  be  hung  on  either 
padded  wooden  hangers  or  padded  pegs.  Polyetheylene  foam  or  cotton 
batting,  covered  with  cotton  muslin,  forms  good  padding.  This  padding 
should  be  designed  to  hold  the  shape  of  the  object  and,  where  possi- 
ble, the  object  should  be  alternated  with  like  objects  for  display. 


250 


Only  very   strong  textiles  in  good  condition  can  bear  the  strain  of 
hanging. 

g.   All  framed  paper  materials  (such  as  prints  and  photographs) 

should  be  matted  with  100%  rag  board  and  framed  according  to  Conserve 

0  Gram  13/1.  Photographs  should  be  matted  with  100%  rag  board  that 
has  not  been  buffered. 

h.  Rugs  should  not  be  placed  directly  on  the  floor.  Wool  felt  or 
cotton  sheeting  should  be  used  as  a  barrier  between  the  rug  and  the 
floor. 

i.   Some  of  the  furniture,  leather  objects,  photographs,  and  books 
appear  to  need  conservation  treatment.  The  furnishings  should  be  sur- 
veyed by  conservators  to  determine  which  objects  need  conservation 
treatment.  The  curator  should  then  use  the  survey  recommendations  to 
develop  a  conservation  schedule. 

j.   Objects  stored  in  drawers,  cabinets,  and  closets  need  to  be 
removed  and  stored  correctly  in  the  museum  storage  area. 

B.   COLLECTION  MAINTENANCE  AND  HOUSEKEEPING  SCHEDULE 
The  Superintendent  is  responsible  for  the  collection;  all  collection 
maintenance,  as  well  as  cleaning  materials,  must  be  approved  by  her/ 
him.  The  curator  should  be  responsible  for  collection  maintenance  and 
should  first  receive  curatorial  training. 


251 


General  Rules  for  Handling  Objects 

1.  Be  aware  that  all  objects  should  be  treated  respectfully.  Haste 
makes  for  bumped,  scratched,  and  broken  objects;  always  schedule 
enough  time  to  complete  the  task.  Be  thorough,  but  remember  that  over 
cleaning  may  be  as  harmful  as  no  cleaning.  Be  gentle  rather  than 
enthusiastic. 

2.  Fingerprints  leave  deposits  of  dust,  water,  and  oils  where 
pockets  of  corrosion  develop  on  metal  objects.  Always  wear  clean 
white  gloves  when  handling  metal  objects  (silver,  brass,  copper, 
steel,  iron)  and  leather  objects.  When  the  gloves  become  soiled, 
rinse  them  in  Ivory--do  not  use  bleach.  Always  have  clean,  dry  hands 
when  handling  other  types  of  materials. 

3.  When  moving  any  object,  support  that  piece.  Carry  only  items 
that  can  rest  securely  in  both  hands,  and  carry  only  one  thing  at  a 
time.  Never  lift  anything  by  its  handle,  spout,  ears,  rim,  or  any 
other  protruding  part.  Support  it  from  below  at  the  base  and  at  the 
side.  Moving  large  pieces  of  furniture  requires  two  people  so  that 
mishandling  by  tugging,  pulling,  and  sliding  is  avoided.  When  sev- 
eral objects  are  moved  that  are  small  enough  to  fit  in  a  basket,  pad 
each  object  (along  with  the  basket).  Do  not  stack  objects  on  top  of 
each  other.  Do  not  allow  parts  of  objects  to  protrude  from  the  basket 
or  any  container)  while  in  transport.  The  loaded  basket  must  be 
light  enough  to  be  carried  easily. 


252 


4.  Moving  objects  displayed  above  fireplaces  on  high  shelves,  or 
over  tables  requires  two  people,  using  a  ladder.  One  person  should 
ascend  the  ladder,  and  using  both  hands,  carefully  transfer  the  object 
to  the  person  on  the  ground.  Lids  or  any  removable  parts  should  be 
firmly  affixed  or  removed  before  moving. 

5.  Carry  chairs  by  their  seat  rails;  large  upholstered  chairs 
should  be  carried  by  two  people.   In  most  cases,  tables  should  be  sup- 
ported by  the  skirt. 

6.  Plan  ahead.  Know  where  you  are  taking  an  object,  what  obsta- 
cles are  on  the  way,  and  have  the  pathway  cleared  and  padded  if  neces- 
sary. 

7.  If  something  breaks,  report  it  to  the  Superintendent.  Save  all 
fragments  and  keep  them  together. 

General  Recommendations  for  Using  This  Housekeeping  Schedule 
1.   Discretion  and  sensitivity  must  be  applied  in  following  this 
housekeeping  schedule.  Dusting  and  cleaning  museum  objects  should  be 
based  on  need  and  condition.  Cleaning  frequency  may  vary,  depending 
on  the  location  of  the  object  in  the  house  (if  it  is  close  to  an 
exterior  door),  the  season  of  the  yeart    and  the  level  of  visitation. 
Judgment  should  be  exercised  accordingly  by  the  person  with  curatorial 
duties.  The  less  handling  an  object  receives,  the  longer  it  will 
survive. 


253 


2.  When   dusting,    the  dust   should   be   removed—not   just   pushed 
around.     When   some  objects   are  dusted  with   a  dry  cloth   or   artist's 
brush,   use   a  vacuum  cleaner   to   pick   up   the   dust   that   is   removed   from 
the  object   into   the   air.     Vacuuming   is   the  best  method   of  dusting,   but 
a  variety  of   suctions   should   be   used,   depending   on   the   stability  and 
age  of  the  object  or  surface.     Some  vacuum  cleaners   are  now  made   so 
that  their  suction  can  be   lowered.     A  voltage  regulator  can   also  be 
used  to   lower  the  suction.     Portable  hand  vacs   are  useful    because  they 
have   a  lower   suction   than   regular   vacuum  cleaners.     A  plastic  mesh 
screen   should   also  be  used   on  fragile  surfaces   to  relieve   strain. 
Metal,  glass,    and  ceramic   objects  on  mantels,   high  shelves,   or  tables 
should  be  dusted   in   an   area  removed  from  the  furnished   area.     When 
clean,   they  can   be  returned   to   their   exhibit   location.     Be  yery  care- 
ful  when   handling  these  objects—this   requires   two   people. 

3.  During   seasons  with   low  visitation   levels,   the  daily,   weekly, 
and  monthly  tasks   can   be  done  with   less   frequency.     Biannual    tasks 
should   be  done   in   the   spring   and   at   the   beginning   of  winter.     Annual 
and   biennial    tasks   should   be  done  during  winter  months. 

Specific  Recommendations 

Ceramics   and  Glass 

Once   a  year,  ceramic   and   glass  objects   should  be  examined  to   see   if 
additional    cleaning   is   needed.     Clean   these  objects    according   to   the 
directions   in  Conserve  0   Gram  8/2.      Do   not   immerse   unglazed   portions 


254 


of  earthenware.  Instead,  wipe  these  sections  with  a  damp  cloth  or 
artist's  brush. 

Textiles 

1.  Vacuuming:  Fibers  should  be  tested  initially  for  stability. 
Turn  the  suction  down  to  the  lowest  level.  Carefully  vacuum  a  small 
unnoticeable  section  of  the  textile,  holding  the  plastic  mesh  screen 
over  the  textile  to  eliminate  strain.  Then  check  the  area  vacuumed 
for  loose  fiber  ends.   If  none  are  visible,  continue  vacuuming  the 
textile  using  the  brush  attachment.  Use  the  plastic  mesh  screen  on 
all  fragile  areas  to  eliminate  strain. 

Vacuum  upholstered  furniture  using  the  upholstery  attachment  and  the 
plastic  mesh  screen.  Place  the  screen  against  the  upholstery  and 
vacuum  over  it.  Work  dust  out  of  corners,  pleats,  and  tufts  with  a 
clean  brush  attachment. 

2.  Cleaning:  Reproduction  textiles  can  be  dry-cleaned  by  a  de- 
pendable dry  cleaner,  once  a  year  or  as  needed.  Historic  textiles 
should  be  cleaned  by  a  professional  textile  conservator.  If  there  is 
a  question  as  to  whether  a  textile  can  be  cleaned  by  the  curatorial 
staff,  consult  with  the  Regional  Curator  or  the  Textile  Conservator  in 
the  Division  of  Conservation. 

3.  Rugs:  Rugs  used  for  visitor  access  or  new  rugs  can  be  vacuumed 
and  cleaned  more  frequently  than  historic  rugs.  When  vacuuming  his- 


255 


toric  rugs  which  are  worn,  the  plastic  mesh  screen  should  be  used  as 
well  as  a  low  suction  to  relieve  strain. 


Metals 

1.  Brass,  copper,  and  silver  objects  should  be  polished  and  lac- 
quered to  avoid  polishing  e^/ery   year.  A  coat  of  lacquer  should  last 
a  long  time  (around  10  years);  inspect  objects  yearly  for  tarnished 
spots,  indicating  that  the  lacquer  needs  replacing. 

Lacquering  can  be  done  on  contract.  Contact  the  Regional  Curator 
for  assistance  with  this  project.  The  Metals  Conservator,  Division 
of  Conservation,  can  be  consulted  for  additional  assistance. 

2.  Iron  objects  can  develop  rust  and  corrosion.   If  this  occurs, 

the  room  environment  should  be  monitored  (using  a  hygrothermograph)  to 
see  if  the  humidity  is  too  high.  Contact  the  NARO  Conservator  for  as- 
sistance and  information  on  further  treatment. 

3.  Cast  and  wrought  iron  fireplace  equipment  can  be  polished  with 
stove  blacking. 

4.  Excessively  dirty  metal  objects  can  be  washed.  Do  not  wash 
objects  with  sections  made  of  other  materials,  such  as  bone  or  wood. 
If  dusting  is  done  regularly,  washing  should  not  be  necessary.  Wash- 
ing should  never  occur  on  a  regular  basis. 

Washing  Procedure:  Wash  in  warm  water  and  non-ionic  detergent; 
rinse  in  clear  water  and  dry  completely  with  a  soft  clean  cloth. 


256 


5.   Pewter  should  be  polished  only  when  absolutely  necessary;  a 
light  coat  of  microcrystal 1 ine  wax  is  usually  sufficient.  Wash  only 
if  the  object  is  very  dirty;  this  dirt  buildup  should  not  occur  if  the 
objects  are  dusted  regularly.  Do  not  wash  on  a  scheduled  basis. 

Washing  Procedure:  Wash  in  denatured  alcohol;  rinse  well  in  dis- 
tilled water  and  dry  with  a  clean  cloth. 

Fireplace 

Cleaning  Procedure: 

Equipment:    Soft,  clean  cloths,  pail  of  clear  water,  gloves, 
sponge. 

Procedure:    Vacuum  clean.  Damp  wipe  the  hearth  with  a  sponge 
dipped  in  clear  water.  Dry  with  a  soft,  clean 
cloth. 

For  more  detailed  information  on  fireplaces,  see  Manual  for  Museums, 

pp.  241-244. 

Maintenance  Staff  Projects  Accomplished  in  Consultation  with 
Superintendent 

Floors 

Monthly  Cleaning:  The  wood  floor  can  be  damp  mopped  and  buffed. 
Buffing  removes  lightly  imbedded  dirt  and  restores  the  waxy  gloss. 
When  dirt  has  been  moderately  ground  into  the  wax,  buffing  should 
fol low  damp  mopping. 


257 


Cleaning  Procedure 


Damp  Mopping:    Equipment—Clean   string  mop,  mop  bucket   (avoid 
bucket   that   shows   signs   of  rusting),    and 
wringer. 


Procedure:  Fill    bucket   half  full    with   cold   water.     Vacuum 

thoroughly  before  mopping.     Wet  mop   in   cold  water 
and   wring   it   nearly  dry.      Mop  floor   in   long   con- 
tinuous  side-to-side   strokes.     Reverse  direction 
every  fourth   stroke.     Rinse   and   wring  mop  fre- 
quently.    Change  water   as   soon   as   it   gets   dirty. 
Try  to   avoid   slapping   strands  of  mop   against 
furniture,   rugs,   or   baseboards.     When   finished, 
wash   mop,   bucket,    and   wringer. 


Buffing:  Equipment—Electric   floor   polisher,   clean 

buffing   brushes,   or   pads. 

Procedure:  Vacuum  floor  thoroughly  first.     Attach   buffer 

to  floor   polisher   head.      Guide  polisher  from  side 
to   side,    in   parallel    paths,   until    entire  floor   is 
buffed.     Avoid   hitting  furnishings   or  baseboards 
with  polishing  machine.     Clean   pads  or  brushes 
when  finished. 

For  more  detailed    information  on  caring  for  floors,    see   the  Manual   for 

Museums,   pp.   222-231. 

Windows 

Biannual   Cleaning:     The  windows   should   be  washed    inside   and   out.     No 

liquid   should   run  onto  the  wooden   framework.     Care  must   be   taken   to 

not  damage  the   ultraviolet   filtering  materials  on   the   interior   of  the 

glass. 

Cleaning  Procedure: 

Equipment:    Two  people,  ladder,  chamois,  pail,  sponge, 
cleaning  solution  (Conserve  0  Gram  8/2). 


258 


Procedure:      Dust  window  panes  and  surrounding  framework. 

Dampen  sponge  in  cleaning  solution  and  use  over- 
lapping strokes  to  wash  each  pane.  Remove  dirty 
water  from  the  pane  with  chamois.  Change  water 
when  it  becomes  dirty. 

For  more  detailed  information  on  cleaning  windows,  see  Manual  for 

Museums,  pp.  238-239. 

Ventilation  System 

Biannual  Cleaning:  Contact  the  maintenance  staff  and  request  them 

to  remove  the  floor  registers  and  vacuum  the  outlets.  The  heating 

equipment  should  also  be  cleaned;  any  filters  should  be  cleaned  and 

replaced. 

Housekeeping  Schedule 

Daily 

1.  Vacuum  floors  and  baseboards.  Do  first  floor  one  day,  second 
floor  the  next  day. 

2.  Dust  stairway  balusters  and  railing  with  a  clean  cotton  cloth 
sprayed  with  Endust™.  Alternate  floors  as  above. 

3.     Damp  wipe  surfaces  extensively  handled  by  visitors  (room 
barriers,  entrance  and  exit  door  handles,  and  stair  railings). 

Weekly 

1.     Dust  wood  furniture  with  a  clean  cloth  sprayed  with  Endust™. 
Dust  all  parts  of  the  piece  including  the  out-of-the-way  places.  Use 
a  soft  cotton  swab  if  necessary  (Conserve  0  Gram  7/8). 


259 


2.  Dust   ceramic,   glass,    paper,    and   other   small  objects   on  display 
using   a  clean  dry  cotton   cloth.      Use   an   artist's  brush   on    intricately 
decorated   objects   and   art   objects.     Do   the  first  floor   one  week,   the 
second  floor  the  next  week. 

3.  Vacuum   leather  materials,   books,    and    lamp  shades,   using   a  gentle 
suction  through   the  plastic   screen.     Wear   clean   cotton   gloves.      Do   al- 
ternate floors   as   above. 

4.  Dust   metal    objects,   using   a  clean,   dry  cotton   cloth.     Always 
wear  clean  cotton  gloves.     Do  alternate  floors   as   above. 

5.  Clean   soiled   gloves    in   Ivory™;   rinse   and   dry. 

6.  Vacuum  hearths,  mantels,   and  fireplaces. 

7.  Change  vacuum  bag. 

8.  Check  for  evidence  of  insects  and  rodents  (see  Manual  for 
Museums,  pp.  71-77  and  Conserve  0  Gram  3/10).  Renew  traps  as 
needed. 

Monthly 

1.  Vacuum  window  frames,    shades,   reproduction   curtains,    and    light- 
ing fixtures. 

2.  Clean   plexiglas,   using   a  non-static   cleanser   and   a  clean,   dry 
cotton   cloth. 


260 


3.  Vacuum  upholstery  on  historic  furniture,  using  gentle  suction 
and  a  clean  upholstery  attachment.  Fragile  areas  should  be  vacuumed 
through  a  plastic  mesh  screen  to  decrease  strain.  Always  vacuum  in 
the  direction  of  the  nap  if  the  material  has  a  nap. 

4.  Vacuum  Oriental  carpets  and  historic  rugs,  using  the  upholstery 
attachment  in  the  direction  of  the  nap  and  a  plastic  screen  where 
necessary. 

5.  Dust  picture  frames,  using  a  lens  brush. 

6.  Glass  on  mirrors  and  pictures  may  be  damp  wiped  (if  needed), 
using  a  sponge  dipped  in  glass  cleaner  (Conserve  0  Gram  8/2)  and 
squeezed  almost  dry.  Do  not  let  the  moisture  get  on  the  frame  or 
under  the  glass. 

7.  Replace  scattered  replica  paper  with  fresh  sheets. 

8.  Refold  folded  textiles  along  different  lines  to  reduce 
stress. 

9.  Spot  clean  walls  with  a  clean,  water  damp  cloth,  and  dry. 

10.  Vacuum  tops  of  doors,  bookcases,  and  other  ledges  in  reach  of 
the  floor. 

11.  Damp  mop/buff  the  wood  floors. 


261 


12.    Examine  furnishings  to  determine  if  active  deterioration  is 
occurring  and  if  specialized  conservation  treatment  is  needed. 

Semi-Annual 


1.  Vacuum  ceiling  and  other  high  wall  areas  requiring  ladders. 

2.  Wash  and  dry  windows. 

3.  Vacuum  around  radiators  and  check  for  leaks. 

4.  Clean  or  replace  filters  in  the  heating  system;  clean  heating 
equipment. 

Annual 


1.  Check  metal  objects  for  corrosion,  rust,  or  tarnish;  treat  if 
necessary. 

2.  Wash  and  dry  ceramic  and  glass  objects,  if  necessary  (Conserve 
0  Gram  8/2). 

3.  Clean  woodwork  by  wiping  with  a  clean,  damp  cloth  and  dry  im- 
mediately. 

4.  Clean  hearth,  mantel,  and  fireplace  (only  if  necessary). 

5.  Take  up  Oriental  carpets  and  historic  rugs  and  clean  be- 
neath. 


262 


6.    Take  objects  out  of  cupboards  and  bookcases;  dust  objects  as 
well  as  shelves,  using  a  clean  cotton  cloth  or  vacuum  cleaner. 

Biannual 


1.  Clean  and  wax  finished  wood  furniture  (not  gilt  or  painted 
furniture)  (Conserve  0  Grams  7/2,  7/3). 

2.  Damp  wipe  and  dry  painted  wood  and  raw  wood  objects,  using  a 
clean  cloth  with  water  (Conserve  0  Gram  7/2). 

3.  Clean  exposed  wood  floors  by  stripping,  waxing,  and  buffing 
(Conserve  0  Gram  7/4) . 

C.     AGENTS  OF  DETERIORATION 

Proper  care  of  a  museum  collection  consists  of  reducing  the  rate  of 
deterioration  to  a  minimum  by  housing  the  collection  in  a  safe  envi- 
ronment. A  safe  environment  will  prolong  the  life  of  an  object  and 
minimize  conservation  treatment.  Prevention  is  always  better  than 
treatment. 

The  Manual  for  Museums  includes  a  chapter  on  caring  for  a  collec- 
tion. The  sections  on  agents  of  deterioration  (pp.  67-82)  and  climate 
control  (pp.  83-91)  should  be  read  carefully.  Another  good  source  to 
become  familiar  with  is  The  Museum  Environment  by  Garry  Thomson.   It 
contains  useful  information  on  lighting,  humidity,  and  air  pollu- 
tion. 


263 


Damaging  conditions  are: 

Too  much  or  too  little  humidity 

40%  -  60%  is  an  ideal  range;  metals  do  best  at  40%  or  below.  At  very 
low  levels,  organic  materials  dry  out  and  become  brittle;  at  high 
levels,  mold  will  develop  and  metal  will  begin  to  corrode.  Manual 
for  Museums,  pp.  67-68,  83-89. 

Too  much  or  too  little  temperature 

60°-70°F  is  the  recommended  range.  The  greatest  danger  lies  in  the 
variation  of  temperatures.  Rapid  and  wide  variations  can  cause  dan- 
gerous expansion  and  contraction  of  some  materials.  Manual  for  Muse- 
ums,  pp.  68-69,  83-86,  89. 


Too  Much  Light  * 

50  Lux    (5  Footcandles) 


Textiles,  watercolors,   prints   and 
drawings,    paper,   wallpapers,   dyed 
leather,  most   natural    history  objects 
(botanical    specimens,    fur,    feathers, 
etc.). 


150  Lux   (15  Footcandles) 


Oil    and   tempera  paintings,    undyed 
leather,    horn,   bone,    ivory,    and   ori 
ental    lacquer. 


300   Lux    (30  Footcandles) 


Other  objects. 


*Garry  Thomson,  The  Museum  Environment   (London:     Butterworths, 
1978),   23. 


264 


Ultraviolet  light  should  be  filtered  out.  The  length  of  time  an 
object  is  exposed  to  light  is  equally  important.  Use  light  only  when 
necessary.  Manual  for  Museums,  pp.  69,  86,  90-91. 

Chemical  Air  Pollution 

Common  air  pollutants  include  industrial  fumes,  motor  vehicle 
exhausts,  and  salts  from  the  ocean.  Materials  such  as  unseasoned 
woods,  paints  containing  lithopone  (in  the  pigment),  unpainted 
hardboard,  acidic  papers  and  plastics  also  release  harmful  vapors. 
These  materials  should  be  avoided  in  construction  of  exhibit  cases  or 
storage  equipment.  Manual  for  Museums,  pp.  70,  91. 

Dust 

It  acts  as  an  abrasive,  provides  surface  for  moisture  condensation  and 
will  soil  the  surface  of  objects.  Once  an  object  is  covered  with 
dust,  the  removal  process  can  accelerate  wear  and  increase  the  possi- 
bility of  physical  damage.  Manual  for  Museums,  pp.  69-70,  91. 

Mold  (Also  called  Mildew) 

This  growth  probably  destroys  more  objects  than  anything  else. 
Growth  is  more  likely  and  noticeable  on  organic  objects  in  an  atmos- 
phere of  more  than  65%  RH  and  60°F.  Look  for  velvety  patches  or 
areas  of  discoloration.  Avoid  warm,  damp  environments.  Manual  for 
Museums,  pp.  70-71,  39. 


265 


Insects 

The  most  common  insects  to  watch  are  powder-post  beetles,  clothes 
moths,  silverfish,  dermestid  beetles,  and  cockroaches.  Ther  damage 
is  rapid  and  irreversible.  Manual  for  Museums,  pp.  71-76. 

Rodents 

In   a  very  short   time  these   animals   can   destroy  a  collection   by  their 
eating   and   nest-making.     Watch   for  droppings,    signs   of   gnawing,    and 
rodents   themselves. 

Fire 

A  fire  can  wipe  out   an   entire  collection   \/ery  quickly.      Keep  flamma- 
bles  in  special    fire-resistant  containers.     Work  out  a  fire  emergency 
action   plan  with   staff   and    local    fire-fighting  organizations.     Manual 
for  Museums,   p.   77. 

Humans 

Human  hazards  to  the  collection  are  careless  handling  (by  visitors  and 
staff),  vandalism,  and  theft.  The  security  of  the  collection  depends 
primarily  upon  the  staff.  Manual  for  Museums,  pp.  77-82. 

D.   SOURCES  OF  ASSISTANCE 

Persons  responsible  for  the  care  and  protection  of  museum  objects 
should  be  familiar  with  Ralph  Lewis'  Manual  for  Museums  (National  Park 
Service,  GPO,  1976),  the  Conserve  0  Gram  series,  and  the  NPS  Museum 


266 


Handbook.  Section  in  the  Manual  for  Museums  which  are  particularly 
useful  for  implementing  these  recommendations  are  Chapter  4,  "Caring 
for  a  Collection,"  pp.  61-112;  Chapter  11,  "Housekeeping,"  pp.  204- 
259;  and  Chapter  12,  "Protection,"  pp.  260-298. 

Other  useful  publications: 

Committee  on  Libraries,  Museums,  and  Historic  Buildings.  Protection 
of  Museums  and  Museum  Collections  1980.  NFPA  911,  Boston:  Na- 
tional Fire  Protection  Association,  Inc.,  1980,  one  of  the  best 
sources  on  fire  protection  and  prevention,  specifically  written 
for  museums. 

Edwards,  Stephen  R.,  Bruce  M.  Bell,  and  Mary  Elizabeth  King.  Pest 
Control  In  Museums:  A  Status  Report.  Lawrence,  Kansas: 
Association  of  Systematic  Collections,  1980,  a  good  guide  to 
pesticides,  their  use  in  museums,  and  common  insect  pests. 

Thomson,  Garry.  The  Museum  Environment.  London:  Butterworths, 

1978.  An  excellent  source  of  information  on  light,  humidity, 
and  air  pollution. 

Useful  audiovisual  programs  are: 

"Housekeeping  Techniques  for  the  Historic  House,"  "Museum  Fire  Secu- 
rity," and  "Site  Security."  These  programs  are  produced  by  the 
American  Association  of  State  and  Local  History. 


267 


Additionally,  the  Regional  Curator,  North  Atlantic  Regional  Office, 
and  the  Curatorial  Services  Division,  WASO,  can  provide  assistance 
and  further  information  for  managing  the  museum  collection. 


268 


BIBLIOGRAPHY 


SOURCES  RELATING  TO  OCCUPANTS 
MMNHP  Files. 


Bassin,  Maurice.  Hawthorne's  Son.  Columbus,  Ohio:  Ohio  State  Uni 
versity  Press ,  1970. 


Bonstelle,  J.  and  M.  deForest,  eds.,  Little  Women,  Letters  from  the 
House  of  Alcott. 


Boorstin,  Daniel  J.  The  Americans,  III,  The  Democratic  Experience. 


New  York:  Vintage  Books,  1974, 


Capen,  Oliver  Bronson.  "Country  Homes  of  Famous  Americans,"  Country 
Life  in  America.   (July,  1904):  282. 


Carroll,  Orville  W.  The  Wayside:  Historic  Structure  Report,  Part  II 
Architectural  Data  Section.  Washington,  D.C.:  Division  of 
Historic  Architecture,  Office  of  Archeology  and  Historic 
Preservation,  1968. 


Cheney,  Edna  D.  Louisa  May  Alcott:  Her  Life,  Letters  and  Journals 
(1930,  edTT 


Clark,  M.L.  The  Alcotts  in  Harvard.  J.C.L.  Clark,  1902. 


Cowley,  Malcolm,  ed.,  The  Portable  Hawthorne.  New  York:  Viking, 
1948. 


Derry,  Robert.  "Harriett  Lothrop  Chronology,"  Unpublished.  MMNHP 


269 


Fields  Collection,  Boston  Public  Library. 


Gowing,  Clara.  The  Alcotts  As  I  Knew  Them.  Boston:  The  CM.  Clark 
Publishing  Co.,  1909. 


Hawthorne,  Edith  Garrigues,  ed.  The  Memoirs  of  Julian  Hawthorne. 
New  York:  MacMillan,  1938. 


Hawthorne,  Julian.  Nathaniel  Hawthorne  and  His  Wife.  New  York: 
Anchor  Books,  1968,  Reprint  of  1884  ed. 


Hawthorne,  Nathaniel.  Tanglewood  Tales.  Boston,  Houghton  Mifflin, 
1900. 


Higginson,  ed.  The  Hawthorne  Centenary  Celebration  at  the  Wayside, 
Concord,  Massachusetts,  July  4-7,  1904.  Boston:  1905. 


Howells,  William  Dean.  Literary  Friends  and  Acquaintances. 


Interpretive  Prospectus:  Minute  Man  National  Historic  Park,  Massa- 
chusetts." U.S.  Department  of  the  Interior:  National  Park 
Service,  1971. 


Kesselring,  Marion  L.  Hawthorne's  Reading,  1828-50.  New  York:  New 
York  Public  Library,  1949. 


Kimball,  Fiske.  Domestic  Architecture  of  the  American  Colonies  and 

of  the  Early  Republic.  New  York:  Charles  Scribner's  Sons, 

W&-. 


Lothrop  Letters,  Boston  Public  Library. 

"Daniel  Lothrop,"  Dictionary  of  American  Biography, 


270 


Margaret  Mulford  Lothrop,  The  Wayside:  Home  of  Authors.  New  York 
American  Book  Company,  1968. 


Mann  Correspondence,  Massachusetts  Historical  Society. 


Ronsheim,  Robert  D.  The  Wayside:  Historic  Structure  Report,  Historic 
Data  Section"!  National  Park  Service:  Division  of  History, 
Office  of  Archeology  and  Historic  Preservation,  1968. 


Sanborn,  Frank  B.  and  William  T.  Harris.  Amos  Bronson  Alcott,  His 
Life  and  Philosophy.  New  York:  Biblo  and  Tanner,  1965. 


Saxton,  Martha.  Louisa  May,  A  Modern  Biography  of  Louisa  May  Alcott 
Boston:  Houghton  Mifflin,  1977. 


Shepard,  Odell .  Pedlar's  Progress,  The  Life  of  Bronson  Alcott.  New 
York:  Greenwood  Press,  1968. 


Stewart,  Randall.  Nathaniel  Hawthorne:  A  Biography.  New  Haven: 
Yale  University  Press,  1948. 


.  "More  Books,"  The  Bulletin  of  the  Boston  Public 


Library  (October,  1944):  308. 


Tharp,  Louise  Hall.  The  Peabody  Sisters  of  Salem.  Boston:  Little, 
Brown,  &  Co.,  1950. 


Ticknor,  Caroline.  May  Alcott,  A  Memoir.  Boston,  1928. 


Hawthorne  and  His  Publisher.  Boston:  Houghton 


Mifflin  &  Co.,  1913. 


271 


Toogood,  Anna  Coxe.  The  Wayside:  Historic  Grounds  Report.  Washing- 
ton, D.C.:  National  Park  Service,  Eastern  Service  Center, 
1970. 


Turner,  Arlin.  Nathaniel  Hawthorne,  1979, 


Wolfe,  Theodore.  Literary  Shrines.  Philadelphia,  J.B.  Lippencott 
Co.,  1896. 


SOURCES  RELATING  TO  FURNISHINGS 


The  main  source  used  for  this  report  were  MML's  notes  at  MMNHP.  Other 
sources  included: 


Conley,  Katharine.  "How  the  Chintz  Decorator  Transformed  Turn  of  the 
Century  Rooms,"  Old  House  Journal  (March,  1981):  66-67. 


Furn,  Dallas.  "Japan  At  The  Centennial,"  Nineteenth  Century,  2 
(Autumn,  1976):  33-40. 


Marzio,  Peter  C.  The  Democratic  Art:  Pictures  for  a  Nineteenth 

Century  America.  Boston:  David  R.  Jodine  in  association 
with  the  Amon  Carter  Museum  of  Western  Art,  Fort  Worth, 
1979. 


Sears,  Roebuck  &  Co.  Catalog  1903,  1904.  Reprint,  Dover  Publishers, 
T969T 


Stickley  Craftsman  Furniture  Catalogs,  Reprint,  Dover  edition,  1979. 


272 


ILLUSTRATIONS 


273 


Illustration  1. 

Harriet  M.  Lothrop  and  Daniel  Lothrop  holding  their 
daughter  Margaret  M.  Lothrop  with  Elizabeth  Palmer 
Peabody  (Mrs.  Hawthorne's  sister)  on  the  west  lawn 
of  the  Wayside  property.  Photographer,  A.W. 
Hosmer,  c.  1886.  Date  is  ascribed  on  the  basis  of 
Miss  Lothrop' s  appearance.  She  was  born  in  1884. 

Source:  MMNHP. 


274 


Illustration  2. 

Reception  for  Mrs.  John  A.  Logan.  Photo  attrib- 
uted to  A.W.  Hosmer,  August,  1890. 

Source:  MMNHP. 


276 


Illustration  3. 

Harriett  M.  Lothrop,  Margaret  Mulford  Lothrop 
(lower  left),  and  unidentified  companion.  Taken 
about  1897-1890  in  the  Bay  Window  Room.  Negative 
BW9. 

Source: 


278 


w 


wmwmmmmmmm 


Illustration  4. 
Bay  Window  Room,  1922.  Negative  BW2 
Source:  MMNHP. 


280 


L\< 


W 


X 


X 


tfi.0 


«*    «*. 


^B*?v 


v  ^ 


£*# 


Illustration  5. 
Bay  Window  Room,  1937.  Negative  BW5 
Source:  MMNHP. 


282 


Illustration  6, 
Lower  Front  Hall. 
Source:  MMNHP. 


284 


Illustration  7. 
Polly  Pepper  when  she  believed  she  was  going  blind 
Source:   MMNHP. 


286 


*i 


-/ 


A, 


Illustration  8. 

Dining  Room  as  it  appeared  in  1922.  Negative 
DR4bn. 


Source: 


288 


Illustration  9. 

Dining  Room  in  1888.  Published  by  Frank  Cousins' 
Bee-Hive.  Negative  DR2. 

Source:  MMNHP. 


290 


Illustration  10, 
Lower  Front  Hall,  looking  south. 
Source:  MMNHP. 


292 


Illustration  11. 
Lower  Front  Hall,  looking  north. 
Source:  MMNHP. 


294 


Illustration  12. 

Mrs.  Hawthorne's  Parlor,  c.  1888-1893.  Negative 
HP1N. 


Source: 


296 


Illustration  13. 

Mrs.  Hawthorne's  Parlor,  facing  north,  c.  1970, 
Negative  HP. 

Source:  MMNHP. 


298 


Illustration  14. 

Old  Room  showing  "Norwegian  Cabinet"  (on  wall 
which  Mrs.  Lothrop  brought  back  from  Norway, 
gave  the  cabinet  to  her  cousin,  Mr.  Griffin. 

Source:  MMNHP. 


300 


Illustration  15. 

Sitting  Room  as   it   appeared  in  1898.     Date   is   based 
on  wall    calendars   and  on  MML's   appearance   in  her 
photograph  on  the  piano. 

Source:     MMNHP. 


302 


Illustration  16. 
Guest  Room  or  Terrace  Room,  c.  1922 
Source:  MMNHP. 


304 


Illustration  17. 
Old  Room,  taken  in  1898.  Negative  OR, 
Source:  MMNHP. 


306 


Illustration  18. 

Piazza  Room  as  it  appears  today  looking  north, 
c.  1970. 

Source:  MMNHP. 


308 


Illustration  19. 

Piazza  Room,  looking  south,  as  it  appears  today, 
c.  1970. 


Source: 


P. 


310 


■BhHBH 


Illustration  20. 

Sitting  Room,  published  in  Frank  Cousins' 
Bee-Hive,  Salem,  1888. 

Source:  MMNHP. 


312 


Illustration  21. 

Sitting  Room,  probably  around  1922.  Negative 
SR-4. 


Source: 


P. 


314 


Illustration  22. 

Sitting  Room,  looking  north,  as  it  appears  today, 
c.  1970. 


Source: 


316 


Illustration  23. 

Dining  Room,  looking  northwest,  believed  taken  in 
1922.  Photograph  probably  by  Shepherd.  Negative 
DR-3. 

Source:  MMNHP. 


318 


Illustration  24. 

Terrace  Room  or  Guest  Room  as  it  looks  today. 
Taken  about  1970. 

Source:  MMNHP. 


320 


▲ 


J5   * 


Illustration  25. 
Large  Bathroom,  as  it  appears  today,  c.  1970, 
Source:  MMNHP. 


322 


Illustration  26. 

Maid's   Room,    looking   northeast,    as    it   appears 
today,   c.   1970. 

Source:     MMNHP. 


324 


Illustration  27. 

Maid's  Room,    looking  northwest,    as   it   appears 
today,   c.   1970. 

Source:      MMNHP. 


326 


Illustration  28. 

Tower  Study,  photographed  in  1898.  Negative 
TS19n. 


Source: 


328 


Illustration  29. 

Tower  Study,  southeast  corner,  photographed  in 
1902.  Negative  TS19n. 

Source:  MMNHP. 


330 


Illustration  30. 

Tower  Study,  photographed  about  1928.  Neaative 
TSlOn. 

Source:  MMNHP. 


332 


Illustration  31. 

Tower  Study,  photographed  about  1900.  Negative 
TS2. 

Source:  MMNHP. 


334 


Illustration  32. 

Stair  Tower  of  Tower  Study,  probably  c  1922 
Negative  TSllan. 

Source:  MMNHP. 


336 


r~ 


Illustration  33, 
Tower  Study,  c.  1904. 
Source:  MMNHP. 


338 


Illustration  34. 

Una  Hawthorne's  Room,  furnished  as  the  Lothrops' 
guest  room.  Frank  Cousins'  Bee-Hive,  after 
October  1888,  datable  by  the  heat  register  in- 
stalled at  that  time.  Negative  URlb. 

Source:  MMNHP. 


340 


Illustration  35. 

Una's  Room,    east  wall.     Photo  believed  to  date 
post-1924.      Negative  UR2. 

Source:     MMNHP. 


342 


Illustration  36. 

Upper  Front  Hall,  showing  stairway  to  Hawthorne 
Tower  and  Lothrop  &  Co.  clock  over  the  Northwest 
Passage  doorway.  Negative  UH1. 

Source:  MMNHP. 


344 


Illustration  37. 

West  Chamber  or  Hawthorne  Bedroom,  as  it  appears 
today,  c.  1970. 

Source:  MMNHP. 


346 


Illustration  38. 
Lower  Front  Hall  with  view  of  stair  carpet 
Source:  MMNHP. 


348 


Illustration  39. 
Kitchen,  view  north,  as  it  appears  today,  c.  1970. 
Source:  MMNHP. 


350 


«to 


Illustration  40, 
Kitchen,  view  south,  c.  1970. 
Source:  MMNHP. 


352 


Illustration  41. 
Sitting  Room,  facing  fireplace.  Negative  SR4bn 
Source:  MMNHP. 


354 


Illustration  42. 

West  Chamber  or  Hawthorne  Bedroom,  facing  east 
Negative  HB1. 

Source:  MMNHP. 


356 


Illustration  43. 
Sitting  Room,  facing  fireplace.  Negative  SR2 
Source:  MMNHP. 


358 


i^S^-  m 

< 

K 


I. 


Illustration  44. 

Dining  Room,  with  pine  boughs  and  dried  corn  on 
mantel.  Negative  DR2. 

Source:  MMNHP. 


360 


II  lustration  45, 
East  Chamber. 
Source:  MMNHP. 


362 


Illustration  46. 
Sitting  Room,  showing  HML's  writing  desk,  c.  1970, 
Source:  MMNHP. 


364 


Illustration  47, 
Large  Bathroom. 
Source:  MMNHP. 


366 


Illustration  48. 
Chair  from  Old  Room,  Arts  and  Crafts  style 
Source:  MMNHP. 


368 


Illustration  49. 

Windsor  chair  with  "Ephraim  Wales  Bull"  written 
on  the  crest  rail.  This  was  supposed  to  have 
belonged  to  Bull . 

Source:  MMNHP. 


370 


Illustration  50. 

Morris  chair  that  is  supposed  to  have  belonged  to 
Hawthorne. 

Source:  MMNHP. 


372 


Illustration  51. 

HML's   "cathedral   chair"  with   her  needlework   on  the 
back   and   seat. 

Source:     MMNHP. 


374 


Illustration  52. 

Washstand,   Una's  Room.     Part  of  a  bedroom  suite 
that   belonged   to  DL. 

Source:     MMNHP. 


376 


Illustration  53. 

Hawthorne  washstand,  Salem  c.  1820-1840.  This 
matches  a  Salem  chest  of  drawers  in  the  Concord 
Historical  Society. 

Source:  MMiMHP. 


378 


Illustration  54, 
Bureau,  Una's  Room,  c.  1970. 
Source:  MMNHP. 


380 


Illustration  55. 

Daniel  Lothrop  bust,  bronze,  by  S.  Kitson, 
Hawthorne  Parlor. 

Source:  MMNHP. 


382 


Illustration  56, 
Framed  rubbing.  Negative  3. 
Source:  MMNHP. 


384 


Illustration  57, 
"Whittier  and  the  Children." 
Source:  MMNHP. 


386 


Illustration  58, 
Print  of  "Columbus." 
Source:  MMNHP. 


388 


Illustration  59, 
HML's  Wagner  display. 
Source:  MMNHP. 


390 


Illustration  60. 

Illustration  by  Hermann  Heyer  of  Polly  Pepper  when 
she  believed  that  she  was  going  blind. 

Source:  MMNHP. 


392 


Illustration  61 
Bed,  Una's  Room,  c.  1970. 
Source:  MMNHP. 


394 


'Jin  W-Zm  T^^P 

*V*»  ^mf®  *&* 

j*»  ^Jft*  ▼£**  vlf*  ^*3»  V, 

f1^ 


Illustration  62. 
Barn,  site  of  HML's  pageants,  c.  1965 
Source:  MMNHP. 


396 


FLOORPLANS  AND  ELEVATIONS 


398 


HI 


i    r 


id 


I     J     i     I 


— >- 


w 


© 


□> 


an  izzm 


Hino? 


» 


LE 


399 


SCAL±    fa"* I 


© 

2=2 


iP" 


[HUB 


2Hc±d 


/^ORTH 


B 


l££ 


e>&- 


D 


paczr 
□  CD  CD 


fekil 

i 

! 

1 

a 

_. . 

I       II    1!           ! 

an 

n 

a 


■eO 


-51 


fyJ.no9 


Te^a 


FlRSTFLOOPv 


400 


SCALE   te"= 


HO1 


mm 


/vort* 


81 


i 

I;       1  CEj 


^ 


h 


SIP 


^ 


_^3 


£k 


c± 


A 

V 


p 


0 

^ 


■Of' 


_--J 


hij.no§ 


rif\5TFLOOp, 


SCALE     '/&"=/' 


401 


^ 


"SJ 


3: 


^a 


M1009 


jLOWER  FROfJT  WAlL 

r/ aSt  floor 


402 


SCAL£"=  V=/ 


/\JOR7"M 


OT 


. '>  .  I ' 


TO      03L 

■  i1 

a?       oi 


\!2     f — 


a 


HJ.no9 


a 


/V'Po.  A/AWTHOR,V£5  PAR  LOP, 

FIRoT  FLOOR 


403 


6CALE    ^"  = 


uiH  =  r/ 


R^ 


001* 


n?  TT^IU 


!   ^ 


A/ORTW 


/VJ-nog 


1 11'  Xm 


Dtp 
□D 


"I 


OLD  AOOAA 
FiR5T  Fz_ooA 


404 


SCALE*>6"=/' 


~E 


O  ■ ■»  a ' 


Q 


k. 


/VORTH 


pGriaj 


fvxnos 


F/P.ST  Ft-OOK 


SCALE     ^"-/ 


405 


oo  a 


=p 


.^4l' £ 


/iORTtf 


DO 


O 


I] 


AX1 


3 

0 


?«£& 


S    iH 


//-incc? 


•n r 


fcrfe 


M — r'4— ^  -V-i U-J'  —Hi 


■CALE     'A" ---I 


■a  <•  -  ,  / 


406 


liilili 


~Z^" 


=A 


TS 


JTVry 


0-0i£7- 


/\jQP,-r^ 


<£=£ 


a —    r  l°!°iti°i 


Ji£_ 


ni r 

r-i  I  i 


uJ 


bTX^ 


HJ.no  & 


6CAL£:    >6"- 


407 


A/QRtH 


f/ino9 


408 


A/OflTn 


6) 


#5 

I'lMjl 

1 

a/jlooS* 


6ECO/VD  FLOOR 


SCALE    ^"=v 


«»,' 


409 


wwe 


k^n- 


ffl^ 


|V*»  i 1  r-t  «-w*.i  il  .l 


A/ORTH- 


^P^: 


h 


J  ,   ^.c 


w 


im  cd 


a. 


T1 

i1 


H 


3b. 


^ 


I 


f7i.no? 


//v\AIO'^ROQ'va 


Scale:  ;£"=/' 


410 


/VCKT/H 


V 


fT^_ 


/ 


T!    D 


a^  & 


Uf^»     Ol 


Tow£A  Srccy 
~T/^/AD  FLOOR 


£>CALZ<  '/§>"=/ ' 


411 


AJOf-.ry/ 


s 


ru 


a  £=^ 


-  t 


i^fc-: 


;•, 


^ 


#N 


^   V 


MjLOOCp 


UNA1^  f\oo  aa 

SfCO/VOFiLOO^ 


^"~- 1  ' 


412 


1                  1 

1 

i  ! 

*\ 

1 

\ 

// 

■  -n 

AJO^T*4 


.^-x^i 


-a 


r^ 


^V 


U 


\ 


■-] 


5 


at 


d> 


DC 


a> 


HJ.nc? 


OP  PER.   FR.OAJ7-  HAL.L- 

6eco/jD  Floor, 


■SO^L^ 


/a"-/  ' 


413 


•    -_ 
.r.  i~" 

■■■/. 

! i  % 

m 

in  Pi 

!  i! 

i  '! 1 

II 

E=|| 

<zuosi~  r 


AJoRrH 


l" 

il 

1 

1 

m 


h 

UJ 


CD 


u 


f,  («a 


9 


^ 


-r-7^ 


1  A 


.tf 


5 

Co 


^ 
^ 


IE 


C3C 


Sspi 


^TE 


I] 


=:VS2^ 


v3i:  coajo  Floor. 


>^ 


=     {A"  =  i 


414 


APPENDIX  A 

Chronological  List  of  Occupants 
of  the  Wayside 


415 


r> 


to 

Q 


11     U 

4J 

01 

to   oi 

_ 

>>  X 

4J 

o 

co   4J 

CO 

U 

3    O 

>s 

a 

*J    I- 

4J 

c 

<0    0 

1J 

o 

to    to 

tx 

CO 

0>    OJ 

o 

c 

•H      O 

u 

■H 

4-1     C 

a 

> 

•H    0) 

■H 

>     U 

■a 

H 

■H      0) 

Ol 

4-1     V4H 

c 

cfl 

U     OJ 

3 

rd 

<  a; 

o 

3 

C 

o        ►, 

•H             CJ 

4J                 C 

re    M  ra 

C 

a  c   a. 

13 

3   iH     3 

a 

u    u    u 

0 

U    3     CJ 

0) 

o  o  o 

>1 

•*. 


*a 


^3    % 


<3  N 


0 
< 

0 
0 

c 


r\ 


5 


• 

O 

CO 

a 

o 

V3 

s 

OJ 

4-1 

•H  -H  CQ 


c 

C 

re 

r3 

X 

.e 

_c: 

0J 

*j 

4J 

re 

CO 

0! 

Z 

!5 

u 

i-i  U  rH  £ 


"5: 

.X 

11 

~n       u 

Com 

0    0)  th 

SL.  4J    to 

co 

r*. 

r* 

CO 

. — i 

■ — i 

<i      CO     CD 

^D 

r*s 

r~ 

~* 

■— ' 

~* 

- 

u 

0) 

c 

0) 

u 

-- 

*_j 

> 

3 

i-i 

c 

C 

l 

1- 

-rt 

l: 

c_ 

i: 

o 

u 

4-J 

— 

l/J 

u 

! 

I- 

0 

T-t 

o 

u 

w- 

c 

Ol 

0 

XI 

1 

u 

E 

01 

- 

Uh 

E 

> 

o 

•> 

u 

>- 

•T 

re 

CI 

r- 

*j 

4J 

r^ 

c 

in 

— . 

0) 

re 

to 

r 

ex 

01 

i- 

C 

1j 

01 

■H 

a. 

-^ 

OJ 

10 

0) 

CC 

3 

C 

c 

"? 

■H 

-j 

o 

■D 

to 

C 

t-( 

*j 

X 

B. 

01 

CJj 

^ 

c 

■H 

01 

-j 

> 

O 

re 

9 

-^ 

CT 

O   w< 

z  o 


to    . 

c   c 

O     0) 


01    t/5 

>  a 

■Ss5 

—I     01 


jr 

u 

•w 

tH 

1-1 

3 

01 

0J 

.O 

tO 

E 

u 

3 

O 

>-i 

°J 

O 

CJ 

0) 

a. 

X 

c 

Ol 

- — 

XI 

■H 

o> 

l-i 

01 

(0 

x 

Ol 

4J 

3 

01 

N 

M 

-o 

1j 

CO 

M 

1-1 

0 

I-H 

O 

o 

4-> 

60 

3 

u 

en 

u 

01 

X 
4J 

o 

J3 


a. 

UJ 


a.  re 


J= 

j= 

CO 

J= 

60 

60 

E 

M 

•H 

■H 

•H 

Ij 

l-i 

4J 

1-1 

3 

3 

01 

3 

H 

c 

i-H 

01 

Ol 

01 

0> 

01 

JO 

01 

J= 

X 

CO 

J= 

3 

3 

u 

3 

•o 
o 

J3 

01 
O) 

to 


U 
01 

-= 
a 
o 
en 
o 


i 


3- 


— <  CN 


on  CO  O  r-» 
o>  CO  O  r^ 
n  CO  X  cc 


c^  >r  co  in 


>      U      4J      > 

O    CO    CJ    o 

z  r  o  z 


U 

0) 

i 

0 

1- 

u 

01 

OJ 

« 

4J 

i-H 

c 

^H 

c 

H 

3 

^H 

01 

01 

0 

01 

|H 

:i 

3 

to 

(0 

U' 

•-I 

60 

4J 

0 

■-H 

O 

M 

o 

3 

U 

3 

3  C 

^H  4J             uO 

H  rl  -H 

0)  CO  J3 

3  60  3  i" 

E  -H  O 

CO  J  CM              1-. 

in  <  — i        cu 


4J  -H  01 


-a-        ^^ 


—i  in 


r^  D.   O    co 

-  <      4J     X 


r^  — 


oo        ad 


CNI  4J  -r^ 


416 


o 

— 

u 
3 
CO 
5C 


vO 

•c 

O    <~> 

o> 

u     U 

■a 

"O 

<u 

a) 

c 

OJ   1-1 

^ 

<D 

E    O 

to 

U 

co  u 

u 

C 

u   a 

V) 

H 

w  s: 


T3 
HI 

> 


E    E 
O 


10 


■3 


o 


— »  m        (n  co        moo        o  on 
p"»  On  ci  co  rn   iri  -j   r-- 

COCO  COCO  COCO  COCO 


sD 

CN 

ON 

\o 

-^ 

-o- 

CO    On 

" 

^ 

CN 

cm 

ai 

CSI    CN 
>>      • 

hi 

iH 

> 

u 

c 

u 

n    o 

1 

3 

o 

co 

^ 

CO 

3     01 

>-3 

z 

X 

■-J 

S 

►->  a 

CO 

~J  ("1 

—     >£> 

F-H 

co  on 

m  cn 

^H     — t 

CO    On 

-  ^  CNI    -T 


CM    -H  O   On 


■U  <U     ?n 


H 

>> 

a  .o 

~ 

co 

OJ     OJ 

>-3 

S 

CO    (i, 

CO     3 
2!    -) 


< 
C 

o 
cn 

C 

o. 
u 


•H  -rf  J= 


— 1  — I  CO 


CO  -h  — 1 


417 


t/1     01 
>.    kJ 

a    cj 


■v   > 

01    -H 

>  r-l 


u 

o 

u 

•H 

T3 

IV 

M 

„ 

01 

V4 

-C 

(LI 

CI 

4-1 

CO 

•H 

0) 

>-. 

c 

0 

■r-l 

u 

IS 

> 

4-1 

u 

V) 

oi 

■H 

CO 

«  c 

HI 

u    o 

l-l 

0)    i-( 

kl 

0. 

■H    4J 

0> 

00  eg 

£ 

» 

O    > 

01 

>-> 

rH      U 

•H 

o 

O     01 

H- 

jz 

•H     CO 

J3 

4J 

O     01 

3 

3 

0     1- 

a 

CD 

co   a 

c-> 

o 

1 

CO 

1 

—    CM 
CI    ON 

co  co 


— i  -.   — i         o\ 


OJ 

a 

c 
M 
3 

w 


M 

3 


>i 

>, 

CO 

CO 

>N 

kl 

k- 

re 

u 

u 

u 

o 

01 

k4 

BO 

3 

>. 

M 

--- 

00    l-l 
3     CO 

<  r 


a 

0 

14-1 

-o 

CJ 

c 

•rt 

0 

•n 

OJ 

c 

01 

M 

c 

0 

M 

J3 

O 

4J 

X 

3 

4J 

CO 

3 

a 

= 

re 

0 

n; 

u 

c 

J= 

CO 

s 

C 

4-1 

•H 

OJ 

- 

0 

H 

h-i 

—i 

hJ 

3 

TJ 

rH 

n 

rH 

3 

•—I 

o 

\C 

cc 

r*. 

m 

X) 

CO 

•• 

p— I 

u-\ 

~i  c» 


cm  — 


418 


APPENDIX  B 

Newspaper  Accounts  of  the  Wayside, 
1886-1916 


419 


BOSTON  EVENING  TRANSCRIPT, JULY  24,1386 


A    PHILOSOPHICAL    PIC-XIC.        I, 

A  delightful  interlude  in  the  sessions  of 
the  Concord  School  of  Philosophy  was  a  gar- 
den  party,  or,  as  it  was  humorously  entitled 
by  some  of  the  participants,  a  philosophical 
picnic,  given  Thursday  afternoon  hy  Mrs.  D. 
Lythrop,  wife  ef  the  well-known  Boston  pub- 
lisher, at  her  charming  residence,  "Way- 
side/' the  former  home  of  Hawthorne.  It 
was  an  impromptu  affair,  suggested  by  some 
of  the  younger  sages,  and  all  the  more  enjoy- 
able on  that  account. 

Since  the  death  of  Hawthorne,  "Wayside" 
has  been  a  Mecca  for  American  literary  pil- 
grims, and  there  are  few  who  are  not  familiar 
with  at  least  the  outside  of  the  ancient  and 
picturesque  dwelling,  which,  so  fir  as  ap- 
:  p*>arance  is  concerned,  Is  exactly  as  the% 
!  famous  author  left  it.  It  never  had  a  more 
,  hospitable  look  than  yesterday,  when  all  its 
doors  stood  open  to  greet  the  expected 
visitors.  The  day  wasyperfect,  and  the 
terraced  lawn  at  the  left  of  the  house, 
which  served  as  a  grand  out-door  recep- 
tion room,  was  amply  shaded  from  the 
rays  of  the  sun  by  the  wooded  hill  at  the 
back.  At  four  o'clock  the  guests  began  to 
arrive  by  twos  and  threes,  and  half  an  hour 
later  the  lawn  was  covered  with  little  groups, 
the  members  of  which  dropped  for  the  time" 
their  search  for  the  unknowable,  and  entered 
into  the  social  spirit  of  the  time  with  genuine 
fervor.  Among  those  present  were  Professor 
William  T.  Harris  of  the  School  of  Philo30 
pby ;  Frank  B.  Sanborn  ;  Hon.  Stephen  M.  Al- 
len, president  of  the  Webster  Historical  Soci- 
ety ;  Rev.  Frederick  May  Holland ;  H.  G.  O. 
Blake  ;  George  B.  Bartlett,  the  historian  of 
Concord ;  d  H.  Nichols ;  the  venerable  Miss 
Elizabeth  P.  Peabody;  Mrs.  Whiton-Stone, 
the  poet;  Mrs.  Harriet  A.  Shattuck;  Mrs 
Maria  S.Porter;  Mrs.  Elseffer,  Mrs.  Bigelow, 
Mrs.  Thompson  of  Cambridge ;  Mrs.  Davis 
of  Boston;  Miss  Webster  of  Boston;  Mrs. 
Wilcox,  Mrs.  Willard,  Mrs.  Preston;  Miss 
Wheildon  of  Concord;  Miss  Daly  of  New 
York;  Mrs.  and  Miss  Mann;  Miss  Conway, 
daughter  of  Moneure  D.  Conway;  Miss  Lom- 
bard, Miss  Kenyon,  Miss  Hastings  and 
others.  '.".'.'.".'.'  "'•'"'■     - 

It  was  an  eminently  social  gathering,  and 
almost  every  imaginable  subject  excepting 
philosophy  came  up  for  discussion.  Some 
wandered  through  the  old  paths  over  the 
hill  and  around  the  grounds;  others  went 
still  farther,  and  climbed  the  rather  shaky 
sfeps  that  led  to  the  platform  in  Hawthorne's 
pine,  while  those  of  more  sedate  age  or  of 
constitutionally-tired  habit  kept  their  seats 
or  strolled  about  the  lawn.  Some  one  sug- 
gested a  recitation  or  two  to  vary  the  pro- 
ceedings, and  Mrs.  Whiton-Stone  gave  three, 
each  different  in  character,  with  peculiar 
effect.  Miss  Mann,  who  was  for  aomp  time  a 
pupil  of  Joseffy,  played,  and  Mr.  "Nichols 
sang.  Mr.  Bartlett  then  stated  that  under 
the  circumstances  It  would  be  a  peculiarly 
fitting  thing  that  a  poem,  "The  Minute 
Man,"  written  by  the  hostess  of  the  occa- 
sion, and  published  in  the  July  number  of 
the  Wide  Awake,  ,«hould  be  read.  This  sug- 
gestion was  warmly  applauded,  and  the  au- 
thor having  declined  to  appear  as  the  reader, 
Professor  Harris  was  called  upon,  who  ren- 
dered it  with  unusual  force  and  feeling.  He 
prefaced  it  by  saying  that  he  regarded  it  as  a 
poem  of  unusual  strength,  and  that  to  him  it 
more  adequately  voiced  the  sentiment  of  the 
time  described  than  any  other  poem  of  re- 
cent writing. 


The  poem  is  a  terse  and  vigorous  piece  of 
work,  and  stirs  the  heart  like  the  beat  of  a 
war  drum.  It  is  full  of  the  spirit  which  in- 
spired the  "embattled  farmers"  on  that  event- 
ful nineteenth  -of  April  when  the  first  blow 
was  struck  for  American  freedom,  and  which 
the  poet  crystallizes  into  the  words— 

"Let  us  stand  our  "round,  and  if  we  die,  > 
Praise  GodJ  we'll  die  right  here I" 

After  the  reading  came  more  mu3ic,'andv 
then  an  elegant  lunch,  with  coffee  and  choc- 
olate, was  served  on  the  lawn.  Befcre  sep- 
arating, Mr.  Frank  B.  Santorn  extended  the 
thanks  of  the  visitors  to  the  host  and  hostess 
of  the  occasion.  Mr.  Lothrop  responded  in 
a  happy  speech,  in  which  he  said  that  he  was 
glad  to  see  that  the  seers  and  prophets  of  the 
famous  Concord  school  were  of  like  passions 
and  emotions  with  other  people  —  a  remark 
which  some  of  the  ladies  insisted  had  refer- 
ence to  their  appetites  at  lunch.  He  paid  a 
compliment  to  the  ins ti rut' m  which  they 
represented,  referring  to  our  obligations  to 
the  sages  of  the  past,  and  expressing  his 
thankfulness  that  we  still  had  them  with  us, 
and  that  from  their  observations  of  the  "eter- 
nal spaces"  we  could  have  our  eyes  turned  to 
the  stars  by  which  we  might  guide  our  barks 
aright.  He  closed  by  hoping  that  when 
they  bad  done  with  all  need  of  philosophy, 
and  were  safely  on  the  other  shore,  one  of 
their  pleasantest  reminiscences  of  the  earth 
they  had  left  behind  them  might  be  the  events 
of  the  day  just  closing. 

The  occasion  was  one  of  perfect  enjoyment 
to  all  who  took  part,  and  a  hope  for  its  repe- 
tition   before    the    close    of    the  season  was- 
many  times  ardently  expressed.  ^/r 


420 


BOSTON  EVENING  TRANSCRIPT,    WEDNESDAY , JULY  31,1889 


AT  THE  SUMMEB  BESORTS. 


lit    OLD 


CONCORD. 


1      Klrthday    Fete    a* 

Never  was  mort  c'early  Illustrated  the  triumph 
uf  e*iD»v»t  purpose  over  circumstances  or  sur- 
roundings than  last  Saturday.  It  was  the  til th 
btrthdtv  anni Ternary  of  the  little  daughter  ol  ilc. 
D.  Lothrop,  sad  preparations  bad  been  made  for 
Its  celebration  by  a  garden  fete,  at  tbe  family 
home  at  Wayside,  to  which  a  large  number  or  chil- 
dren and  young  people  had  been  ioTited.  A  heavy 
rain  set  in  during  the  nigbt  preceding,  and  by  the 
middle  of  tbe  morning  it  became  certain  tbat  it 
was  to  last  through  the  day.  Preparations  were 
at  once  made  to  change  tbe  garden  fete  to  an  in- 
door one,  and  the  large  rambling  mansion  and 
quaint  old  bam  were  immediately  utilized  for 
that  purpose. 

It  will  be  remembered  tbat  Bronson  Alcott  lived 
at  Wayside  until  1852,  and  here  the  cblldhood  or 
Louisa  and  her  sisters  was  spent.  To  eoin?o(  tbe 
younger  guests  this  fact  made  the  place  more  en- 
joyable than  because  it  was  die  bouse  of  Nath  inlet 
Hawthorne, and  when  they  found  ont  that  they  were 
"really  and  truly"  to  use  tbe  old  barn,  tbe  scene  of 
the  dramas  enacted  by  Louisa  and  the  other  "Lit- 
tle Women"  their  delight  knew  no  boond*. 

After  a  hasty  improvisation  to  take  tbe  place  of 
the  beautiful  sweep  of  lawn  and  terrace,  where  the 
f*te  was  to  have  been  held,  tbe  barn  was  a  gala 
sight;  there  were  flags  and  lanterns,  there  were 
camp  chairs  under  the  hay  lofts,  while  tbe  old 
barn  floor  filled  all  the  requirements  of  tbe  mod- 
ern stage,  and  up  above  on  tbe  loft  was  Li  Roche, 
a  young  Indian  from  Hampton  who,  with  his 
violin,  furnished  music  for  the  dancing.  By 
twelve  o'clock, t  be  hour  for  assembling,  it  stormed 
pitilessly,  but  carriages  came  from  all  direc- 
tions and  soon  nearly  one  hundred  guests  were 
gathered  under  the  roof  of  Wayside. 

The  five  arches  wbich  had  been  set  up  the  after- 
noon before  on  tbe  lawn  were  taken  down  and  sst 
up  in  tbe  barn,  covered  with  evergreen  and  roses. 
In  front  of  each  stood  a  young  eirl,  a, white  rose 
in  ber  band,  waiting  for  the  appearance  of  tbe 
little  maiden  whose  birthday  was  being  cele- 
brated. She  came  Into  the  barn  slowly  with  un- 
conscious grace  and  sweet  demeanor  and  paused 
before  the  first  arch.  Mr.  B.  F.  Redfern  of  Bos- 
ton then  read  the  initial  Terse  of  a  birthday  poem 
written  for  the  occasion.  Passing  through  tbe 
arch  she  received  the  rose  from  the  bands  of  tbe 
girl  standing  on  its  farther  side,  and  in  this  way, 
accompanied  by  the  reading  of  tte  venes.the  suc- 
cessive arches  were  passed  and  the  rojes  given— a 
rose  for  each  year— till  as  a  finale  a  sixth  verse 
was  read,  wben  five  white  ro:-es  wera  bound  on 
her  "bonny  bair."  It  was  a  rare  spectacle  of 
lovely  childhood  nnspolled  by  a  thought  of  self, 
and  from  tbe  minds  of  the  onlookers  the  picture 
of  the  little  face  with  its  clear  eyes  and  pure,  soft 
outline  and  the  dainty  figure  can  never  be  efficed. 
The  poem,  which  was  written  by  her  mother,  ap- 
pears in  another  pert  of  the  paper. 

After  this  beautiful  birtbdsy  episode,  the  fl.ior 
was  cleared  and  all  the  guests,  old  and  young, 
danced  simple,  old-fashioned  dances  and  played 
musical  games,  tbe  whole  superintended  by  Miss 
Ellen  Emerson.  Then  the  breathless  and  happy 
dancers  were  seated  and  became  the  audience, 
while  Mothtr  Goose  and  her  children  took  posses- 
sion of  the  old  barn  floor,  and  such  a  merry  party 
as  it  was!  The  characters  were  capitally  designed 
and  done  to  the  life.  The  hostess,  who  made  her- 
self one  of  the  children  during  tbe  day,  as  Mother 
Goose,  with  her  long  cloak,  steeple  hat,  spectacles 
and  staff,  led  the  procession  under  the  colored 
way  from  the  house  to  the  barn,  followed  by  ber 
numerous  children  in  ;os  ume,  Ll-tle  Miss  Mnfflt, 
Little  Boy  blue,  Simple  Simon,  Tommy  Tucker, 
Misiress  Mary,  Old  Woman  at  Banbury  Cross, 
Jack  and  Oil],  Cinderella,  Little  Red  Rldlngboad 
and  a  score  of  others.  Here  each  wai  appro- 
priately introduced  to  tbe  andience  by  Mr.  An- 
drews of  Lincoln,  who  read  the  rhyme  associated 
with  the  character.  An  Immense  shoe  Obtain- 
ing the  Old  Woman  and  her  numerous  progeny 
created  a  great  deal  of  amusement.  There  were 
songs  by  Bliss  Clarke  and  Mr.  Redfern,  and  wee 
Samuel  Bowles,  the  three-year-old  grandson  of 
E.  Rockwood  Hoar,  standing  on  the  piano,  recited 
two  quaint  bits  that  won  all  hearts. 


After  marching  around  the  supper  table  tbe 
company  dispersed  to  scatter  over  the  different 
rooms  of  the  old  boase,  there  to  be  seated  by  little 
tables,  while  some  of  Concord's  fairest  daughters 
served  tbe  feast.  We  noticed  in  tbe  old  bail  two 
long  rows  of  little  children,  and  peeping  into  the 
library  there  were  merry  groups  where  the  great 
romancer  used  to  sit  and  read  Walter  Scott's 
novels  to  bis  children. 

And  then  what  a  birthday  cake  It  was,  with  Its 
five  candles  and  its  flowers!  What  a  march,  as 
all  the  children  encircled  it,  and  how  gravely  tuj 
little  flve-year-old  maiden  passed  tbe  knife  through 
Its  whit*  surface,  cutting  the  first  piece,  Every 
child  bad  a  portion  and  a  flower,  and  tien 
marched  back  again  for  tbe  songs  and  dances, 
or  for  merry  games  with  ring-toss,  batcle- 
door  and  bean  bag]  upon  the  broad  piazza. 


Notes. 

W.  K.  Vanderbilt  arrived  at  Bar  Harbor  Tues-. 


^ 


421 


\ 


R 


cat, 

0 


"JUST  FITS    JBAJtS    OLD    TODAY.' 

MAROaRET    MOXFO&D    L'-THBOr. 
July  37,  1884-1880.       . 


Five  years  ago  a  little  child  *  . 

Came  down  to  earth;  '  '       '  '■  "' 

That  joyous  summer  morn 
A  white  rose  marked  Its  blith. 

Smile,  little  baby! 

Love  watches  o'er  thee ; 

White  is  the  path  '     ' 

That  reaches  before  thee. 

Dream  in  thy  prefy  sleep — 
Take,  little  baby,  this  rose. 

D. 

Two  little  toddling  feet, 

Sturdy  and  strong; 
Bo  tired  when  nightfall  comes, 

And  sleepj-by  song. 
On  little  feet,  another  day  greets  thee—  ■ 

'Jake,  little  one,  this  rose. 

m. 

How  merry  the  day  when  one  is  three! 
Tbe  birds  sing  it  over,  .    ,-- 

And  tbe  bees  in  tbe  clover 
Hum  gayly  the  secret— our  baby  is  threel 
Hey,  little  daffydowndllly,  .   - 

Rose-colored  clouds  are  sailing  the  s*,y; 
Tripping  feet  pass  on  tbe  tall  moadow  grass— 
Take,  little  child,  this  rose. 

rv. 

A  newer  hintof  childish  grace; 

A  little  change  In  the  baby  faoe; 

A  little  letting  down  of  tucks, 
And  many  sweet  surprises, 

Mark  daily  bow  our  baby  Blip* 

From  tender  band  and  longing  llpa,    . 

And  in  her  stead  there  rises 

Something  bonny  and  sweet  and  fair- 
Take,  wee  girlie,  this  rose. 

V.,  r 

Bf  nd  flowers,  and  let  ber  pass; 

She  is  coming  this  way      --  -' 

On  happy  feet,  her  joy  to  greet 

This  blcss*d  festal  day— 
Tate,  little  maiden,  this  rose. 

r.uu. 
At  la<t  the  five  are  all  complete, 
Birthdays  j  jyous  and  gay  and  sweet; 
Birthdays  to  bind  .n  a  rosy  chain, 
Never  to  part  from  the  years  again. 
Bind  them  fast  on  the  bonny  bair 
Of  i<D!  wee  maiden  standing  there— 
Jutt  five  years  old  todajl 

Mask  D.  Loinnor  (Margaret  Sidney). 
Wayiidt,  Concord. 


A   CHABSnNO    AFFAIR. 


Garden  rart'x  Given  at  The  Wayside. 


A  mast  delightful  garden  parry  was  given  at 
The  Wayside,  Concord,  on  Tuesday  afternoon,  by 
Mrs.  Daniel  Lothrop,  in  honor  of  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Joseph  Wilde  of  Bay  RidgerL.  I.,  guests,  for  the  . 
Time,  of  Mr.  ana  Mrs.  Lothrop.  No  more  beaati 
toT  place  for  an  occasion  of  the  kind  can  be 
Imagined  than  this  picturesque  villa,  with' its 
broad  piazzas  and  shaded  Lawn,  and  "its  adjacent 
forest  walks,  round  which  yet  linger  associations 
t>f  their  former  owner  and  frequenter,  the  gentle 
^t"1  lamented  "Hawthorne.  Since  Mr.  Lolhrop 
came  into  possession  of  the  estate  a  feature  has 
been  made  of  these  annua!  gatherings,  and  noth- 
ing had  been  spared  to  render  them  occasions  to 
be  remembered.  They  have  been  thoroughly  in- 
formal, and,  on  that  account,  the  more  enjoyable. 

The  day  was  cool  and  bracing,  an  agreeable 
'ehaog8  In  the  veither  which  'm'l  preceded  it. 
Chairs  and  cushions  were  scattered  over  the  iawii, 
while  the  white-covered  little  tables,  tbe  pile  ot 
plates  in  a  secluded  corner  and  rhe  jingle  of  forks 
and  spoons  were  pleasantly  suggestive  to  those 
whose  hurry  to  eatca  the  trains  had  shortened 
their,  home"  lcnch-iioie.  The  grand  piano. had 
been  snored  out  upon  the  piazza  1n  front  of'  the 
lawn,  and  clusters  ol  roses  bestowed  here  and 
there  gave  a  gayly-deeoratedlookto  the  surround- 
ings. «-Xtfoer  o'clock  ihe  guests  began  to  arrive 
ana  were  .received  by  the  hast  and  hostess,  who 
introduced  them  in  tarn  to  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Wilde. 
Among  thos^wuo  were  -prssenr,  residents  of  the 
town,  were-  Professor  w.  T.  Harris  and  family, 
M<?.  I!ihci.«<.u  *.(.  Miss  Ellen  Eaerson,  Frank  tk 
Sanborn,  George  B.  Bartlett  aDd  family,  Mrs. 
Edward  Hoar,  Rev.  Frederick  West  Holland. 
Judge  Brooks  and  family,  the  family  of  George 
Heywood,  Mr.  Munroe.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  E.  Damon 
and  family.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Bianchard  and  Misses 
Hosmer,  Richardson.  Pierce.  Simmons,  Fritchard 
and  McClure.  Of  the  more  promineut  guests  from 
Boston  were  Mrs.  Henrv  D.  Hyde,  Mr.  and  Mrs.  B. 
F.  Redfern,  Mrs.  Kate  Gannett  Wells,  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Elbriclge  E  Brooks.  Colonel  Stone  and  Mrs. 
WMton-Stone.  Mr.  H.  Batterworth  of  the  Youth's 
Companion.  Mrs.  Cora  St-oxt  Wheeler,  Mr.  M.  B. 
Mason,  Mrs.  C.  N.  Smith,  the  Mis3es  Ellis,  Mrs. 
Chase,  Mrs.  Bailey,  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Bolton.  Mrs. 
Julia  A.  Eastman,  the  well-known  authoress,  was 
present,  with  a  party  from  Wellesley  College,  and 
there  were,  also,  Be  v.  and  Mrs.  Fullerton  from 
WaJtham,  and  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Andrews  from 
Lincoln. 

The  mnsjcal  part  of  the  entertainment  was  un- 
usually tine.  Mr.  Redfern  Sing  several  songs 
with  capital  effect,  and  Mrs.  Redfern,  who  is  a 
pupil  of  Mjs.  Sherwood,  played  charmioeiy. 
Miss  White,  a  graduate  of  Wellesley,  delighted  air 
hearers  by  her  exquisite  singing,  and  Miss  Tufts, 
another  of  the  tair  daughters  of  Wellesley,  ac- 
companied her  admirably  on  the  piano.  Asa 
variation  in  the  informal  programme,  Mr.  San- 
born called  upon  Professor  Harris  to  give  what 
he  called  "Mis.  Lothrop's  favorite  poem."    This 

? roved  to  be  Emerson's  "Day*,"  which  was  felici- 
ously  read,  with  the  interpretation.  Mrs.  Kate 
Gannett  Wells  then  read  two  beautiful  poems 
from  the  pen  of  hi  r  brother,  Rev.  Dr.  Gannett. 

Following,  came  salads,  strawberries  and  creaa. 
and  coffee,  and  a  season  of  jollity,  which  was  all 
too  soon  interrupted  by  the  a/rival  of  the  barges, 
which  were  to  carry  a  portion  of  the  guests  to 
the  train.  Those  who  remained  gathered  around 
the  Mazing  open  Are  fn  the  sitting-:o3m,  quitting 
It  for  the  later  train  with  regret. 


That  Stolen  Clothing. 

The  police  of  Division. B  have  learned  that  the 
clothing  that  was  found  In  tbe  possession  of  four 
men  who  were  arrested  while  trying  to  pawn  It, 
Wednesday,  was  stolen  from  the  stable  of  John 
Keefe,  10  Randolph  street.  Keefe  is  an  express- 
man, and  had  the  goods  to  delWer. 


V> 


422 


/Wp-i  t-'*?° 


THE    HOME    JOURNAL, 


Wayside"    Festival. 


A  unique  affair  occurred  last  Saturday,  July 
26,  in  Old  Concord.  Mass.,  at  the  Wayside,  the 
former  home  of  Nathaniel  Hawthorne.  It  was 
the  birthday  celebration  of  the  little  daughter 
of  Mr.  Daniel  Lothrop,  the  Boston  publisher, 
■who  now  owns  Wayside,  using  it  as  his  sum. 
mer  residence. 

The  fete,  which  was  to  have  been  on  the 
spacious  lawns  and  terraces  of  the  Wayside 
estate,  was  held,  on  account  of  the  storm  which 
prevailed  all  day,  in  the  quaint  rambling 
house  and  barn  which  many  years  ago  was  the 
scene  depicted  in  "Little  Women,"  of  the 
dramas  enacted  by  Louisa  and  her  sisters,  Mr. 
Alcott  owning  Wayside  till  1852,  when  he  sold 
it  to  Mr.  Hawthorne.  The  tower  (built  by  Mr. 
Hawthorne  in  happy  memory  of  his  Italian 
life)  was  filled  with  merry  little  ones  who  were 
playing  games  with  great  zest;  the  kindly 
smile  and  magnetic  eye  of  the  great  romancer 
bending  upon  them  from  the  portrait  over  the 
high  mantel,  as  if  he  too  would  join  them  with 
all  his  heart. 

A  collation  was  served  by  Concord's  fairest 
maidens  to  the  large  company,  among  whom 
were  many  distinguished  people.  The  pro- 
gramme for  the  afternoon  began  with  the  barn 
for  a  stage  and  audience-room,  A  dialogue 
written  by  the  hostess  was  pleasingly  ren- 
dered by  ten  young  people,  and  was  followed 
by  the  pilce  de  resistance,  the  "  Birthday 
Episode,"  in  which  Father  Time  and  the  little 
child,  whose  birthday  was  being  celebrated, 
and  a  group  of  young  girls  participated ;  the 
little  one  being  crowned  with  a  wreath  of  six 
white  rosebuds  by  the  one  who  "  has  brought 
me  another  birthday." 

Dancing  in  the  barn  and  on  the  broad 
verandas  followed,  in  which  all  the  guests,  old 
as  well  as  young,  took  part,  until  five  o'clock 
brought  the  fete  to  a  close.  Then  the  ca- 
pricious sun  came  forth  and  shone  on  Con- 
cord's peaceful  meadows.  But  nothing  could 
have  been  more  beautiful  than  the  rainy  day 
birthday  fete  at  Wayside.  B. 


423 


•     '  '  ' 


TPLipii;  AT  "WAYSIDE." 

Reception    Given   by  Mr.   and 
Mrs.  D.  Lothrop  a£  Concord. 


t 


f"V       .;   '«. "  V>-       ■  .        .      ■      ..•'.•-"-*■-'. 
A    Brilliant   Scene   at   the    Old    Houw- 
•  tead— Local  Grand   Army  JPost   Re» 


r 


celved  by  ih*   Dlitlnculthed   Xa&t— 


H4 


,  YThlttler  Sends  a  Poem  —  Notable 
y      Gotiti  Who  Were  Present. 

\_  "Wayside."  with  all  Its  beauties,  and  all  Ita 

*  traditions,  "was  never  more  beautiful  than  It 
f  was  yesterday,  on  the  occasion  of  the  recep- 
l  tion  given  to  Mrs.  Logan  by  Mr.  and  Mrs.  D. 

*  JLothrop  at  Concord.    The  bouse  was  opened 

*  from  too  to  bottom,  and  the  visitors  filled  It  i 
ana  overflowed  Into  tbe  lawn,  where  tables  . 
were  set  laden  with  all  good  things,  and! 
Chalrs~and  rawn  cushions  were  placed.  The' 
bouse  was  decorated  with  gotdenrod,  irs^ 
large  vases,  set  everywhere,  tbe  hostess  wore 
a  large  bunch  of  goldenrod  as  a  corsage  boo-, 
qoet,  and  the  ushers  each  wore  ■  a! 
bit  of  this  gay  flower  In  their  button-? 
hole,  tied  with  a  knot  of  yellow  ribbon.] 
The   guests   bezan  to  arrive  at  a  little  after' 

fc  3,  although  the  hour  set  was  4.    They  were  j 

Sf  received  on  the  lawn  by  Mr.  and  Mrs.  J 
LothroD,  Mxi.  Loean,  Mr,  John  A.  Logan.  ■ 
Jr.,  Mrs.  Jonn  A  Logan,  Jr..  Mrs.  Alger,  ' 
.  Miss  Alirer,  and  later  by  Miss  Ellen  Emerson,  i 
'  who  joined  the  receiving  party  when  the  re- 
'  ception  was  about  half  over.  They  were  pre- 
sented by  the  following  eentlemen,  who  acted 
as  ushers:  Mr.  William  Bennett,  Mr.  Richard 
Wood.  Mr.  Will  Smith,  Mr,  Georee  How. 
Mr.  Harry  How,  Mr.  Fay  Haywood.  After 
t.the  guests  were  presented  ihey  were  served 
F  with  refreshment.  Mrs.  Wtlltem  T.  Harris  i 
*nresldlne  over  the  chocolate.  Mrs.  Edward  8. 
LHotr  over  tbe  coffee,  and  the  following, 
"young  'ladles  acting  as  waiters:  Miss 
'  Margaret  Blanchard,  Miss  Helen  Blancnard.  j 
Miss  Alice  Damon.  Miss  Fanny  Rotfe.  Mist ; 
Gertrude  Todd,  Miss  Belle  Wheeler,  Miss} 
Nellie  Linley.MIss  Edith  Harris.  Miss  Lillian  1 
how.  Miss  CaruUle  Benson,  Miss  Mary  Bart-! 
,  lett.  Miss  Margaret  Long.  Miss  Putnam  and  * 
'Miss  Goodwin.  -  *' 

t  About  3:30  the  sound  of  approaching  drums 
f  was  heard,  heralding  the  auproach  of  the  old 
'  Concord  post  130,  E.  T.  Phelps  commanding. '. 
They  marched  In.  were  presented  to  Mrs, 
'  Logan,  and  were  given  seats  near  the  plana, 
■  where  the  literary  exercises  were  to  take 
plaoe.    By  decrees  the  people     . 

i      Grouped   Thfmielrei   on    thr    Iawh. 

''while  on  the  piazza  were  seated  Hon.  John; 

D.  Long,  Mrs.  Loean,  ReT,  A  P.  Peabody/ 

Mrs.  Julia  Ward  Howe,   Mrs.  Abhy  Morton  \ 

Diaz,  Rev.  S.  F.  Smith,  Dr.  A  E.   Wlnsblp; 

and  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Lothrop.    Mr.lLong,  whos«; 

duty  It  was  to  preside,  made  a  most  graceful  j 

SDeeeb  of  welcome,  and  Introduced  Rev.  8.  F.* 

Smith,  who  told  tue  storv  of  how  he  ami*  to, 

write  "America."  Alter  be  had  told  his  story,  • 

the  orchestra  played  the  hymn,  and  the  audi- r 

ence  Joined  In  sluglng.  rlswe  at  they  did  so. , 

Gov.  Long  then  read  the  followlna  letter  and  • 

poem  from  John  G.  Whittier:  } 

Gum  Acm.  o»  tos  Pucu»()ri,     \  .* 

Eliot,  Me.,  Ao|.  L  1890.  f     \ 

Dear  Mrs.  Lothrop:    It  would  give  ine  great  pleat-  ] 

ore  to  eccept  tbj   clod   Invitation  to  meet   at  jeur  j 

"Wayside."     Mti.  Logan,  a  lady  for  w:u'DS  I   here  , 

lb*  highest  respect,  not  only   for  be rsell  personally,  t 

bol  a»  the  life  eoniiiamou  of  t  breve  ana  noble  mea,  - 


V 


.*-- 


♦ 


'  '  ■'.'-■|'M<  '<gl- 

-  ./>    -  '    .OJJH  COUHTK 
Oar  thought  of  thee  !«  clad  with  hope, 
n.       Dear  country  of  ooi  lore  and  prayers; 
.    Thy  way  la  down  no  fatal  slops, 
, "  '    Bat  up  to  freer  «ua  and  alia. 

Tried  a»  or  furnace  Urea,  and  yet,    ' 

-  -   By  Ood'ii  grace,  onlr  atroncer  made.         ■ 
In  future  taaka  before  thee  aet  ",  - 

*       Tnon  ahalt  not  laot  the  old-dma  aid.  - '«   ■ 

"  ttw  fatben  eleep.  bat  men  remain 
A»  true,  a*  wise  and  brave  aa  they. 
V>  by  count  the  loa*  withoot  the  gaiaf     -      ' 
The  beet  la— that  we  hare  today. 

Ko  lack  was  In  tby  primal  stock: 
Ko  weakitn;  founders  budded  here1;    • 

Thine  were  the  men  of  Plymouth  Hook, 
The  Puritan  and  Cavalier.  , 

And  they  whose  flrm  endurance  gained 
■•-     .    The  freedom  of  tte  souii  of  men.  i 

Whose  bunds  unstained  In  peace  maintained, 

-  „    Tbe  boundleas  commonwealth  of  Pens.      ' 

And  thine  shall  be  the  power  of  all 
—         To  do  tbe  work  that  dnty  bide,        -     '' 

And  make  the  people's  conncil  tiall    ■     . 
-~        A»  lasting  as  the  Pyramids, 

Thy  lesson  eQ  the  world  shah  loarn, 

Tbe  nations  at  thy  feet  shall  tit, 
Earth's  farthest  mountain  tops  shall  bora 

With,  watch-  fl  rp»  aom  tbj  own  upllt. 

.      Great  without  seeking  to  be  great     -•    ,    . 

By  fraud  or  conquest;  rich  In  gold."     -    -  -■"" 
r      Bnt  richer  In  the  large  estate 
•  ?/ ,  Of  Tlrtue,  wblch  thy  chil  Jrun  hold. 

"With  peace  that  comes  of  pnrlrr,        "  .     < 

-J"    And  strength  to  simple  Justice  doa,       .."-!._'■ 
8o  runs  our  loyal  dream  of  the*     ■• 
God  of  oux  fathers!    ilate  It  trne.  .  . 

OK  land  of  lands;  to  thee  we  give 
Onr  love,  our  trust,  our  service  free,  "  , ' 

Jot  thee  tby  sons  shall  nobly  lire. 
And  at  thy  need  shall  dia  lor  thee.  ... 

This   was   followed   by  a  s*!e«Ion    from 
Elizabeth  Smart  Piielps  Ward,  •'The  Unseen 
Comrades."    beautifully  read    by   Dr.   A.   K.  . 
WmshlD.    Dr.  A.  P.  Peaboay  made   a   short 
address,  and    Dr.  Holmes'  poem.    "Brother 
Jonathan  to  Sisier  Caroline,"  was  read.    At  , 
this  Juncture  tne  guesrs,  who  hud   to   catch  ' 
the  6:30  train,  departed,  and 

Amonc  Them  Went  Gov.  7_rfrait  i 

and  Mrs.  Jnlla  Ward  Howe,  who  was  to  have 

read  hex  "Battle  Hymn  of  the'  P.epubllc;"  but 

^  was  oumpelled  to  go  away.    The  rest  of  the 

t  proeramme  Included  the    reading    by    Dr. 

•  Wlnship,  who  assumed  the  duties  of  chalr- 
j_man,  of  Margaret  Sydney's  (Mrs.    Lothrop) 

!  poem.  "The  Minute  Man."  a  reading  by 
j  Mrs.  Ahby  Morton  Diaz  on  Plymouth  town, 
i  HDd  a  lively  little  address  of  thanks  by  Mrs. 

•  Locan,  fn.ll  of.  heart  and  tenderness.' 

•  lu  bidding  the  guests  farewell  Dr.  Wlnship 
\  said:  "For  this,  for  ibis  hour,  this  deed,  this 
:  guest,  this  ncpltallry.  we  are  truly  grateful; 
^good-by."  A  lew  last  words  with  Mrs.  Loean. 
r  and  thanks  to  the  hostess,  and  the  guests 
I  went  whirling  away  lrom  hosoitable  Way- 
I  side,  carrying  away  thepleasantest  memories 
.'  of  a  perfect  Aucust  oay,  made  more  perfect 
,  by  the  graclousness  aud  kindliness  of  the 
'  chief   guest  and   tbe  spirit   of    the   home, 

winch  every   one  felt.     Amonz   the    guests 

were :  *    ■  *    - " 

Mrs.  Chamberlain  Poor.     - 
Mr.  8dnir.pl  Boar.  ■ 

Mrs.  .Samuel  Hoar.  i 

'.Miss  Llbrlla  B alley.  | 


use    memory    wlU  be  We]>t  green   forever  In  the  j 
— ,  owing  to* 

_  ^^  vy_OBJI  Q.  WRlTTtKa 


American  heart.    1   cannot  be  with  you,  owing 
my  state  of  health,  but  1  send   some  lines  that  mi; 
not  eeem  Inappropriate.   I  ain.  vrry  trn) 


ilrs.  Oen.  Al^er. 

Miss  Alger. 

Mr.  Jonn  Logan.  Jr. 
,  Mrs.Xocan.  Jr. 
,  Dr.  A.  P.  Peabody. 

Miss  Peabody, 
'  Mrs.  E.  c  Whltoci  Stone. 
,  Mrs.  Julia  Ward  Howa 
i  Judge  Wentworia. 
'  Mrs.  Wentworth.  . 
r  Mrs.  L.  A.  W.  fowler. 

Mr.  MlcahDyer,  Jr. 

Mrs.  Mlcah  liyer.  Jr. 

Mrs. Cora  Stuart  Wbeeler. 

Hon.  Georire  Herwood. 

MaJ.  J.  li.  Wood. 

Eomer    E.   Lee    of    Kev 
Tork. 

Capt.  David  Scott,  of  m. 
Inola, 

Miss  Rlrton  of  Kentucky. 

Mr.  willim  U.  Lee, 

Sirs,  W!ll„%m  II.  Lee. 

Mr.  B.  1)  Coolldra. 

M  ra.  U.  IX  CooUdge. 

Charles  P.  Eastman. 


Her.  g.  F.  Smtta. 
Mr.lleeeklabBetterwTjrta  • 
Miss  franoea  Dyer.    . 
Miss  Ellen  Emerson. 
Mrs.  Abbv  Morton  LHas. 
Bev.  A  E.  Wlnahln, 
Capt  W.  H.  Piexrepont  of : 

Connectlcnt. 
Mrs.  W.  B.  Flerrepoirt.  • 
Mrs.    Edward     Boby    ef  J 

Chicago. 
Mra   Annie  B.  White  of  2 

Chi  cage. 
Mrs.  Oeorse  !^.  HatL 
Hon.  W.  W.  Wbellden. 
MUs  Alice  Wlieddea. 
Xts.  Joha  G.  Webstex. 
Mr.  D.  O.  HeatH. 
Mrs.  D.  G.  Heath.  , 

Sir.  slhler.  t 

Mrs.  Millar.  i 

Miss  i-.lia,  « 

:  _5 


424 


SoCTOfe^P'ilLr^^VERTIgE^    FUtBA?    MORyTNg/V     AUGUST    15,    1890. 


r^AWTHORNFS  HOME. 


MRS. 


.'  *i 


LOGAJT     RECEIVED      IN 
f'THE  WAYtsIDE." 


A  Brilliant  Gathering '  at  Old  Concord  to 
Honor  the  Heroine  of  the  Encampment 
—Welcome  bf  Ex-Goy.  Lone- A  Po»m 
From   Mr.  Wh:ttier—  Other  Exordia*. 


Concord,  Aug.  14 — [Speciaf.]  —  The 
farooos  town  of  Concord  awoke  from  its 
dream  of  the  past  today,  threw  aside  for 
a  time  its  revolutionary  memories  and 
relics  and  devoted  itself,  heart  and  soul, 
to  the  entertainment  of  its  distinguished 
'ffuest.  Mrs.  Gen.  Logaa.  Mrs.  Loeran  ar- 
rived In  the  morning,  »nd  was  immedi- 
ately driven  to  the  residence  of  her  host, 
Mr.'  and  Mrs.  Daniel  Lothrop.  A  short 
time  afterward  she  was  taken  to.  drive  and 
shown  the  many  historical  and  memorable 
spots  iu  which,  that  region  abounds. 

In  the  afternoon  a  reception  was  given 
in  ber  honor  at  "The  Wayside,*'  the  Lex- 
ington road  residence  of  the  Lothrops.  Ex- 
tensive preparations  had  been  made  for 
this  event,  and  it  proved  to  be  one  of  the 
best  condncted  and  most  snecessfal  gath- 
erings ef  its  kind  ever  held  at'Concord. 
"The  Wayside"  is'  a  residence  teeming 
with  literary  memories  and  reminiseenses, 
and  its  every  part  is  cherished  and  re- 
vered. Here  Hawthorne  lived  and  wrete, 
and  here  was  the  birthplace  of  those  liter- 
ary giants,  "The  Marble  Faun"  and  "The 
Scarlet*Letter'' ;  here  the  writings  of  Al- 
cott  were  made  and  their  thoughts  sugges- 
ted ;  here  Emerson  walked  and  thought, 
and  amid  this  environment  his  school  of 
philosophy  was  founded.  ■> 

Thehouse  had  been  tastefully  and  appro- 
priately trimmed  with  bunting  and  tiags 
in  honor  of  the  event,  and  the  floral  decora- 
tions were  numerous  and  varied.  About 
the  spacious  grounds  and  well  kept  lawn 
had  heen  placed  chairs  and  tables,  and  in 
the  shady  walks  of  the  grove  benches  had 
takea  th»ir  station  in  the  moat  romantic 
spots.  The  guests  were  met  on  their  en- 
trance'and  escorted  te  and  introduced  to  the 
host  and  their  distinguished  guests  by  a 
very  capable  oorps  of  nsbers,  consisting 
of  William  Barrett,  C.  H.  ffevweod, 
E.  F.  Wood,  A.  P.  Howe,  H.  F.  Smith,  jr., 
Q.  C  How  and  W.  L.  Smith.  The  guests 
were  received  by  Mrs.  Lothrop,  Mrs.  Gen. 
Logan,  little  Miss  Margaret  Lothrop,  Mr. 
Lothroo,  Mrs.  J.  A.  Logan,  jr.,'  Mr.  John 
A.  Logan,  jr.,  Mrs.  Gen.  Alger  and  Miss 
Alger,  in  the  order  named.  The  whole 
ceremony  of  introduction  took  place  upon 
thelawn,  and  was  conducted  in  a  perfect 
manner,  there  being  a  dellghtlul  mingling 
of  courtesy  and  formality.     '    ,v 

A  large  table  in  front  of  the  house  bore 
a  delicious  collation,  and  from  this  place 
the  refreshments  were  borne  to  the  various 
tables  scattered  over  the  lawn.  The  part 
of  waitresses  for  the  occasion  was  taken  by 
a  bevy  of  the  most  charging  and  promi- 
nent society  young  ladies  of  the  place, 
who  performed  their  arduous  duties  in  a 
most  creditable  manner,  and  comprised 
the  Misses  Gertrude  Todd,  Margaret 
Blanehard,  Alice  Damon,  Fannie  Kolfe, 
Belle  Wheeler,  Millie  Under,  Edith  Har- 
Jlliaa  How,  Camilla  Benson,  Helen 
khard,  Margaret  Long,  Grace  Putnam, 
|ie  Good wis  mnd  May  Bartlett.  An 
•tra  from  Boston  was  stationed  near 
rove  and  gave  a  most  delightful  con- 
bf  vail  selected  music    .    .  ..  .,  \r  , 


XvAJ  about  5  o'clock  a  very  choice  literary 
X'tm?  ramxne  was  commenced,  with  the 
;^ndj  ors  seated  on  the  lawn  and  the  spoak- 

fjjpr^  'eaders  and  gnests  of  honor  upon  the 
l*««  u  The  first  to  address  the  audience 
^sriii   one  of  his  characteristic,  appropriate 

»*'Ui-3..hes  was   ex-Gov.  Long.     He  said  that 


eh  id  been  requested  to  call  the  audience 
1  to  ofder,  although  the  sweet  disorder  that 
f  thenVprevailed  ought  te   he   heaven's  first 
I 'law.     We  have  all  taken    part  in  the  cele- 
ffcrat  on  to  the   heroes    of  the    war,  yet    it 
|f»ras*  let  war,bat   the  "Beginning  of  peace, 
/ xhe"  >eaee   of    the  union   of  united    states. 
*Theh)emories  were    glorious,  the  reminis- 
cences   sweet,  the    soldier  was    still  yeung 
*  through  the  immortality  of   service.      One 
Vof  the  pleasantest  features  of  this"  notable 
*Veel    that    we     will     recall  will     be    this 
swe«  and    quiet   scene?    We  are  gathered 
j.'herito  do  henor  to    a   lady  whose  name  is 
^4jn'i2iym.oas    with    that  of  the   greatest  of 
^olahteer   generals.     And  we  call  to  mind 
["thisT  afternoon    that     this      same     shade 
thaV  we    enjoy    sheltered     Alcott,     Baw- 
£  thorp,  e    and    Emerson.     And  we  have  come 
r-todo  honor  to  our  country  and  fatherland, 
'"for"  'this    hour,  with    its    association     and 
J" dedication,  is  typical  of  our  great  country. 
ir    GJrr    Long    then    introduced    Dr.     S.      F. 
^:  Smith,  the  author  of  the  hymn  "America." 
r~-J[>r.  Smith  gave  an  account  of  the  origin  of 
^4he""hymn,   telling    how     its     idea      came 
.^through  the  melody  of  the    English    "God 
i     Save  the  King,"   and    how    unexpected    by 
him  was  its  success.      He  said  that  it    was 
'     not  his  fault  t bat  it  was    well    known,    for 
the  people  had  put  it  forward  while  he  re- 
'      mained  in  the    unsuspecting    background. 
1         A  letter  was    read    from    J.    G.  Whittier 
in  which  he   expressed    his    regret    at    not 
being  able  to  ba  present,    and   enclosing    a 
poem  written    by    him  especially  for    this 
occasion.     The  poem  was  as  follows  : — 
Ol'B  COUNTET. 

Our  thonphr  of  thee  is  glad  with  hope 
Dear  country  of  our  love  and  prayers, 
Thy  way  Is  down  no  fatal  slope 
But  up  to  freer  sun  and  airs. 

Tried  as  by  furnace  fires,  and  yet 
By  God's  srace  only  stronger  made, 
Iu  futurr  tasas  before  ttiec  set 
Thou  shall  not  lacfc  tiie  old  time  aid. 

ie  fathers  sleep,  bnt  men  remain 
AS  True,  as  wise  and  brave  a?  tliey : 
why  count  the  loss  without  the  gain? 
The  test  ts  that  we  have  today. 

"^o'laefc  witsan  thy  primal  stock  ;1  « 

2^6  weaiiinclonnaen*  builued  here, 
,  Thin*  were  tSe  rueD  of  Plymouth  Hock. 
To*  Fnritah  aid  Cavalier. 

i  And  torv  whose  firm  endnranee  gained 
fTh*  Ixipiiom  orjtie  souls  of  men. 
'•■Whose  hands  unstained  in  ueaer  maintained 
The  swerdless  commonwealth  of  pen. 

And  thtne  shall  »  the  power  oE  all 
!  to  do  the  work  Umt  duty  bids, 
^Apxi  matte  the  peoble's  council  hill 
^£  listing  as  tte  Aramlds. 

T3  %  lesson  all  the  world  shall  Team, 
Tlh^nallonieAt  Ojyf**t  shall  sit. 
Ka.rt.0*  farthest  ntooutaln  tops  shall  bum 
-Willi  waich  fires  tro*A  tniue  own  upllt. 

tlreat  .withour  seeki'nl  to  be  great 
'By  tnujdor-coJi(|Dest;\rich  In  told. 
But  rV;h«  fn.  the  (axaeVst '*te 
>£Of  Tlr;'v\e  wtweli  tkj  cli&Jren  hold; 

JSUH  peA«tUat *ootnes\'  purity. 
Aid  rtreura* *»eliuirfe  Jt  nice  uue, 
3» runs  «nr  JincaJ  dream  at  thee, 
Om  «  oGr  (sthejii!  roat4  It  true. 

Of\1aud  o/  t£n"Vf  to  theeVv  e  cl»e 
Out  love.  *rtc*rt:>t.  $>\r  Bcl^uce  tree, 

;   Foi*jthoe  t  t|  .5-tfi4  fccatJ  boUy  li\e,' 

!  Anusut^fe^-d^h'li  idle  for  thee. 


Jour 


Mft^TS^OTn^Jp^rSie.  editor  ^of    the 

)urai1   at  i*JLdaca.ii *i-',,"r4ad  the   "I'nseeD 

Co»iWee'^hit:^lttahe?i   Stuart  Pholps, 

Dr.    l^rtS?><rf,"j'L*<l4  a    iE^t    address     in 

'  which  he  sai^*lt*t.w'heii  h\  was    a    senior 

■  in  college  Dr.-jFottto.  was  sTlfroshinan,  and 

a  despised  one  afloat.     It  was  lucky  that 

4  we   have  h»»n' gi*«* 'the,  «hportcnicy    to 

learn  the  true  or^T%J>o^thfsr\Treat  hymn. 

I    I    have    hsard  ^it  ia^eVery' Yand,  and  its 

iweetness    is    dcbbled .  when   Beard    away 

from    home.       Itt  wis   ioag"Sri^i  the  most 

iffect  that  I  kno^j  of  ata  cegt^  church  in 

St,     Louis    just     after    V**      "em\ncipatian 

proc'laniatioqiJ       That  litthj  fresfiman  that 

I  despised    has    nfled  a  gfc.at  pTilce  In'the 

world,  snd    I    humbly,  bow.heflre    him. 

But  I  am   no  boy,  aid  if  I  t;»f»  J°\  0>0   °f 

mv  us nalv  prose  coniposiiion*  xbe  .^dteece 

would    scatter  like    tBagies'andtny*part  in 

1    the  programme  racstse  ihnf*.  C*.  .   * 

Gov.  Long  remarked  to  th^'' ftiiSlience 
that  they  must  remerijoer  th .:hi  'iillor  In 
Dr.  Teabody's  time  w.-ta  no  hi;-,jer  tlae  a 
freshman  is  »ow.  He- then- r^iU  «ot^e  of 
li.-.rriet  Prescott*  Spoflc.rd'3  Tet»f?,  "!^;co- 
ration  Day''  and  "Altai  Fi?*<,5  that'!  he 
had  selucted  from  her  writtog^ 
occasion.  V      X     ~- 

Dr.  Holmes  sent    a    letter  of  5t5i 
with    it    the    poem,  ('Joahthan*a 
| : ._ 


B 


Over  Sister  Caroline,"  which  was  written 
before  the  war  actually  came  to  pass,  and 
this  was  read  by  Mr.  Winship. 

James  Russell  Lowell  sent  his  regTets. 
Abby  Morton  Diaz  read  selections  from 
her  writings  on  the  Puntas,  and  Mr.  Win- 
ship  read  "The  Minute  Man."  Gen. 
Alger  was  to  have  delivered  an  address, 
but  was  unable  to  be  present. 

Mr.  Winship  then  introduced  Mrs.  Logan 
in  a  very  happy  manner,  in  the  course  of 
which  he  said  that  the  greatest  thing  that 
Gen.  Logan  ever  did  was  when  ho  selected 
his  wife.  Mrs.  Logan  delivered  a  few 
appropriate  remarks,  expressing  her 
sincere  appreciation  and  gratification  at 
the  courtesies  and  attention  extended  to 
her.  She  eulogized  Hawthorne  and  his 
works  in  glowing  termi,  and  said  that  she 
now  ceased  to  wonder  at  hie  greatness 
when  he  was  inspired  by  snch  scenes.  She 
paid  ex-Gov.  Long  a  splendid  compliment, 
telling  of  the  high  opinion  of  him  that  her 
husband  had,  spoke  in  enthusiastic  terms 
}  of  her  hostess,  and  said  that  the  residence 
of  the  Hawthornes  bad  fallen  into  most 
worthy  hands.  During  the  programme  the 
orchestra  at  intervals  played  patriotic 
airs,  and  tho  exercises  concluded  with  the 
entire  audience  rising  and  singing 
"America." 

Post  140  of  Concord,  E  F.  Phelps,  com- 
mander, attended  in  a  body,  and  among 
the  prominent  guests,  not  heretofore  men- 
tioned, were  the  following  :  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
W.  H.  Lee,  Treasurer  A.  S.  Covles,  Hon. 
R.  F.  Barrett,  Thov  Todd,  Edward  Palmer, 
chief  engineer  of  the  squadron  of  evolu- 
tion, Dr.  G.  E.  Titcomb  and  wife,  Prof.  W. 
T.  Harris,  H.  A  Smith  and  wife,  Mrs. 
Samuel  Hoar,  Hon*.  Geo.  Hevwood,  Miss 
Peabodv,  Julia  Ward  Howe,  Maj.  J. 
R  Wood,  Capt.  David  Scott,  Dr.  Holland, 
Mr.  J.  H.  Jones,  Dr.  Putnam.  Miss  Rixton,  i 
Mrs.  Webster,  W.  M.  Prichard,  H.  D. 
Coolidge  and  wife,  Mrs.  Hazeltine,  Mr.  C. 
H.  Eastman,  Mrs.  L.  C.  Whiton-Stone.  W. 
W.  Whirldon,  Miss  Emerson,  H.  J.  Cool- 
idije  and  wife,  Homer  E  Lee,  Capt.  W.  H. 
Pierpoint 


425 


i 


*"'  ..." 


o 


:,-*-  *i«\***  - 


P3-. 


RECEPTION  BY  MRS.  LOTHROP. 

"Wayside."   at   Concord,  Thrown   Open 
to  Emerson  School  Members. 

The  following  from  Sunday's  Boston 
Herald  will  be  of  special  interest  In  this 
city,  the  gifted  and  noted  author  spok- 
en of  being  a  daughter  of  the  late  Ma- 
jor Sidney  M.  Stone,  of  this  city,  and 
her  girlhood  days  having  been  spent  in 
this  city: 

The  reception  given  by  Mrs.  Daniel 
Lothrop  (Margaret  Sidney)  at  "Way- 
side,," Concord,  Mass.,  laBt  Wednesday 
afternoon,  was  a  very  unique  as  well  as 
beautiful  occasion.  The  reception  was 
given  in  honor  of  the  Emerson  memori- 
al school,  now  in  session  at  old  Concord  . 
to  meet  whose  members  Mrs.  Lothrop 
Invited  her  friends  among  the  represen- 
tative people  of  Concerd. 
•  "Hillside  Chapel,"  the  old  home  of  the 
Concord  school  of  philosophy  (now 
owned  by  Mrs.  Lothrop,  had  been  the 
scene  of  a  meeting,  beginning  at  three 


426 


o'clock,  devoted  to  "Reminiscence 
Emerson/*."  whore*«  nad  gathered 
largest  audience,  of  the  .course  of  > 
tares.  And  at  the  close  at  this  n  < 
fng  the  assembly  adjourned  to  "V^ 
side"  grounds,  walking  over  the  I 
mous  "Larch  path,  opened  by  Nat  i 
lei  Hawthorne,  and  .  bordered  by  i 
larches  he  brought  from  England. 

The  grounds,  at  "Wayside"  are  | 
mous  for  their  beauty,  as  well  at  ; 
thejr  choice  literary  associations  >i 
traditions.".  The  historic  "Ridge."  u 
seventy  feet  high,  sweeps  down 
wealth  of  foliage-to  the  lawn,  ltseil : 
raced,  that  Is,  senrd-circuular  in  1  j 
making  an"  amphitheater  of  renu  ] 
ble  adaptation  for  such  a  scene  as  1 
presented  on  Wednesday  to  those  t 
tunate  enough  to  view  It 

Mrs.  Lothrop  and  her  husband, 
eminent  publisher,  here  held  many  t 
rary  gatherings.  They,  gave,  mtk 
others,  the  "philosophical  picnics  | 
the  school  of  philosophy,'  reunions  t 
were  affectionately  recalled  by  so?  < 
the  speakers' of  .Wednesday  last  a' 
most  unique  In  their  remembrance 

The  remainder  of  the  literary  ex> : 
es   from   the  "chapel   programme"  j 
given    from    the   spacious   piazza,  t 
Its    arches  of    woodbine,  the    auc « 
room  being  the  terraced  lawns,  wit  i 
adjacent    pine  groves.    Among    c  r 
butions  from  Mr.  Sanborn  and  o  3 
Mrs.     Lothrop  ead  a  letter  wrltte 
Una  Howthorne,  describing  a  pei  .c 
interview  with  Mr.  Emerson,  and 
by     Rose  Hawtborne,  to  whom  It 
been  written. 

"Wayside'*  mansion' was  thrown  « 
to    the   guests.    Hawthorne's    stui  « 
the  tower,  was  hung  with  brand  ! 
the  fragrant  pine,  drooping  over   f| 
thorne's  standing  desk,  and   ent\ 
his  portrait  above  the  mantel.    T 
staircase  and  walls  below  were  < 
with  the   same  fragrant  growth     ! 
forest,  where  Hawthorne  wandee 
ly  as  he  wrought  out  his  marvelo 
mances,   slowly  pacing  back  and  i 
on  the  "Ridge." 

In   the   large   apartment   on    th 
floor,    with    its    seven-gabled    wit  3 
the     bay  window  .  was  entwined 
pine,  and  in  this  beautiful  settln  : 
that  remarkable  bronze  bust  of    > 
Lothrop,  modelled, by  the  sculpU 
son,   that   attracted   so   much   at(  •< 
when  exhibited  at  the  Boston  A- 
seum  some  years  ago.    The  lnsc  I 
beneath,   written  by  his  friend  < 
years,  Edward  Everett  Hale,  Is    c 
strong  and  beautiful:,   "Daniel  I-  I 
was  the  founder  of  the  house  of    ) 
throp  Company.    An  American  t'  r 
and    through,    he '  repre?ents    An  - 
eduucation  at  Us  best." 

"Wayside"  mansion  has  a  larg> 
bling  interior  of  the  pattern  of    i 
English  house.    The  addition*  "m  ' 
Bronson  Alcott,  who  owned  It  fn  i 
to.lS52,   and  those  of  Hawthorn  , 
bought  the  estate  from  Alcott  !  ) 
were     made   without  alteration     I 
original     structure.    It    thervfor 
sents  the   unique   rvsult  of  the  <  • 
architecture     andu,     that    of    th« 
modern  periods,   which  Ilawthoi  • 
!sh»>d  by  adding  1U»  now  fan 
world-known   tow»r  Mudy     To 
at  will  In  this  old  r.-.anslon  i  ■■  I    • 
Its  grounds  afforded  i;.-rat  J-  '..•>>   ' 
members     of     the     ITr.irvn     •:.  ■'■ 
school,  many  of  whom  In  1  >    :    : 
n  great  dlJiarc*  to  attend  t'u   d  • 
kvturrs.     A     bandsom*    dial;,   i 
s;.r*ad  on  the  liwn.  *€r»ed  by  '.   W 
res*J  ■'  Jlivj  of  O^l-corC*  ai  fat  I' 


r 


k 


SEPTEMBER   20,    19tLb 


rPersonais 


PERSONALS 


IK>IU>   ASD    LADY  ABERDEEX    GITCSTS 

.'Mrs.  Daniel  Lothrap  Enterliln  ing  tHs- 
tlnipilihed  Visitors  at  "The  Way- 
side,"   Concord 

j  Lord  and  Lady  Aberdeen  are  guests 
j  of  Mrs.  Daniel  Lothrop  ("Margaret  Sld- 
.  ney")  at  "The-  Wayside,"  Mrs.  LothrQp's 
i  home  in  Concord,  which  formerly  was 
that  of  Hawthorne.  Mrs.  Lothrop's  dis- 
tinguished guests  reached  Concord  on 
Tuesday  and  will  remain  there  with*  their 
hostess  until  Thursday.  They  are  all  old- 
time  friends.  In  their  honor,  Mrs. 
Lothrop  arranged  a  gathering  for  this 
afternoon  at  "Hillside  Chapel,"  the  place 
made  noted  by  the  Concord  School  of 
Philosophy,  which  held  Its  meetings  there 
In  the  open.  Mrs.  Lothrop  planned  a 
programme  to  Include  addresses  by  Lord 
Aberdeen  and  Lady  Aberdeen,  also  by 
Governor  McCall,  and  Frank.  B.  Sanborn, 
the  last  survivor  of  the  original  members 
of  the  School  of  Philosophy.  Mrs. 
Lothrop  also  is  among  the  _  speakers. 
Those  Invited  were  asked  to  go  after- 
ward to  /'The  Wayside"  for  an  Informal 
receptlon_on  the  lawn,  in  honor  of  Lord 
and  Lady  Aberdeen,  with  tea  served  in- 
doors. Mrs.  Lothrop's  Invitations  went 
chiefly  to  men  and  wome'n  noted  in  liter- 
ary circles. 


J 


427 


Authors'  Club  at  "Wayside"; 
►    ,  '"  Some  Other  Notes 

The  Boston  Authors'  Club  was  en- 
tertained   Wednesday    afternoon    by 
Mrs.  Daniel  Lothrop  and  Miss  Loth.- 
rop    at    The    "Wayside,    Hawthorne's 
home    in    Concord.     Appropriate    ad- ' 
dresses  were  made  by  Judge  Robert. 
Grant,    Mr.    Charles    Francis    Adams' 
and  Mr.  Frank  Sanborn.     Some  thera; 
were  the  Rev.  William  H.  van  Allen,  j 
Mrs.  Grant,  Mrs.  and  the  Misses  Mc-> 
j  Call,   Dr.   Benjamin   Rand,   Dean   and ' 
Mrs.  Hodges.  Mrs.  Marc  Kellner,  Prof, 
and    Mrs.    Dallas    Love    Sharpe.    Mr. 
and    Mrs.    Carlton    Noyes.    Mrs.    Jo- 
sephine Peabody  Marks,  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Calne,  Mrs.  Burt  G.  Wilder.  Prof,  and  . 
Miss  Muensterberg,  Dr.  Edmund  von 
Mach,  Mhss  Margaret  Morse,  Mr.  and 
Mrs.   William   Dana   Crcutt,   Mr.  and 
Mrs.  H.  Addlngton  Bruce,  Miss  Helen 
Clarke     and     Mrs.     Abbi«      Farwell 
Brown.  •- 


428 


APPENDIX  C 

Room-by-Room  Inventory,  The  Wayside, 
October  1914 


429 


O" 


V^r 


FOR  AUTHORS,  MiNiSTEHS,  &  STUDENTS. 
^P*J  <^    P     ^^  ^ 


y' 


m 


1 

! 

FOUR 

SIZE 

s. 

!  No. 

i... 

i... 



4    * 
4Jx 

6j 
7 

|    Xo. 
|    No. 

4— 

...    6Jx 
—     7   x 

8 

4.    W.    *    CO.    LTD. 


430 


A> 


+        I 


r 


Cih      /<_aj>^-o        —     jT->>3-.-Si^-/j-j-&  dt 


1/  , 


/-/\ 


■^ 


•;- 


n^J) 


•  J 


1- 


S^y^J 


s>-AJU^U\. 


u 


r) 


/UA 


■JcL. 


! 


A  -If 


y- 


!  f 


Cl    i    ^JUjltCLk, 


•J- 


'■^Jk-'JcJk:  l 


L 


!XAX^  J 


iHu- 


W    U 


lru^ZJL.J 


^i>UJi 


\*9 


-  V 


431 


XlxX-w* 


o 


v< 


c?* 


^  y 


^-     -^     '/ 


L  -  / 


/J<-* 


? 


f 


I  ; 

/   I 

i 

J 


A 


1x3 


CrJUJL. 


) 


*w 


I   \   KJ 


>     PL^^JU^J^-- 


l      ! 


T-       I-  I     £>-^£% 


JJu&y        (J  \ 


u 


!c^-v>*2li>Y 


■I  .     J 


432 


s^\ 


Y     t  n 


f 


u^ 


I 
I. 


&&&-—-• 


•ChJl^S- 


^o 


I 

J 

i     i  Ajdl      q  cr*4 


/  <*. 


1       C-^L^O 


^^WL/QJL 


3 

J 


a. 


Vi>uO  A 


f 


«-u£Tv  --<-£-£j£_ 


^r 


^  -  na       .^n  : 


/l^v>UXL  &^0<^Si      -&CO. 


i       huumJj^        ^^h^AjL^. 


h^t-JL. 


J*As^<>      JLpu^jJL.    ^Lii^o        [^uAtx^j 


i 

f 
i 


■( 


Jruj-^jl     sUr*l>4        etf^AsC*)      ^^ 


n 


s 


433 


^ 


o 


<^J 


o£7~C<-  , 


i/U 


ZU 


^  .  I     .     A  /J -  '  *  /)  *  •    •     * 

i  *  t  ' 


c^.    c. 


r  ^szj-u, 


/> 


i    sJLuJL 


/ 


/' 


/= 


•  » 


»» 


/iJ^WA      V^ooCLji         M-ov^<a       ^"wKru 

— / 1-  - 


434 


7  f    *    0 


l 

i 

j 

i 


T  I  ,  I 


Ml 


m  " 


j   ! 


!, 


hULt     ssrdZjL    '  k^& 


V 


1  J^J^J.     P-^-fi 


< . 


/£ 


-     j 


i  •  ......  , 


435 


i? 


£^A*^       <>V^ 


^yVs 


J 


i     r  n 


JcjWi 


r 


1.4.  dU 


r 


0  •  ,'»-*-  \ 


I  f 


(°i^ 


M 
it 


<U^Oj      I 


\    ;  / 


*$ 


<j-i  <t^ 


436 


/vj-^^_ 


/-.  ^ 


>jjtv    ^3 


^_ 


.,3. 


.£u>. 


5T= 


t     ! 


i    ! 


■J-  \ 


n 


f^JL^TJ^LX 


y 


437 


/ >A?XJUUX<3         /1X^U^>^P       /^OU^-fS^X^T 


i   ! 


■^-"J^&^s.    -A>^.      Aiu_4    Jcs^-4-1^^ 


438 


ys\J>^  * 


*  »j 


— \ 


;* 


2 


1 1 

.'A 


i  i 

t'  I 


;'■$ 


i  i 


t 


J  ft  /I    v!-       /I  II 

\      S 


fV s- 


/jiAJU^ — 


1       S*. 


To/tL    &>-/**- 


<JZ-_*^A-<-oO 


U    £^~* 


i  /O        'A- 


439 


^~<^<A 


**    y^ 

! 

I 


1r 


y^ 


J-A 


/oJLj 


A*^       ^      XiX    ^UUAA^)^ 


1/         A  -'J 


0 


V3>a£_      -^o^s^j^        ,£$-, 


jJv^Xu^o 


W^Ax> 


x<i^\Xa^ 


i   ftvJLuJG"    >A.   AjJ^Ic 


r-^y^CcA^-o 


440 


r 


U-i 


j      |     T^      U^Ttgv^      ^    ^^    J^£      $JLA_ 

i 


441 


/-* 


'  — »/      /^ — 


**)&-   if*     's. 


i 
/    j 

3  ! 

i 
i 
i 

/  ! 


/     ' 


!       I 


I     ! 


*"      -fuJL&i    <ytj~~s 


■ — * — 


fcLwr  JLA    ir  Ch 


o  :, 


/&^» 


\       C  ft-  '  -T- 


J 


)l 


l^T^^y) 


.11 

I. 


>^Jl      V 


or 


x-^x-*   ZjC-fc,    i^a-M»      5^» 


-  7VdL 


• 


442 


VN 


--Y 


Cj 


r  *- 


s£<^J\ 


J. 


-  iJcJLlzju^    ^Jl 


'ZJL-tTu 


// 


^Jj       SJtyO 


443 


1   '?>■/         t,  '(/ 


>wi-&L    /  J^k 


i        •    •  '      k   •  'l\  $ — 

i 


444 


(fiju 


/~y. 


f± 


Ca-^J-^jJ-Jl^ 


/•^x^jJuu^o-   SJjuj-^ssas-; 


w-\   -<rCu^    ^ 


JLJLo 


-^uH' 


445 


i»jaJli-    l~tcr 


.1     f4 


iv 


dj^jL^KxJU^P  ■  Q_ 


"K« 


!    I 


!     : 


'  '■'  ,  iU 


»        * 


/    i  cierSlo    J^l. 


To/*L  iWL  T^>   £iu\* 


^^TCUA-riAuhAi 


I      I 


I      i 


^^Mhj^ 


2-  AA, 


i  •  |    .   •  ■ 

i       k*    -H^  !*^£^^-   -To^&l-  ^i-v^A_ 

1  •/  0 


446 


c 


V^J^s^L 


O 


-i 


j 


<k 


/^7 


JL    /QJUJ^JXXX    ^ihSL^z^o     y^JuOL^.     '^jLjllU 

r 


447 


— ■ { V       -  -  r 


"it  cuu, 


•v 


^ 


i 


2-  /5-^U^CCr^^O. 


i 


l» 


/ 


5- 


A^^J^Cn^   ^  ZXz^J 


HU  oL-^i. 


't  A-iLK-A 


y 


448 


lui-Cr 


stCruJ    iLj 


n<-     •  / 


11/ 


D 

\aulL 


K^y^j^ro 


cu>~ 


-^g2-  ~ — =: 


j*j&L- 


TT 


173 


n 


449 


C&jL  p. 


■S-Or~Li. 


iij^r— 


-7~.        I 


4- 


c 


J     i 

j  ! 

i 

1   I 


0 

it  N    - 


'./^^•O 


\l 


-^Ax-ocJu_  /Ccirui 


I   : 


/2^-oJ5 


f 


i 


o£L» 


ix^-  u^y> 


|    ;   Au>HU>u      >tu^-    -VuaJ 


i  i  Wi  .  wuJLr  'Cu^o-l^ 


;  . 


OiiJu) 


450 


s\ 


£ 


£- 


r 


j 


Wxo.     lr£^_Y-  WTjoJfc.     -^j^oc^l^J    Mj^u^^ 


r 


\ . 


i  i 


ii 


xlvvSr 


451 


tihcZT      {&* 


'7    ] 


0 


/Q_M>vA^U 


•-^o 


f      rsl        A  ft 


PJ^U-CK^ 


/-*A;J^'- 


^LAjlxT^-O 


/   ^<AJ> 


A 


-—yr^SS+^J 


I 


/^LU>^-^ 


452 


L^j 


I 


•?,  ,i 


IuSuuul^^ 


■-CCO 


/4U.     u 


UjuJ? 


Jf 


Hj 


3  %**.   jAo^J^     -eu^Lu. 


<  w 


1  Si 


ai^JL>, 


■■wM^o 


453 


,ia 


I      o 


.!/ 


/ZJ^^XkSLK^ 


•CuX"  Q^CLxiXi       -^K-C  - 


aLc£ 


fc      !      G^La*"      -<^2, 


t 


r, 


'/ 


J^J-yj^Jj^Cir: 


u 


T^l 


f-f  l> 


i  fl 


/ 


jUuU"  cLoJL     (***+~Jlj 


K  •  Lit 

11  d^o2o-<; 


l 

G>  !   5uu_IJt_o     cL^ojlOx    kJbJZ 

'S"\  ji  brJLoJkJLJi  // 

_l  ft        ..// 

i 

■H  ! 


'i 


l» 


^-~uJ>    C{ 


AJX>aJUs> 


454 


0  '' 


J     , 


f* 


i  « 


•  I 


#  |  :>^a2    ^iaiz; 


/  .. 


o)     TJi 


"<■>*-■, 


u^i  ^ 


\!>-Lu±-yi/siuJiL    \xL 


r^ 


s 


\J^j'^> 


'l^J 


(>  f,  — 

J  ,     ',  / 


£  ^ 

U-^-0 


0' 


It 


_/ 


455 


f, 


^uri 


n 


LA 


^-O 


J 


1       '     S~J-+^.Jj}  **  _»>_.  ._.       _ 


^     : 
i 

.'       i 

^     i 
i 

'       I 

J 

x   ! 

i  ! 

i 

: 
J 

i    i 

i 

i     I 

i 
i 

t 

*  ! 

a.  ! 


/a 


SMA. 


A^3    *f-i^, 


OuJJ^ 


1 


/      *\ 


•  i 


>v«'  _ 


i 


kj&CCihstj      Sj^X  cU^JLj, 


^TMSjJ¥       ylJyj^X       J^JIJUJ     -^^JlJJjL.    iLJL     yUjyjk*  JL* 


•i>-^>^    y< 


■  */u>L^E- 


Ui^- 


/. 


C£-     1,1 


456 


f  l  i 


J    \ 


I 


& 


I 
i 


f^j>Xo<*-     ctu^^L. 


■j 


457 


APPENDIX  D 

Room-by-Room  Inventory,  The  Wayside 
May  1,  1915 


458 


u: 


-     Ht 


^ 
-S 


*3 


v 


C\ 


I  1  i  <m 


<t 


V5 


^  4 


^4 


^ 


459 


J 


->s  j-  .5 


i  ^ 


<n 


V  -<L  -<    N  ^ 


a 


.1 


v  V 
v,    c 


0    .  ^ 


i 


^ 

^ 


all 


•V 


<i  ^  S  -r 


vo 


-^r  ^bt- 


3  >„»  H  3  4  *i  l 

3 


3     •>,  .c£«       riO 


^ 


* 


^ 


J 
0 


J 
•si* 


'X  H^  ^  •« 


^ 


"IM^ 


wty>^ 


n 


X 


1 


^ 


i 


c. 


30     .   ^   * 


•I   ^ 


i4?  j^.,3 


^  ^  ^%\j  ^  C 


V. 


N 


v  ^- 
N7 


<s 


i   o 


< 


\ 


^3  4; 


J 


S 


^ 

Qx 


J. 


r1     ^    '  3  ^ 

^  *  h  A  -Li  ^'  r 


V 

1 


<4 


'  s. 


?N 


=2 


->^ 


■^^j 

^ 


^c 


J 

0 


^ 


^-  \>-- 


1  .^ 


^1  3 


4  > 


s 


3 


^ 


1 


*$ 


a 


a 


y 


461 


,  \ 


1 

%\ 


1 
0$ 


iN 


vJ    _ 


1» 


>[    vi 


^  jS    5     \   V  "9    ^  V 


6 


<8 


0 


-  V^' 


i3^   I 


4  v 

IT 

I 


'3, 


N 


*J 


1    ft   \5J-i 


N     o 


^ 


°S^    4 


u 


^V    VJ 


^  ^ 


5  '3  ** 

0    "^   ^       ^ 


J  8   <•  ^ 


^ 


4 


3 


4 

1 


C-4   ^<a 


1 


<^o 


Co    jJ 


H. 


^  1 3 


V^       iV       '<5^        r<_         0 


y 


^ .  ^ 


\n> 


vr< 


*§  ■■  3  2  ^ 


vN 


"t  A"  -^ 


J>H  '$  S 


i<  ^ 


^i 


<L    l  J    i     I 


§ 


*St 


> 


^i 

^ 


* 

^ 


0     t 


463 


I  \' 


vj 


s^^i^?f 


Cn 


464 


i 


^  4  ^  ^  ^    /  ^ 

S     N     v    "  -     ^ . 


^      ^ 


"V 


"^ 


r. 


465 


^4 


*    I 
SI 


U  ■ 

^4  ?  "i  4  i- 


*s 


so       -% 


^  i 


4  ^ 


^ 


I 


^x 


vj       ^ 


3 


& 


^J 


:/ 


V 


1 


?     O 


*'« 


4  ^hr|  *■  ,i  1 


i 


) 
•^ 


k. 


^ 

A 


C 


s 


fl   6 


1  -    ^  ^  :■  ^ 


^^^ 


x^  -^   ^  ~^>  ^s     ^ 


r>; 


^     ^     ^  ^i     /  5  "rf        ^  f:   ; 


v' 


*       c; 


,3   i  ^ 


V    / 


iw 


X 


c3 


1  ^v  w 


^ 


<0 


S  ^1  ^ 


NC 


X/ 


\ 


-^ 


v' 


^ 


<5 


I 


%- 
^ 


U1 


3    "Vs     s  p  ^ 


^  i  r:  jv.i 


2  *  *    r  <  \i  "$ 

\^       TV 


^  • 


a 


^15 


H 


<  ! 


^ 


^3   o 


A 


■o^  1-11  ^, 


1 


4C 


J 

v. 

c' 


^' 


.o 


467 


^ 

%  5 


V 


-' 


<fe 


,5- 


M  ^A    | 
i?   c-5   rr — r  v  ^4-~> 

A       ,^^^V     j 


C*0   00 


X 


1 


,v 


•K    ^ 


55 

CI 


3 


^ 


'J 


j 


<s  ^s 


*  \i 

i    J   i   4  -1 

4  1 '   1 1 


l  -1  v 


468 


^./ 


V 
V, 


^'; 


1c 

.5  d 


i  -^ 


0 


Ki, 


3 


21*  cNJ  ^ 


$ 


l         'J         - ; 


i 

(    * 


i 

'n1 


0 


O 


«  v 


^' 


J 

1 


J 

5     3 


c^  ^ 


^ 


^^0-<\0     i 


H\ 


i 


I 

JL 


i 

t 


X 


/'/  ^j     -     O     ^>     r^  Vs  ^3    °^   «! 


469 


V 


■ 


Y 

si 


S 

* 


V 

'4 


^ 


■n  ■ 


nil*  ■   . 


^ 


Ks 


1- 


^ 


V. 


%5 


vy 

\ 

i 
iC 


^ 


; 


>     fc 


^; 


CJ 


•^ 


H 


^^  On  -v 


470 


c, 


KS 


^-•C- 


vy 


ill 

ii 

i\ 

I 


^- 


^ 


i 

o1 


S     .J    Q     ^  n 


j  %  ^j  .^ 

1.1 


3  "*  n< 


2 


4^^ 


i 


^ 

V 

*' 


3 


X 


^sX, 


& 


\1      0SS\0    N^ 


^^-^ 


; 


«"  <5  WS 


3 


0 


vl 

".3.3 


4-4 


\ 


s 


V. 


■   1 

1l  1 


-1 


3    m    i     o  ^y 


'4 


^    r^      S    Co  **    < 


*S 


471 


V! 

S5I 


£ 


* 


> 


4J.|  ^ 


i 


0    ^      0       cV 


Y 


v^  \     <SS 


4    ***^    ^ 


^    ^  ^x 


c<    "H 


v^SO 


472 


473 


^ 


/  ^ 


0 


^ri 


^ 


1 


* 


■4 


» 

^ 


4    ^ 


Ml 


^  i  ^  •  1 


^  1  j>) 


N 

V 


^ 


"^\6 


<i     ^3    >J 


.1^ 


^^\>     -~£> 


C    / 


V^^"    ^ 


474 


^ 


<s 


J   ! 


^ 


*X 


^  r-» 


NO 


r  v 


V 


<d 


V 

c 


3 


^y 


ft    ^ 

4  i 

X    ^ 


*\ 


V.1 


;5  ^ 


3    *J 


1      Vi 


0 


j      *      - 


^  ^      ) 


3 


* 


h 


4 


1  ^ 


S 


1 


< 


j 


s 

0 

^1 


§3 


<- 


£ 


4 


V^ 


T 


X 


v  -v 


/ 


^V: 


^a 


V 


J 


^  r' 


^- 


|  ^ 


X' 


475 


^ 


si  •' 


X3 


v 


*  I' 


N 


^ 


>  <4 


Si- 


•  \ 

J 


k 


w 


\ 


\\ 


■s 


.         ^ 


V' 


»^J 


^  *  jw  ^  \  ^ 


^, 


i 


i   4^- 


sJ 


§      11  * 


^^ 


■>&■ 

r  ■ 

A 


^ 


*t 


i       ^ 


N.     •      \^J 


s  Vds^  \1 


476 


^J 


^1- 

:*S5  i : 


0 

to 


"" 


/ 


v 


- 


V  L;  JK3 


^> 


ti^T*^*!^ 


477 


/?*>' 


L,         ^'       -        ■ *^ 


CJL 


*  M^  /«&&.  pigcJ^^L  e^ 


x^K 


t .     •■ 


'-Z^L 


^'d_<* 


3 


v/ 


/?  / 


/ 


o. 


L^3 


/^./ 


<  /    ,-? 


'&■ 


ft 


'I 

c 
//       o 


?/ 


478 


Ill) 


/)_       /  


)>y/'4/'.H 


•    -^  /^^  ....-:.....  V  ^^'  -hs-e^L^,_ 


'/-■'  r.  -  v  *   "-•:.? 


-r^^-e^*^    7«"gg~ 


-^-^j^C 


479 


7  n,  f-      op 

•7  o.^jh^r  ..-?_..- 


ij^'j-p-rTt*  - 


V 


/  ^ 


v//?*J*.      ..  " 


1 

■    '),     Isi  'I 

i  " 


480 


I<ii5 


,   „  u    ■ a  a 


)    / 


J   ^O^t        *<£k>0^.       df^Z.^     (ZJtl^cJZ 


J    CloJl^     *jC 


f 


u  " 


481 


/?9 


v^  /  f  C^-U^t 


i^. 


L^ist 


L/L/lslS!A,<~ 


T 


£^ 


J/  //j-a^lou 


-^ 


(7 


^i^U^- 


>JZjI_ 


I  A. 


/ 


4^**<i_ 


/■• 


-V\  -. 


/? 


*<-*~Jl£    >■<■ 


* 


482 


*jf  l< 


U,  °-Via>^^    (~^>~uls£z^, 


,-vy 


^/*W£x^  „  ft         ', 


483 


IV f 


\    SI 


s3   4tu^      &U.AsQ  ^~~  &7~ 


V 


u 


s/    ^hU     ft     \  « 


i-4i^>-t« 


a. 


l^f  ,      ,-» 


7  /  9u*euJL    ■     «■. 


{AUl+d       tf-Cl^+JZ.  & 


/• 


y/ 


h  -L  ' 


\l  /  * 

yr  /  /.  A 


\ 


484 


IfJJ 


J\  (J^oUui^^       (^tA-sCv-ui, 


J%    ^/^    HuiudL^^    &J& 


> 


v 


9**^#7ZZ?e  >  0.tt,W  h    ^--?-   '■'■"-      / 


485 


AWNINGS   REPORT 

This  report  was   commissioned  to  determine  the  appropriateness  of 
exterior  awnings   at  the  Wayside.      In  1981,   there  was  a  set   of   awnings 
in  the  Wayside's   attic.     Park  employees  wished  to  know  the   age  of 
those  awnings,   whether  the  Lothrop  family  used  them  or  other  awnings, 
and   how  reproduction   awnings  could   be   acauired.     The  Superintendent's 
intention  was,    if  evidence  warranted,    to  refit   the  Wayside  with   awn- 
ings during  the   summer.     This   report   will    show  that   the  Lothrops   did 
use  awnings   and  their  reproduction   and   use  would   be   appropriate  for 
three  reasons. 

First,   the   awnings  would   be  one  more  way  to  restore  the  Wayside's 
exterior  appearance  to  HML's   occupancy.     Second,   the  awnings   are 
practical    as  well    as  decorative.     They  would  protect  the  Wayside's 
interiors  from  sun  damage  in  a  fitting   and   attractive  manner.     Third, 
the  Wayside  decked  out  for  summer  will    attract  even  more  visitors. 

Evidence  for  this   report   is   gathered  from  material    survivals,   docu- 
mentary photographs,    and   contemporary  writing  from  the   late   nine- 
teenth  and  early  twentieth   centuries. 


486 


Awnings,  Italian  awnings,  or  shades  as  they  were  variously  called, 
were  considered  an  important  part  of  home  decoration  at  the  time  the 
Lothrops  purchased  the  Wayside  in  1883.  Originally  part  of  the  uphol- 
sterer's job,  awning  manufacturing  companies  began  to  appear  in  the 
late  nineteenth  century.  F.A.  Moreland  in  Practical  Decorative  Up- 
holstery noted,  "Nothing  in  all  the  summer  furnishings  supplies  so 
much  of  real  comfort  and  benefit  as  the  Italian  awning,  shielding  the 
apartment  from  the  glare  of  sunlight,  without  the  suffocating  effect 
of  the  shade  drawn  down... and  also  protecting  the  open  windows  on 
rainy  days. . . . "1 

Photographic  evidence  indicates  the  acceptable  use  of  awnings.  In 
Patterson,  New  Jersey  (published  in  1890),  Charles  A.  Shriner  includes 
photos  of  noted  residents'  homes.  Awnings  abound.  James  A.  Morris- 
sea's  house,  for  example,  has  striped  awnings  over  the  second  floor 
corner  windows.  These  were  drawn  up.  A  similar  set  over  the  down- 
stairs windows  are   extended. 2 

The  photograph  file  in  tne  Philadelphia  Athenaeum  includes  views  of 
the  Stewart  house  in  Torresdale  with  awnings  on  a  second  floor  porch. 


1.  F.A.  Moreland,  Practical  Decorative  Upholstery,  reprinted  as 
The  Curtain-Maker 's~Handbook  (New  York:  E.P.  Dutton,  1979):  313. 
Originally  published  in  Boston,  1890. 

2.  Charles  A.  Shriner,  Patterson,  New  Jersey  (Patterson:  The  Press 
Printing  and  Publishing  Company,  1890):  242. 


487 


The   awnings   have   scalloped   edges.     The  Nelson   Brown  Estate    in  Torres- 
dale   has   a  striped,    eliptical    awning  on   the   first   floor.      The  Fitler 
house,    also   in  Torresdale,    has   eliptical    and   square-sided   awnings  with 
scalloped   and   straight   edges. 3 

These   examples   along  with   physical    evidence  from  the  Wayside   (exam- 
ined  below)    indicate   that   use   and   function  ranked   slightly   above 
appearance   and   uniformity  in   awning  design   and   placement.     Awnings 
were   attached  where  needed.      If   all    windows   on   the   same   exposure  did 
not   receive  equal    amounts   of   harsh   sunlight,   the   end   or  facade  was   not 
outfitted  with   a  complete   set  of   awnings.      Household   awnings   (we   are 
not  considering  commercial    awnings   for   the   purposes   of  this   report) 
could   be  raised   and    lowered   as   needed.     This  was   done  without 
consideration  of  the  home's  exterior   appearance  at   a  given  time  of 
day.      Thus,   the  Morrissea  house  would   have  one   awning   raised   and   one 
lowered   at   the   same  time.     This   is   important   to   remember   in  managing 
reproduced   awnings  for   the  Wayside.     There  was   some  discrepancy 
between   the   ideal    display  of   awnings   as   portrayed    in   contemporary 
advertisements   and   the   actual    use  of   awnings   as   seen   in   photographs. 
The   variety  of   edgings  on   the   awnings   on  the  Fitler   home   are   also 
significant.     One  might    initially  order  a   set   of  awnings;   but    if   one 
window  awning 


3.      Photograph   file,   Philadelphia  Athenaeum,    Nos.   300,   308,    and  310 
respectively. 


488 


received  more  use  and  degraded  before  the  others,  it  was  individually 
replaced.  This  is  markedly  different  from  acceptable  interior  window 
hangings. 

The  canvas  awnings  were  made  at  the  shop  and  stretched  over  a  metal 
armature.  On  site,  they  were  affixed  to  the  exterior  window  frame. 
F.A.  Moreland  writes: 


The  usual  way  of  placing  the  window  awning  is 
on  the  outside  face  of  the  frame  just  inside  of 
the  blinds,  so  that  they  [the  blinds]  could  not  be 
used.  The  end  of  the  iron  frame  is  hinged  to  the 
window  frame  about  three  inches  below  the  upper 
half  of  the  window,  the  frame  reaching  to  the  top 
of  the  window  when  drawn  up,  and  of  course  the 
projection  when  lowered  down  over  the  window  is 
equal  to  three  inches  more  than  one  half  of  the 
window.  Thus  only  two  measures  are   required, 
viz.:  the  width  between  the  blinds,  and  the 
height  of  the  upper  half  of  the  window  with  three 
inches  added. 

Should  the  window  be  arched  at  the  top,  take  a 
pattern  of  the  arch  on  paper,  or  if  a  semi -cir- 
cle, send  the  radius.  Sometimes  a  projection  is 
required  greater  than  one-half  of  the  space,  as 
in  the  case  where  the  awning  is  to  be  made  as  a 
canopy  over  a  door  or  similar  situation,  and  to 
raise  the  iron  frame  would  carry  the  top  far 
above  the  limits  of  the  space;  the  frame,  instead 
of  being  hinged  to  the  wall,  would  be  fitted  to 
upright  rods  attached  to  the  wall  and  made  to 
slide  up  and  down,  so  that  when  the  awning  was  not 
in  use,  and  drawn  up  against  the  wall,  the  lower 
ends  would  slide  downward. 

A  aoor  awning  projecting  over  a  flight  of  steps 
can  be  placed  quite  low  down  on  the  door  frame 


489 


. . . [but] . . . al low  enough  height  for  a  person  to 
walk  under. 4 


In  addition  to  using  canvas  to  shade  windows,  long  curtains  or 
shades  were  constructed  for  porches  or  piazzas  so  that  residents  could 
enjoy  summer  breezes  without  the  glaring  sun.  Such  curtains  were  used 
at  the  Wayside  on  the  west  end  of  the  Piazza  (see  Illustration  6). 
These  were  also  made  by  the  awning  company.  Morel  and  writes: 


Piazza  screens  of  awning  material  can  be  fitted 
and  hung  as  window  shades  with  strong  spring  roll- 
ers at  the  top,  protected  from  the  weather,  or  be 
fitted  with  cords  and  rings  similar  to  the  Austri- 
an shade.  They  should  be  made  to  fill  the  space 
between  the  piazza  posts  or  pillars,  to  which 
during  the  awning  season  stout  wires  should  be 
stretched  up  and  down.  The  screens  can  thus  be 
attached  to  the  wire  by  rings  on  the  sides  and 
prevented  from  being  blown  about. 5 


There  is  no  evidence  that  the  Wayside's  piazza  curtains  were  hung  in 
this  manner.  They  seem  to  have  hung  from  curtain  rods  or  poles  that 
were  attached  to  the  eaves  of  the  porch. 

As  Morel  and  implies,  awnings  could  operate  on  a  roller  system.  A 
trade  catalog  for  Jay  C.  Wemple  Co.  in  Chicago  (1895)  advertised 
"perfected  Spring  Awning  rollers  which  are  most  desireable,  as  being 


4.  Moreland,  p.  314. 

5.  Ibid. 


490 


the  only  way  of   hanging   awnings;    as   by  their   use  the  cloth    is   pre- 
served  and   economy   in   space   afforded. "6     Sears   and  Montgomery  Ward 
both   sold   pulleys   and   rollers  for   awnings.     Both   businesses   adver- 
tised  awnings   for   sale   in   their   catalogs,   but   only   listed  white 
canvas   or  heavy  duck   cloth   (so   named   because  of   its   impermeability). 
They  did   not   picture  ready-made   awnings   nor   did  they  sell    striped 
canvas   fabric. 

Striped   or   solid   awnings   seem  to   have  been   the  favored   types.     While 
a  variety  of   stripes  were   available,   greens   and   browns   seem  to  have 
the  highest   survival    rate   and   this   might   indicate   a  popular  prefer- 
ence.    Consumers  were  discouraged   from  purchasing   reds   because  the 
cost   to   produce   a  sun-fast   red   fabric    increased   the  cost   of  the   awn- 
ing   (according  to  Wemple).     We  know  that   the  Wayside's   awnings  were 
striped   green   and  white  from  photographic   evidence   and   from  MML's 
testimony.     The  current   awnings   in   the   attic   are   also   green   and  white; 
out   these  were   not   original    to  HML's   occupancy. 

The  Wayside  awning  sample  is  labeled  "Artistic  Brand/made  by/The 
Hettrick  Mfg.  Co. /Summit  &  Magnolia  Toledo  0."  A  check  with  the 
Toledo-Lucas  County  Public  Library  reveals   that   the  Hettrick  Brothers 


6.     Jay  C.    Wemple  Co.,    New  York   and  Chicago,    importers   of  window 
shade   and   awning   hardware,   1895.      Philadelphia  Athenaeum. 


491 


Co.  was  founded  in  Toledo  in  1893.  The  Hettrick  Manufacturing  Co. 
was  incorporated  in  1916,  and  1918  was  the  first  year  that  the  com- 
pany was  listed  in  the  city  directory  at  the  Summit  and  Magnolia 
Streets  location.  The  company  closed  its  Toledo  plant  in  1961  and 
moved  its  operations  to  North  Carolina.7  Because  MML  does  not 
mention  purchasing  new  awnings  for  the  Wayside  in  any  of  her  inter- 
views (it's  quite  possible  that  no  one  asked  her),  I  would  assume  that 
the  awnings  in  the  attic  might  have  been  old  to  her  during  her  inter- 
views in  the  nineteen  sixties.  They  probably  post-date  HML's  life- 
time, judging  by  their  condition.  The  set  that  I  examined  were  cot- 
ton canvas,  printed  on  one  side.  They  were  machine  stitched  with 
double  needle  stitching  and  could  be  adjusted  with  white  cotton 
cords.  The  armature  was  galvanized  metal,  not  iron.  They  could  be 
attached  to  the  window  frame  with  cotter  pins  through  grommet  holes  in 
the  canvas.  Considering  that  the  awnings  were  exposed  to  bright  sun- 
light while  in  use  they  did  not  exhibit  great  deterioration.  I  would 
tentatively  date  these  awnings  as  about  twenty  years  old,  and  proba- 
bly no  older  than  the  nineteen  thirties.  They  are  certainly  not  the 
first  set  of  awnings  at  the  Wayside;  but  they  probably  replicate  the 
others  in  size  since  they  were  attached  in  the  same  manner.  We  know 


7.  See  attached  xeroxes  of  newspaper  clippings  and  appropriate 
pages  from  Toledo  City  Directories.   I  am  grateful  to  James  L.  Mur- 
phey,  Reference  Librarian,  Toledo-Lucas  County  Public  Library,  for 
locating  this  information. 


492 


from  Illustration  1  that  the  house  had  awnings  at  least  since  MML 
was  about  three  (1886).  Whether  these  were  a  Lothrop  addition  or 
already  on  the  house  when  they  purchased  the  Wayside  is  difficult  to 
tell. 

The  Wayside  had  awnings  on  three  sides  of  the  house.  Because  it  is 
always  shaded,  the  north  side  did  not  have  awnings.   Illustration  3 
shows  the  metal  attachments  in  the  window  frame  that  held  the  awnings 
in  place.  These  markers  are  still  present  and  can  act  as  guides  for 
determining  the  size  and  placement  of  reproduction  awnings.  Illus- 
tration 1,  the  earliest  view  of  the  Lothrops  and  their  awnings,  shows 
striped  awnings  with  deeply  cut,  scalloped  edges.  The  awnings  pulled 
up  when  not  in  use.  Note  that  the  awning  over  the  west  window  of 
Una's  room  encloses  the  exterior  shutters  or  blinds  so  that  these  can 
be  closed  while  the  awning  is  in  place. 

Illustration  2,  a  reception  for  Mrs.  John  A.  Logan  in  August,  1890, 
shows  the  Lothrops1  new  piazza  draped  with  an  enormous  American  flag. 
The  flag  is  not  as  heavy  as  awning  material  but  it  adequately  solves 
the  problem  of  appropriate  decor  for  a  patriotic  event,  while  keeping 
the  main  participants  out  of  the  sun.  Such  a  flag,  reproduced,  would 
add  a  great  deal  to  the  Wayside's  appearance  on  important  occasions 
and  provide  interpreters  with  the  opportunity  to  discuss  the  outdoor 
events  and  pageants  that  HML  orchestrated.  If  such  flags  are  no 


493 


longer   available  from  established  manufacturers,   contact   the  Philadel- 
phia College  of  Textiles   and  Science,    Henry  Avenue   and  School   House 
Lane,   Philadelphia,   Pennsylvania  19144.      This   school    designed    a  cus- 
tom-made flag  for   the   entrance   to  New  York's   harbor   in   1979. 

A  view  of  the   Wayside's   south   elevation,    taken   about   1892   (Illus- 
tration 4),    shows   a   large,    striped,    eliptical    awning  over  the   center 
second   floor   hall.     This   awning  reaches   from  below  the   cornice   at  the 
apex  of  the   pediment   to   a  projection   that   appears   to  be  on   the   same 
plane   as   the   bay  window  system  on   the  first   floor  below   it.     The 
awning  gives   the  house   the   appearance  of  a  gay  circus   tent.     Also   note 
the   absence  of   awnings  on   the   first   floor   front   window  at   that 
time. 

Illustration  5  shows   the   bay  awning  drawn   up.      It   forms   a  point   with 
two  swags   at   either   side,    similar   to  Morel and's  Austrian   shade 
awnings.     We  have  no   surviving   record   of  the  mechanical    construction 
of   this   awning. 

Illustration  6   shows   the   piazza  drapes.     These   seem  to   have  been 
striped,   multi-colored   canvas.     HML  did   keep  them  drawn   behind   the 
pillars   as   Morel  and   advises.     They  seem  to   have  been  more  colorful 
than   the   awnings.      A  brown,   white,    and   green  Roman   stripe   is   recom- 
mended  for   these  reproductions. 


494 


The  Old  House  Journal  Buyer's  Guide  lists  Astrup  Company,  2937  W.  25 
Street,  Cleveland,  Ohio  44113,  (216)  696-2800,  as  a  source  of  repro- 
duction awnings  and  awning  hardware.   It  is  quite  possible  that  any 
awning  manufacturer  could  reproduce  the  Wayside's  awnings  using  the 
illustrations  in  this  report  and  the  awning  sample  in  the  attic  as 
general  guides.  The  awnings  can  easily  be  removed  by  park  personnel 
and  stored  in  the  attic  when  out  of  season.  Their  appearance  while  in 
place  should  reflect  use,  not  uniformity.  Draw  them  up  or  down  as 
required  by  the  sunlight  in  the  room.   In  the  nineteenth  century, 
before  central  air  conditioning,  the  awnings  were  left  down  when  it 
rained,  thus  allowing  the  windows  to  remain  open.  While  the  windows 
at  the  Wayside  might  not  remain  open  at  all  times,  it  is  certainly  not 
necessary  to  raise  the  awnings  in  case  of  rain.  With  regards  to 
replacement  of  sun-rotted  awnings,  the  curator  will  probably  find  it 
desirable  to  retain  a  set  of  patterns  so  that  new  awnings  can  be 
manufactured  to  resemble  the  reproductions  and  the  park  will  be 
protected  should  a  vendor  go  out  of  business. 


495 


ILLUSTRATIONS 


497 


Illustration  1. 

The  Lothrops  and  friend,  Miss  Peabody,  at  the 
Wayside,  1886. 

Source:  MMNHP. 


498 


Illustration  2. 

Reception  for  Mrs.  John  A.  Logan  at  the  Wayside, 
August,  1890. 

Source:  MMNHP. 


500 


niustration  3. 

Close-up  of  window,    second  floor,   east  end   showing 
awning   attachments. 

Source:     MMNriP. 


502 


■ 


■-: 


m 


■ 


Illustration  4. 
Awnings,  south  elevation,  c.  1892, 
Source:  MMNHP. 


504 


Mil 


Illustration  5. 

Awnings,  south  elevation,  c.  1892  with  bay  awning 
drawn  up. 

Source:  MMNHP. 


506 


Illustration  6. 
Awnings,  west  elevation,  showing  piazza  drapes 
Source:  MMNHP. 


APPENDIX 
Newspaper  Accounts  of  Awning  Manufacturer 


510 


Smith  Leaves  Hettrick; 
EggaSWSP1^  President 

Outgoing  Executive  Expects  To  Continue 
In  Distribution  Of  Company's  Products 

Resignation  of  W.  I.  Smith  as  chairman,  president 
And  director  of  Hettrick  Manufacturing  Co.  and'  the 
flection  of  Edward  J.  Eggart,  management  expert,  to 
succeed  him  as  president  and  director  was  announced 
today. 


Mr.  Smith,  long  associ- 
ated with  the  firm,  sub- 
mitted his  resignation  for 
health  reasons,  but  expects 
in  the  future  to  work  in  the  dis- 
tribution of  Hettrick  products. 
I.  P.  Smith,  formerly  board 
chairman,  resigned  in  August. 

Mr.  Eggart  is  a  principal  in 
the  management  consulting 
firm    of   Worden   &    Risberg    of 


Hettrick  Manufacturing,  with 
general  offices  in  Toledo,  also 
has  plants  in  Goshen  and  An- 
drews, Ind.,  and  Statesville, 
N.C.  Presently  there  are  814 
employees. 

The  company  manufactures 
and  distributes  casual  furniture, 
camping  equipment,  play  good3, 
and  fabricates  canvas  goods  in- 
cluding boat  and  motor  covers, 


Philadelphia  and  San  Francisco,    awnings  and  tents 
TOLEDO     BLADE:      WLDNIlSDAI',     AlA*     ^0,      iyo9 

Hettrick  Executive  Post 
Goes  To  Frank  M.  Crook 


Sales  Organization, 
Four  Plants  To  Be 
Under  His  Direction 

The  election  of  Frank  M. 
.Crook,  1138  East  River  Rd., 
Perrysburg,  former  Crane  Co. 
executive,  as  executive  vice 
president  of  the  Hettrick  Mfg. 
Co.  was  announced  today  by 
Ern-st  Horvath,  president. 

Mr.  Crook  will  have  his  head- 
quarters in  Toledo  and  will  take 
charge  of  four  Hettrick  plants 
in  three  states  together  with 
the  company's  own  sales  or- 
ganization in  48  states,  Mr. 
Horvath  said. 

Mr.  Crook  has  been  in  gen- 
eral management  and  sales 
development  31  years.  For  the 
lust  20  years  he  was  president 
of  Toledo  Desk  &  Fixture  Co., 
Maumee,  until  recently  a  sub- 
sidiary of  Crane.  Under1  his 
management,  that  firm  be- 
came one  of  the  nation's  lead- 
ing makers  of  steel  kitchen 
cabinets. 


Hettrick  Firm's 
Sale  Is  Ratified 

OCT  2  3  1958 
Eastern  Company 

Pays  $20  For  Stock 

Sale  of  Hettrick  Manufactur- 
ing Co.,  1401  Summit  St.,  to 
Boott  Mills,  Lowell,  Mass.,  was 
ratified  yesterday  by  Hettrick 
directors  after  86  per  cent  of 
"the  firm's  stock  was  turned  in. 

The  dpal,  involving  more  than 
$-3  million,  was  handled  by  Col- 
lin. Norton  &t  Co.,  Toledo  in- 
vestment house.  Under  Boott's 
proposal,  made  Oct.  3.  the  east- 
ern firm  is  paying  $20  a  share  i 
for  Hettrick  stock.  The  Toledo 
Trust  Co.  today  is  sending  out 
checks  covering  the  turned-in 
Ptnck. 

E.  J.  Eggart,  president  of 
Hettrick,  said  today  that  all  of 
'the  outstanding  Hettrick  stock 
probably  will  be  surrendered 
eventually  and  that  payment 
will  be  made  as  soon  as  it 
comes    in. 

According  to  a  previous  an- 
nouncement, Boott  will  retain 
present  Hettrick  management 
and  current  manufacturing  and 
merchandising  policies.  Also, 
the  Hettrick  Toledo  plant,  with 
1250  employees,  will  be  main- 
tained. 

Hettrick  manufactures  sum- 
mer and  casual  furniture,  awn- 
ings, camping  equipment,  hunt- 
ihg  and  "ports  clothing  and  has 
plants  in  Andrews,  Huntington 
■and  Goshen.  Ind.,  and  States- 
ville, N.C,  as  well  as  the  home 
plant  in  Toledo. 

Boott  Mills  is  a  subsidiary  of 
Massachusetts  Mohair  Plush 
Co..  which  has  planis  and 
offices  throughout  the  country. 


FRANK  M.  CROiOK 
Hettrick    vice    preiident 

Variety  Of  Manufactures 

Hettrick,  a  wholly  owned 
subsidiary  of  the  Buckeye 
Corp.,  Springfield,  O.,  manu- 
factures summer  and  casual 
xfurniture,  awnings,  camping 
*«iuipment,  hunting  and  sport 
clothing,  marine  and  other  play 
and  sporting  equipment.  Its 
industrial  division  produces 
belting,  web  strappings,  tar- 
paulins  and    laundry   textiles. 


The  66-year-old  company,  re- 
j  garded  as  the  world's  largest 
producer  of  tents  and  canvas 
products,  operates  plants  in 
Toledo,  Statesville,  N.C;  Gosh- 
en and  Andrews,  Ind.  Total 
employment  is  in  excess  of  850 
with  290  at  Toledo,  220  at 
Statesville,  135  at  Goshen  and 
205  at  Andrews. 

More  Diversification 

In  making  the  announcement, 
Mr.  Horvath  said  greater  di- 
versification, including  revitali- 
zation  of  Hettrick's  entire  man- 
ufacturing and  marketing  oper- 
ations,  is  being  undertaken. 

"We  believe  Mr.  Crook's 
longtime  experience  as  an  or- 
ganizer and  sales  executive 
will  enable  us  to  far  exceed 
our   previous    sales   high   of   $12 

'"ion  a  year,"  he  added. 


Mr.  Crook  said  he  plans  a 
streamlining  of  existing  pro- 
duction techniques  throughout 
the  company's  operation  to 
permit  the  addition  of  new  pro- 
duction lines  in  existing  facili- 
ties. This  will  lead  toward 
increased    employment  ^at    To.  i 

I  ledo  and  other  plant  locations"",' 
he  said. 

Pointing  up  the  direction  of' 
Hettrick's  future  plans.  Mr.  \ 
Crook  said  that  he  has.al-J 
i'«dy  engaged  the  services  of | 
well     known     stylists     for     the: 

I  complete     revamping     of     Het-1 

i  trick's     1960    line     of    summer 

I  and  casual  furniture. 


511 


Bontli 

ion*  S€99, 


!129  Kint 

gton    r "l~" 

ucon   (R): 

South.'  av 

:lao>   Go' 

1 

n  av       'J.4*,^ 
,outh  av-/jj 

/      -  •  •<  %l 

G  Hermann 

.    -  i*i 
jBter  av 

rr  U»i 
wood  a^-i 
id  av  •  'i  (.'■ 

jo 

Central   avj 
vlbton 
Stratford.^ 

-    ■•■>,■; 

i  pi 
Dorr 
*ay 
e    6    e 


ot 


9    Erie 

iden- 

ClnleyJaviTw 

Womahi- 

..  .'Tia 

Adrian  *-*1 
>bey    Glaajjl 

Segur  av"*^ 
V  Ccntral; 
rre   av 
ftvarre   av' 
lerman 
rlc 

wood  av!"-j 
rwood    av 
iMnewood' 
oe   h736 

7V-    WaahU 
2th     -" 
012   F6rs$ 
1910   Loct 
:ds    802   Dor 
lia 

e    NavaV  _ 
pcrior  .'TttJ 
e 

tros    Co 

/a  dr  Polh{ 
hr    1340    V^ 

embroMet 

rang* 
range 

h327R  Map 
54  Mlchlga.1 
970   Mlchlg 

Michigan1 
gan  ,l- 

\aat     Dlv 

Chase, 

Chase  ' 
crane  '   oi 
Jonathan')? 


Detroit 

4i89;  Bell  Ft 

)VAB1 

9 


'L-' — — 

Jiie  Toledo  Fuel  Co- 

art f\  A  1      Hard,  Soft  and 
VUAlw  pocahonta* 


Tcitdc    G+y    D.'r^cto-y,    lcM7 


Home   of  GENUINE 

Solvay  Coke 

208-9  Second  Natl  Bank  Bldg.  and  50  Main  SL 


-TOLEDO  CITT  DIRECTORY— 1917 


513 


JKaler    Anton     Janitor     2d     Natl     Bank 
.-bldg-   hl33    E   Broadway 
frrtiiu   lab   h2672    Kress 

ftVooMiile    C    polisher    h2135    Wakeman 

ij£iiln    Lawrence     P     tailor     r411    Wal- 

I  v  gtn  av 

tSlfary   B    (wld   Ja»   R>    h411    Walden   av 
!£cy|vester  D  oil  driller   r411   Walden  av 

|  dialing   Bernard    H   ship   elk   Berdan   & 
(CT  Co  ii654   Ashwood   av 
li/rurence   elk    r534    E    WoodrufT   av 
->Kdw   J    elk    Berdan    &    Co    h832    Booth 
"f Henry   H  collr   Johnson    Bros   Furn   Co 
■k-  r4i3   Williams 

Mini  H  foremn  h534  E  Woodruff  av 
sJhlorma   M    elk    rB34    E   Woodruff    av 
^filter   Arvld    O    slsmn    1U447    Palmwood 
3/Htb   (wld   Patk   H)    rl853    Champlam 
rp^rdun   »tcn   U   S   Dept  of   AsrioilfM" 
a^Mril7   20th 

l^Barry  T  glasswkr  rl950  Ontario 

Kino  mtrmn  r  J  V  Hester 

'lino  V   glasswkr   h  Josephine   av    (PP1) 
**B»]ph    c    dePt    mSr    Tol    R    &    L    Co 

fcfe--n  Tol  Beach 

•tLiton  Edna   H    r2224   Rosewood  av 
Kiiura  E   r2224   Rosewood   av 
PJflwls  E  slsmn   h2224    Rosewood   av 
sitf.ry  M  tchr   rl78    Watova   rd    (W) 
?J:VR  tchr   P  S   r82   Wlldwood 
^•Hobt  F  ctv   ens  E   H   Close    Realty   Co 
f?*>J    3145  Cambridge  av 
'  Vst    BaPtist     Church     Heston     sw     cor 
Pine  wood   av 
iwm  M  sales  promotion  Firestone  Tire 
£  *■  Rubber  Co   rl78   Watova  rd    (W) 
»'wm  P  elsmn   hl78   Watova   rd    (W) 
,tta"rlngton    Louise    S    tchr    P    S    rl38 

lnurah  L  tchr  r!38   13th 

K$£t  Anna   maid    East   Side  Hosp   rll53 

'Vrick  Chas   H   elk   P.O   h351   W   Dela- 
ware av 
intra,  nurse    r3376   Parkwood   av 
rfvrun   P   gro    803    Broadway    h    do 
icarl  VV  foremn   rll   St  Bernard  dr 
ifLj  p   slsmn   h2074    Starr   av 

IThw  J   8hlp    clk   To1   Metal   Wheel   Co 
| '  hi  141   Palmwood   av 
ttfm  C  carp  hll   St  Bernard   dr 
htte»nelmcr  Harvey  L  asmblr  hl349  W 

Bancroft 
My0ger  Casslus  M  C  optician  809  Mon- 

ioe  h  do 
j.»el   B   rl411    Colton 
tjjtler  Geo   A   phys   h2,   819  Huron 
Mima"  Jos   lab    h604   Hillsdale   av    (R) 
jHxe  r2145    Jefferson   av 
SJ^fgle   asmblr   rl709    Detroit  av 
iTnnlor  r2108  Glenwood  av 
Jtjala   <wld    Edw    C)    r40l    W   Manhat- 
tan boul 

-ThH  K         MANCTFACTURING         CO, 
THK.      XVm      E     Hettrlck     Trea      and 
h<'  frt-«x.      J      B      Brrrmann      Vlce-Prea, 
^    ^uriir     A      Felllinch      Sec,      Mfr»     of 
inning*,        Tentn,        FlnKS,        1'nnvni 
f«Trr»      nnd      Cnnvna       Ucltlnit,      cor 
■MK      nn<'       Fernwood        >\,       Tclm 
H»»e   Main    1-2-3,    Bell    Forcat    121B- 
llia,  Belt   Factory   1228   Onkvrood   nv, 
j|  |«f«   right    bottom    linen) 
Millard  S  Rev  hl709  Detroit  av 
TTRlCK   WM   E,   Pre«   nnd   Trena   The 
g,Hrlrk    Mfa    Co,    h    2108    Glenwood 
'•y    Home    Tel    Pnrk    2148 
«u|  Chas    trav    r314    11th 
o«o  J  baker  h529   Tecumseh 
iinjer  Leo    A    lab    rl202    E    Bancroft 
Cf.r  lab  rl202  E  Bancroft 
•Jer  Ella  h716  Orange 


Uetamer  i 

Hetzner  Wm  B  Insp   rl24   16th 
Heuer   see   also    Heyer 
"  Chas   h   905   Blum 
"  Ella   elk    r905    Blum 
"  Henry    C    ship    elk    Campbell    Lmbr    & 

Mfg  Co  h727   Western  av 
•  Lorenzo   F   lab   h2103   Summit   av 
"  Wm  E   toed   mkr  hlll2   Prospect  av 
Heuerman  Aug  C  shipper  h2545   Foraker 
"  Clara   L    (wid   Ernest)    h580   Colburn 
"  Herbert  W  metal  wkr  r580  Colburn 
"  Lydla   M   r530   Colburn 
"  Mabel    P   sten   W   H    Heuerman    &    Son 

r774    Redwood    av 
"  Mary    H    dom    2707    Parkwood    av 
"  Wilbur    E    (Wm    H    Heuerman    &    Son) 

hll32   Halsted 
"  Wm     H     (Wm     H     Heuerman     &     Son) 

hT74     Rpdwnnd    nv 
"  Wm   H   &   Son    (Wm   H   and   Wilbur   E) 

conlis    1952    Broadway 
Heumann   Jno  H   rec  elk   Lasalle  &   Koch 

rl520  Jefferson   av 
Heupel  Cath   H   (wld  Julius)    rl833  Glen- 
wood  av 
"  Geo   W    slsmn   h620   Oakwood   av 
"  Irving  G   r620   Oakwood    av 
"  Ravmond    C    mach    h3261    Glenwood    av 
Haverly   Effle  R    (wld   Saml)    rl858   Chase 
"  Earl    Insp    rl858    Chase 
"  Florence  M   Insp  Lasalle  &  Koch   rl858 

Chase 
"  Hannah    M    smstrs    rl530    Michigan 
"  Wm   S   mach   hl858    Chase 
Hewitt   Belle    (wld    David)    rll26    Earl 
"  Chas    E   mgr   S    S    Kresge's    rl525    Col- 

llngwood    av 
"  Colllstla    R     (wld    Erwln)     rl723    Lib- 
erty 
"  David    porter  Glnder    Bros 
"Florence    B   rl.   Harold  Arms   Ter 
"  Harrison   mach   r527   Locust 
"  Henry    H    v-pres    The    Harnlt    &    He- 
witt  Co   hi.   Harold    Arms   Ter 
"  Jno     E    barber     1708    Woodville    hl723 

Liberty 
,"  Percy  lab  h348  Indiana  av 
"  Phyles    lab    rl723    Liberty 
"  Wayne   L   barber   rl723    Liberty 
Hewson    Robt   slsmn    Gen    Elec   Co   h2340 

*    Detroit  av 
Heybeck   Carl    rl317   Dorr 
Heyde  Paul  V  D  electn  h421  Western  av 
Heyden    Marie    G    opr    C    U    T    Co    rll61 

South    av 
Heydenberk    Herbert    H    mach    h3.    2117 

Jefferson    av 
Heyder  Geo   butcher   r388   Dorr 
Heyer   Emma   emp   Tledtke's   rl939   Erie 
HEYElt      FERDINAND     C,      DR.     Oateo- 
pnltile      Phyaiclnn.     42S-42»-l30     Ohio 
.Bldtr,   Home  Tel   Mnln   32S2-1R.   h  531 
Colllna,    Home    Tel    Main    32S2-2R 
"  Geo  E  engraver  r884  South  av 
"  Johanna    (wld    Jno)     h    rear    677    Con- 
gress 
"  Paul   E  elk   r884   South   av 
"  Richard   mach   h884   South  av 
"  Ruby  L  r3,  216  W  Bancroft 
"  Sophia    (wld    Lowls)    rl042   Orchard 
Heyman    see   also  Helmann 
"Albert   W    trucker   hl321    Walte    av 
"  Bernard  H  checker  r711   S  Erie 
"  Chas   A   eng  W  &   L   E   Ry   h540   East- 
ern av 

■  Chas  M  mach   r540  Eastern   av 

■  Esther    M    elk    C    Schlagheck    r711    S 

Erie 
"  Flavel    E     mgr    Up-to-Date    Tailoring 

Co    r326   Elm 
"Frank   W   bartndr  hi,    12    15th 


f  E  TOLEDO  TIRE  &  SUPPLY  CO.  ^}*™*™™. 

.243  ERIE  ST.  VULCANIZING      Ijt4£&|AH4> 

flto  Accessories,    Apparel        tires 


dro/cexs 

MUNICIPAL 
INDUSTRIAL 

NON-TAX 

CORPORATION 

BONDS 

Prefcr/vd 
SiocksSzt 
Iwestment 
Securities 

MEMBEfcS 
N.Y.STDCK 
EXCHANBE 

/zesr  fioo/z 

GfiGDNER. 

BIDS. 

Phonos 

\&\e> 


512 


icieiic  Ut 


7  V\ 


(tt 


l  or/ j 


ntV 


The  Kirschner-Wideman  Co.  ^zwlj,  f  t  |(|[< 

Real  Estate — Insurance — Loans — Surety  Bond  R    ,   p,  * 

UAm.  Ph...  917  7CM  MADMN  AVFNIIF.  R.ll  Pk„„-  lb:   OOtll   1    UOnCS    1> 


Homa  Phone  237 


708  MADISON  AVENUE 


Bell  Phone  36 


514 


1918 — TOLEDO   DIRECTORY  OO'S 


llenrlek 

Heerick  Jos  E  driver  hl252  Foster  av 
Hess  Albert  S  chauf  r  Geo  Hess 
"Chas    B    bkpr   D    L    &    W    Coal    Co    h2. 

2420    Glenwood    av 
"  Chas    E    gard    ss    Jerusalem    Stone    rd 

1   e  of  Wheeling  hdo 
"  Clarence    J    optometrist    J    J    Freeman 

Co   h9    Victoria    apts 
"  Claude   lab   r857    W  Central  av 
"  Diedrlch  Janitor  r2716  Albion 
"  Ellz   (wid  Ferdinand  C)    r6l4   Stratford 
"Finest   F   r614   Stratfoid    pi 
"  Frank    car    repr    hl220    South    av 
"  Fred  lab  h  ns  Woodville  rd  4  w  Beth- 
any ' 
"  Geo    lab    r2829   Lawrence    av 

*  Geo  H  autowkr  h810  McKinley  av 

*  Geo    J    gard    ns    Jerusalem    Stone    rd 

1    e   of   Wheeling   1)   do 
"Glenn  F  lnsp  r217  Utah 
"Grace    E    fin    sec    Tol    Women's    Assn 

r2924   Colllngwood  av 
■  Harry    H    dept     mgr     Tiedtke'e     rl210 

Jefferson    av 
"  Harry   W   foremn   h309   Adrian 
"  Henry     W    chemist    Llbbey     Glass    Co 

r614  Stratford  pi 
"  Herman    H    millwright    h526    Lewis   av 
"  Jas    F    watchman    h857    W    Central    av 
"  Jno   contr'  1205    Navarre   av   h   do 
"  Jno    eng    hlSll    Western    av 
"  Jno   B  sausagemkr  h820  Sherman 
"  Louis   lab    r309    Adrian 
"  Louis    D    driver    h217    Utah 
"  Mary   M    (wid   Gottlieb)    r   Geo   J   Hess 
"  Orley  W  springmkr  h831  Plnewood  av 
"  Otto    barber  601   Monroe   h736   Colllng- 
wood  av 
"  Peter   F   elk    Tol    Blade   res    Woodville 
"  Ralph   elk   h2818   Monroe 
"  Wm   soldier  rl220   Jackson 
"  Wm   C   lab   h425  Vance 
"Willis    C    trav    h2,    818    Michigan 
Hessberger    Jos    A    dry    goods    802    Dorr 

h80l    Magnolia 
"  Jos  E  tel  opr  h805  Magnolia 
Hesse    Albert    In    charge   U    S   Navy    Re- 
cruiting Station  r711  Superior 
"  Anna    A    r    O    A    Hesse 
"  Chas  W   meatctr   r~ll    Superior 
"  Edw  W  plmbr  h20i6   Franklin  av 
"  Ida  A   r345   Irving 
"  Otto  A   foremn   h   ns  Ottawa  dr  3   e  of 

Point  PI  rd 
Hessel    Callle    music    tchr    1340    W    Dela- 
ware  r   do 
"  Geo   lab   rl217   Miami 
Hesselbart    Luclle    r2306    Lagrange 
"  Martin    mach   h2306    Lagrange 
Hessenbrock   Gusta  r3007  Albion 
Hessenius   Erna    rl9B4    Michigan 
"  Erwln   M   electn   hl970   Michigan 
*  Mlchl  G  mach   hd  hl954  Michigan 
"  Slna  dom   2471   Glenwood   av 
HBSSER    JACOB     It.    Genl    Initp    Dlv    Of 
Inspection     h     1837     Chuae,     Tel     Dell 
Main   3134 
"  Marlon    A    rl837   Chase 
Hesslck  Clarence  L  h28li   Front 
"  Clifton   lab   h2379   York 
Hessler  Anton  car  repr  hl33  E  Broadway 
"  Chas   blksmlth   h2572   Kress 
"  Roamie  C  polisher   h2135   Wakeman 
»  Walter  C  elk  Tol  Scale  Co  r2434  Law- 
ton  av 
Hesslln   Lawrence   P   tailor   r41l   Waiden 
"  Mary   E    (wid   Jas  R)    h411    Waiden   av 
"  Sylvester  D  oil  driller  r4ll   Waiden  av 
Hessllng  Bernard  H   elk  Berdan  Co   h654 

Ashwood    av 
"  Clarence   lab   r534    E  Woodruff   av 
"  Edw   J    elk    Berdan   Co    h832    Booth    av 


IICMMllllg 

Frank    mach    hd    r2018    Smead    av 


TO 


"rnmil 

lerman    Anna    phone    "Pi 

rnold    H    plmbr   r580   Co 


"  Henry   J    collr   Johnson    Bros    Furn    f/"»«    h254"    Forakor    a 

r308    Oliver  ia*      ,     '.J    i.'rne>(ti    h& 

"Jos   H   foremn   h534   E   Woodruff  ftv     »ra  L   (w ld   ^rnesU    n 

"  Norma    r534    E   Woodruff    av  I  '    *    r?,f    VtJr 

HTester    Arvld    O    slsmn    Tol    R    &    L  |'    ^" 'J*cf£"  1132    Mai 

hl447    Palmwood   av  ft-1' D4T  hn  °n»    wkr    h774 

"Burt    grinder    hl37    Huron  i^i  "rffh     f  wldT  Jul  i«) 

"Cath  J   (wid  Patk  H)   hl853  Champl-  '»"'    ,CaQ^     (wld    J,,MU8; 

Geo    porter    rl401    Miami  «,„ °°2    *„,„.„_   hT>Sl    Gl 

Gordon   F  elk  TT  S  Dept   of   Agrrleult**-    *ec°fat°      5 tand  % 

h3222    Cottage    av  kc«   nlv,,,^    «» 


ttage 

"  Harry    T    glasswkr    hl950    Ontario 
Jas   mach   hi  US   S   15th 


h620   Oakwood    av 
•aymond    C    r32fil    G\en] 


Beach 
"  Robt   P   drftsmn   G   M   Jones   Co  bz» 

"St^B^tlst6    cWch     Heston     sw    f  gar  r«0»  Stlckney  av 

Plnewood    av  ■■ 

"  Wm    M   slsmn    Firestone   Tire    &   Bu 

ber  Co   rl78  Watova  rd   (W) 
"  Wm   P  slsmn   hl78    Watova   rd 
Heter  Wlllard   K   r636  Valleywood  dr 
Hetherlngton   Alice  Mrs   h5.    1515   Jea 

son  av 
"  Alice   student   ro.    1515   Jefferson  av 
"  Louise   tchr   r5,    1515  Jefferson  av 
"  Wm  soldier  r714   E  Bancroft 
Hetman  Jos  lab  h604  Hillsdale  av  (B) 
Hetrick,    see    also    Hedrick    and    Hettn 
"  Chas  H  elk   P  O   h351    W   Delaware 
"  Clara    nurse    Flower    Hospital 
"  Cyrus  P  gro   3301   Bishop  h  do 
"  Earl    W    carp    rll    St    Bernard    dr 
"  Fred    D    elec    eng    Creamery    Packs 

Mfg  Co   h2074   Starr   av  •y«r"««i   also   Heuer 

"Theo    J    elk    hU41    Palnn    x>d    av         8^'  ^    tel    opr    N    Y 
"Wm    C    carp    hll    St    Bernard    dr      ,   '•"")»    C    tel    opr 
Hettesheimer    Harvey    L    mach    hl333        ^Jie 

Bancroft  F'ER     FERDINAM 


Earl 
■has    P  detective    rl510 


enry  H   v-pres  The  He 
■  Co  hi  Harold   Arms  te 
ho    E    barber    1708     W 
Liberty 

^'ITT  O  PERCY,  Hot 
Ind  I.tinch  Room.  IllRh 
■n«I  Conrteouii  Attentl 
.  Tel  Bell  Forent  04.  h  1 
'hlllp  lab  hU25  Vlnal 
"ayne  L  barber  rl723  I 
L,son  Robt  slsmn  Genei 

h4.    2340    Detroit    av 
Tde     Paul     electn     h633 
Vdenberk    Bert    H    mete 

2117   Jefferson   av 
^dinger    Edw    (Klnsely 

h«23   Nevada 


Hettinger     Casslus 
Monroe    h    do 


M     C     optician 


Bltfg.     Home     Tel     M» 

"Hazel    B  elk   Emch's   Drug  Store  rHfc&31   CoHln..   Home  Te' 

Colton  ,eo    E    etlgT    r  x     h 

Hettler  Geo  phys  (U  8  A)   h214.  2H  ><"    '"hanna    (wid    Jno)    h 
Hettrlck.    see   also   Hedrick    and   Httru      Kress  an„.h   i 

"  Bernlce    M    r2108    Glenwood    av  f^chd    la b    n884   Hoi  in 

"  Lydia    (wid    Edw   C)    r401    W   Manh»    kphla  L  (wid  Lewis)   * 
t»n    houl  Urtian,  see  also  Heiman 

tan    Doul  r,    Mbert   W   lab   hl321    W 

rTRICK  MANUFACTURING  *  fcrnard  H  elk  M  C  R  1 
THE.  Wm  E  Hettrlok  Pre.  »  Cha"  H  en*  h540  East 
Trenn.     J      B      Breynmnn      Vlee-r"    Chas  macn     r540     E; 

George  A  Fellbaeh  Sec.  Mfr«  of  A'     g,^     54Q   Ea3tern   av 
ln*«.     Tonln,     Fln««,     Ciinvna     C»>'     Rather    M    rTll    S    Erie 
un.l    Cnnvnx    Belting.    1401-30    *"■"?,     frank    W    bartndr    hi. 


IIETTRICK 


pnthlc     Phyalolon. 


4 
4i 


cor   MiiKiiolln.    l>Ui   Home   Mala  45! 

4312-4,113.    Bell    Main    480<    See  r< 

bottom    llnea) 
-Wlllard    S    Rev    hl709    Detroit   av  (Geo  Heymp 

HETTRICK   WM  E.  Pre«  and  Tre«»  J'    ■  Drln,6r„    406-8    Jackf 

Hettrlok    M(K    Co.    h    2108    Glen"**    »j^ann     paut     r     pres 
Home    Tel    Pnrk    21441 


jo  (Heyman  &  Stoek 
Jirry  A  eng  h522U,  F 
*m   M  bkpr   r71l   S   Ei 


nv.    . 

"  Wm    E   student    r2108   Glenwood  »T 
Hetzc^l    Chas    soldier    r314    11th 
'■'  Geo   J    baker    h629    Tecumseh 
"  Violet    elk    Hettrlck    Mfg   Co    ro29 

cumseh 
Hetzner    Wm   B   watchman   h   B.   ion 

Bancroft 
Heuer,    see    also    Heyer 
"  Amanda    D    r905    Blum 
"  Chas   A   lab   h905   Blum 
"  Ella    F    drsmkr    905    Biiim    r    do 
"  Henry    tallymn    h737    Western   av 
"  Henry  A   autowkr  r737  Western  »' 
"  Walter   E   r905    Blum 
"  Wm   E   toolmkr   hlll2   Prospect 


J.E.SWEATMAN 

Plumbing  Goods  at  Wholesale  and  Retail 


513 


Home  P.  Main  1 14 
Bell  P.  Main  6212 

449  Huron 


The  Ohio  plate  &  W 
.  h.2416  Putnam 
Klchd  C  elk  The  Ohio  1 
T*  Glass  Co  r241G  Put 
*Sn,  see  also  Heln  and 
Augusta  Mrs  hll04  V 
Edwin  W  (E  W  Hey 
__ Glenwood  av 
I  W  &  Co   (E  W  Heyn 

man)    whol    llQUors 
Frieda    r624    Arcadia    I 
Villus    h225S    Glenwoo 
tarie    A     (wid    Albrec 
-fc^  wood  av 
Rosalie    r3,  *»05    W    Ba 


A. 


IWm. 

318-319  Bank  ol  C< 

PUBLIC  AC< 

Hem*  Phou 


~J^       i     318-31S 


I  e6o 


J-^<iuSTt  I  <^     -     Uj  £      \\«TfriCJC     r-Cj^i 


Manufacturer    Is 
Taken  By  Death 


Photo  by  Lewis  Studio. 
W.    E.    HETTRICK 

W.  E.  Hettrick 
Dies  After  2 

Month  Illness 

IUu ;-<^ 

Toledoan  Helped  Build 
Up  Largest  Canvas 
Goods  Factory  In  Coun- 
try During  War. 


Won  Big  Contracts 


William  E.  Hettrick.  58.  through 
whoa©  genius  and  executive  ability 
the  largest  canvas  goods  factory  In 
the  United  States  was  developed  In 
Toledo,  died  Thursday  night  at  his 
home,  2108  Glenwood  avenue. 

Hettrick  had  been  i!l  for  more 
than  two  months,  but  his  death  was 
attributed    directly    to    heart   disease. 

He  was  born  In  Chicago.  Aug.  25, 
1870,  but  came  to  Toledo  at  the  age 
of  10  and  was  educated  In  the  public 
schools   here. 

In  1893.  with  his  broth»r  Edward 
F.  Hettrick.  he  founded  the  Hettrick 
Bros.  Co  ,  which  was  incorporated 
as  the  Hettrick  Manufacturing  Co. 
In  1900.  During  the  Spanish -Amei  i- 
can  war  their  reputation  was  suffi- 
ciently established  to  enable  them 
to  secure  a  contract  from  the  gov- 
ernment for  army  tents  which  caused 
a   rapid    expansion    in   the   business. 


Busy    During   War. 

The  company  did  a  large  business 
In  all  parts  of  the  United  Btates 
and  In  South  America  Many  men 
who  later  founded  similar  businesses 
were  trained  under  Hett'lck.  who  be- 
came recognized  as  a  leader  in  the 
canvas  goods  industry.  At  one  time 
bis  factories  employed  more  than 
1,000  men  and  consumed  the  output 
of  several  mills. 

The  government  used  Hettrick 
tents  and  covers  during  the  World 
war,  and  the  factory  came  to  be  one 
of  the.  largest  buyers  of  canvas  and 
cotton  goods  In  the  nation.  The 
main  plant  was  located  at  1401  Sum- 
mit street. 

In  July.  1927.  he  withdrew  from 
the  Hettrick  Manufacturing  Co.  to 
start  the  new  firm  of  W.  E.  Hettrick 
&  Son,  which  continued  to  deal  In 
cotton  goods.  His  eon,  William  E. 
Hettrick.  Jr..  was  the  Junior  partner, 
and  is  expected  to  take  over  the  con- 
duct  of    the    business. 

Besides  his  son,  Hettrick  leaves  his 
wife.  Mrs.  Alice  E.  Hettrick:  a  daugh- 
ter, Mrs.  T.  L.  Young,  and  a  slater, 
Mrs.   D.  P.  Boyd,  all   of  Toledo. 

He  was  a  32nd  degree  Mason  and 
a  member  of  Zenobla  Shrine,  and  of 
the  Elks.  The  body  was  taken  to 
the  Foth  <k  Son  funeral  home.  Serv- 
ices probably  will  be  held  Monday, 
with  interment  in  Woodlawn  ceme- 
tery. 


W.  E.  HETTRICK 
TAKEN  BY  DEATH 


,e*\-\q-2/? 


Claimed  by  Death 


William  F.  Hettrick 
William  K.  Hettrick,  5B,  presi- 
dent of  the  W,  E.  Hettrick  A  Son, 
Inc.,  who  riled  In  lils  home,  2108 
(ilenwoml  avenue,  Friday  nl^ht. 
Is  shown  in  Mi*  accompanying 
picture. 


514 


Toledo  Manufacturer  Dies 

in  Home  Following 

Heart  Attack. 


William  E.  Hettrick,  68.  president 
and  treasurer  of  the  W.  E.  Hettrick 
A  Son,  Inc..  well-known  manufac- 
turer, died  Friday  night  In  his  home, 
2108   Glenwood   avenue. 

Mr.  Hettrick  had  been  In  ill  health 
more  than  two  months,  but  his  death 
was   attributed     to     heart     disease. 

Funeral  services  will  be  conducted 
in  the  home  Monday  at  2  P.  M.  by 
members  of  the  Scottish  rite,  and 
by  Dr.  Stephen  K.  Mahon.  Burial 
will  be   In   Woodlawn   cemetery. 

Born  in  Chicago,  Aug.  25,  1870,  he 
came  to  Toledo  when  10  years  old, 
and  was  educated  in  the  public 
schools  here. 

Started  Business  in  1893 

His  father,  a  sailmaker,  the  young 
man  became  interested  in  canvas 
goods  and  with  $300,  most  of  which 
was  borrowed,  embarked  in  his  first 
business  venture  in  1893.  Mr.  Het- 
trick was  foreman,  salesman  and 
worker.  With  bis  brother.  Edwrasdj 
F.,  associated  with  him,  the  business 
was  incorporated  in  1900  as  the 
Hettrick    Manufacturing   Co. 

The  Spanish  -American  war 
brought  a  contract  from  the  United 
States  government  for  army  tents 
which  caused  a  rapid  expansion  In 
the  business.  Mr.  Hettrick  immedi- 
ately began  construction  of  a  build- 
ing of  his  own. 

The  company  did  a  large  business 
in  all  parts  of  the  United  States  and 
In  South  America.  At  one  time,  his 
factories  consumed  the  output  of 
several  mills,  and  employed  more 
than  1.000  men.  The  main  plant  was 
at  1401  Summit  street. 

War  Brings  Expansion 

During  the  World  war,  the  gov- 
ernment purchased  tents  and  covers 
from  the  Hettrick  Co.  and  the  fac- 
tory became  one  of  the  largest 
buyers  of  canvas  and  cotton  goods 
in   the   nation. 

Mr.  Hettrick  withdrew  from  the 
Hottrlck  Manufacturing  Co.  In  July] 
1927,  to  establish  the  new  firm  of 
W.  E.  Hettrick  &  Son,  Inc.,  asso- 
ciating with  him  as  a  Junior  partner, 
his  son,   William  E.  Hettrick,  Jr. 

Besides  his  son,  Mr.  Hettrick  Is 
survived  by  his  wife,  Alice  E.;  a 
daughter,  Mrs.  Thomas  L.  Young, 
and  a  sister,  Mrs.  D.  P.  Boyd,  all  of 
Toledo. 

He  was  a  32nd  degree  Mason  and 
a  member  of  the  Zenobla  Shrine  and 
the  Toledo   lodge  of   Elks. 


-^>«<u  \- »**-&<{ 


\o 


leeic1 


_L  \n Oust v- 1  t-^ 


y\  ^\\<  .ck    /v\o^^  if 


C/f/u  /  i  ^i  ^ 


Mr.  Brooks 


Hettrick  Promotes 
W.  M.  Brooks  To 
Product  Manager 

The  promotion  of  Wesley  M. 
Brooks.  3087  12lst  St.,  to  prod- 
uct    manager  ■•  for     both     the 
marine  products  and  play,  pool 
Equipment    de- 
partment*      of 
Hettrick    Man- 
ufacturing Co., 
bL  Toledo,   has 
been       an- 
nounced   by 
Russe'll    L. 
£  a  w  s  on,   ad- 
ministrator    of 
marketing   and 
m  e  r  c  h  a  n- 
tiising. 

,-  Fqr  the  last 
y  e  a  r.  M  r. 
Brooks,  has  been  special  ma- 
rine sales  representative  for 
Hettrick.  working  with  major 
hoat  manufacturers  on  wind- 
shield designs,  covers,  cush- 
ions,    seats    and    other    equip- 

Brooks  will  be   responsible  for 
the    design,    development    and 
marketing    of    Hettrick's    ma- 
rine  products   line   as    well    as 
play  and  swimming  pools.  The 
cfompany  is  expanding  its  prod- 
uct lines  in  these  areas. 
"  Mr    Brooks  is  a   graduate  of 
Western    Michigan    University 
and  attended  Columbia  Univer- 
sity's graduate  school. 
''Hettrick  is  one  of  the  nation  s 
largest  manufacturers  of  sport- 
ing    goods,     casual    furniture, 
children's     play     equipment 
canvas  products  and  farm  and 
industrial  goods. 

The  company,  a  subsidiary 
of  Buckeye  Corp.,  Springfield. 
0  .  has  plants  in  Statesville, 
N.C.;  Goshen  and  Andrews, 
Ind.,  as-  well  as  in  Toledo. 
General   offices   are   in  Toledo, 


Hettrick  To  Close  Toledo 
Plant,  Move  To  North  Carolina 

Tent  Manufacturer  Announces  Decision 
To  Shut  Down  To  150  Employees 


Hettrick  Manufacturing  Co. 
is,  closing  its  administrative 
offices  and  Lent-manufacturing 
operations  in  Toledo  and  mov- 
ing them  to  the  company's 
Statesville,  N.C.  plant,  Al  Tom- 
bari,  executive  vice  president, 
said  today 

Mr.  Tombari  announced  the 
decision  to  150  Toledo  employ- 
ees yesterday.  He  said  he  did 
not  know  how  many  employees 
would  move,  too,  but  that  Some 
production  workers  would  go, 
and  administrative  and  key 
personnel  were  being  encour- 
aged to  do  so. 

Moving;   Within   fiO   Days 

Present  plans  call  for  moving 
administrative  offices  to  North 
Carolina  this  month  and  pro- 
duction operations  within  60 
days. 


The  decision  to  move  was 
based  in  part  on  the  inability 
to  find  a  more  economical 
plant  in  the  Toledo  area  more 
suited  to  tent  manufacturing, 
Mr.  Tombari  said.  The  Het- 
trick plant  at  1401  Summit  St. 
contains  300,000  square  feet  and 
only  77.000  square  feet  is  being 
used,  Mr.  Tombari  said. 

Another  factor  was  that  the 
source  of  raw  materials  (can- 
vas) is  closer  to  the  Statesville 
plant.  This  facility  contains 
165,000  square  feet  and  is  used 
to  manufacture  tents,  awnings, 
hunting  and  fishing  clothing 
and    tarpaulins. 

Selling  Belting  Operation 

Hettrick  is  attempting  to  sell 
its  industrial  belting  manufac- 
turing operation  to  some  local 
concern  and  this  will  not.be  in- 
cluded in  the  move,  Mr.  Tom- 
bari said. 

Hettrick  was  founded  here  in 
1893  and  in  the  1950s  was  con- 
sidered the  world's  largest 
manfacturer  of  canvas 
products. 

The  company  was  sold  in 
1958  to  Buckeye  Corp.  for  $3 
million. 

Buckeye  announced  in  Sep- 
tember that  all  metal  furniture 
manufacturing  o  p  e  r  a  t  i  ons 
would  be  consolidated  at  plants 
in  Florida.  This  meant  the 
closing  of  a  factory  at  Goshen, 
Ind.,  employing  from  10  to  350 
persons. 


515 


As  the  nation's  principal  conservation  agency,  the  Department  of  the 
Interior  has  basic  responsibilities  to  protect  and  conserve  our  land  and 
water,  energy  and  minerals,  fish  and  wildlife,  parks  and  recreation 
areas,  and  to  ensure  the  wise  use  of  all  these  resources.  The 
department  also  has  major  responsibility  for  American  Indian  reservation 
communities  and  for  people  who  live  in  island  territories  under  U.S. 
administration . 

Publication  services  were  provided  by  the  graphics  staff  of  the  Denver 
Service  Center.        NPS     2117